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Comment: Political Science != Science (Score 1) 567

by h8sg8s (#47345185) Attached to: Swedish Farmers Have Doubts About Climatologists and Climate Change

I'm old enough to remember the Food Pyramid and the groupthink 'science' that led to it. To say I'm suspicious of the current AGW craze is an understatement. Anytime contrarian scientific findings and theories are discounted out of hand, my BS detector blows a fuse. Take the politics out of current Climate Science and let's look at *all* the data and theories.

Comment: Re:R's support lower H1B caps? (Score 1) 341

by h8sg8s (#47336065) Attached to: If Immigration Reform Is Dead, So Is Raising the H-1B Cap

Gutierrez and his fellow Democrats seem only interested in Hispanic illegal immigration, not those H1-B legal immigrants from Asia. I suspect the roots of this are simply that Asians are a mixed bag politically while latinos tend to vote Democratic as a bloc. The one time I asked the question of my local (D) Congress critter, they gave me the deer in the headlights look in return. I don't think they have a dog in that paricular fight, but they should.

+ - Geophysicists Discover How Rocks Produce Magnetic Pulses

Submitted by KentuckyFC
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Since the 1960s, geophysicists have known that some earthquakes are preceded by ultra-low frequency magnetic pulses that increase in number until the quake takes place. But this process has always puzzled them: how can rocks produce magnetic pulses? Now a group of researchers has worked out what's going on. They say that rocks under pressure can become semiconductors that produce magnetic pulses under certain circumstances. When igneous rocks form in the presence of water, they contain peroxy bonds with OH groups. Under great temperature and pressure, these bonds break down creating electron-holes pairs. The electrons become trapped at the site of the broken bonds but the holes are free to move through the crystal structure. The natural diffusion of these holes through the rock creates p and n regions just like those in doped semiconductors. And the boundary between these regions behaves like the p-n junction in a diode, allowing current to flow in one direction but not the other. At least not until the potential difference reaches a certain value when the boundary breaks down allowing a sudden increase in current. It is this sudden increase that generates a magnetic field. And the sheer scale of this process over a volume of hundreds of cubic metres ensures that these magnetic pulses have an extremely low frequency that can be detected on the surface. The new theory points to the possibility of predicting imminent earthquakes by triangulating the position of rocks under pressure by searching for the magnetic pulses they produce (although significantly more work needs to be done to characterise the process before then)."

+ - Researchers make bottles easier to open by making them parallelograms->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "If glass could be made easier to open, perhaps it could make a bit of a comeback outside of the premium-level food brands that now comprise most of its users. A new patent granted to a team of Japanese researchers sets out to do just that — with simple geometry.

The biggest issues in lid stickiness is shape; a shirt or kitchen towel can help provide some extra grip, but a smooth circular lid is still hard to hold onto against great force. The researchers performed an ingenious series of tests with various jar shapes, from a self-reported level of difficulty to electromyographs measuring muscle use in the hands. The result? A parallelogram shape works best."

Link to Original Source

+ - SPAM: MyPocket - secure virtual wallet for your personal documents

Submitted by pakhandrin
pakhandrin (3681529) writes "MyPocket is a secure virtual wallet app for iPhone and iPad which allows you to store digital copy of all your personal documents, credit cards, sensitive information, scans and notes. We always forget our wallets at home. With MyPocket you can relax. All your and your family personal documents, credit cards and other data will be always at hand and securely stored on your mobile device. MyPocket contains decent and pixel-perfect templates which look like real documents.

From the first days we understood that the security of users data should be a top priority for us. That's why everything in MyPocket is encrypted using the strongest algorithm AES-256 which is used by banks, goverments and many companies to protect the TOP-secret information. This is why it is unbelievably hard or even not real to get data from MyPocket if you don't know a master password. In case if user lost his smartphone or someone stole it there is a good feature — Auto-Destroy which will erase all user's data in the app after 10 incorrect password attempts. MyPocket is safer than a wallet."

Link to Original Source

+ - 3D Bioprinting Regenerates Vincent van Gogh's Severed Ear from Relative's DNA->

Submitted by concertina226
concertina226 (2447056) writes "Artist Diemut Strebe has teamed up with scientists to create a living replica of post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh's severed ear using 3D printing and DNA from his great-great grandson.

Lieuwe van Gogh is the great-great-grandson of Vincent's brother Theo, and he shares a Y chromosome and 1/16 of the same genes with the famous painter.

Strebe and the scientists used Lieuwe's DNA samples, together with a sophisticated 3D bioprinter and computer software, to bioprint skin cells in a shape exactly resembling van Gogh's ear. The ear was then grown in the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston."

Link to Original Source

+ - Unmanaged Comments Sections are Harmful to Readers and Publications

Submitted by Lord Satri
Lord Satri (609291) writes "The title of the article might not apply to Slashdot thanks to its moderation system, but the Close your comments; Build a community article argues that allowing unmanaged comments are harmful to both readers and publishers. From the article:

"Last year, Popular Science decided to close comments, citing studies that blamed them for the spread of misinformation. TechCrunch has changed platforms several times, to Livefyre, and back to Facebook comments. [...] It’s a Petri dish that grows trolls and frightens away those who actually want to contribute. At worst, an unmoderated comments section can contain threats and personal attacks, invalid criticisms and spam. [...] Moderation goes to great lengths to fix these problems. A moderator can ban dangerous trolls, protecting equitable commenters and increasing reply rates and time-on-site between those readers. [...] So, why did you want comments in the first place? Many organizations cite “engagement,” but what they actually mean is “action.” They want to motivate their readers to do something, whether that action is clicking a share button, emailing a tip, or contributing some form of user generated content.

""

+ - Talks and presentations of the openQRM IaaS Cloud Community Summit 2014->

Submitted by matteverywhere
matteverywhere (1808476) writes "You have missed the openQRM Community Summit 2014? Now worries! For your convenience we have recorded all the talks of this event on video. They are available on youtube now!

Almost booked out the first openQRM Community Summit took place on the 20. May 2014 in Berlin. The summit started with a "get-together at the Spree" social event on the 19. May evening with perfect weather in a famous Berlin pub. The main summit day was filled with thrilling speakers and exciting talks packed with details and real-world examples of many different openQRM IaaS Cloud use-cases.
Please find the links to the videos and presentations below:

"Saas and PaaS infrastructure administration with openQRM" by Lukas Meyer (ninux.ch / Curaden IT Solutions)

"openATTIC, a software-defined storage (SDS) platform optimized for openQRM" by Steffen Rieger (Director Infrastructure & Operations it-novum GmbH)

"Short system deployment time of IT environments in large organizations" by Holger Koch (DB Systel GmbH)

"Automation of private, hybrid and multi Cloud IT infra-structures — Details about the new OpenStack integration in openQRM" by Matt Rechenburg (CEO openQRM Enterprise GmbH)

We hope you enjoy the talks!
your openQRM Team"

Link to Original Source

+ - Why is long term storage so miserably slow - even SSDs?->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Using data from the /. post earlier...about the fastest an SSD will spin data off is 550MB/s. Considering that some 8TB SSD drives are coming soon (http://gadgets.ndtv.com/laptops/news/sandisk-unveils-4tb-ssd-says-6tb-and-8tb-ssds-are-due-next-year-1-518516) — even with the speed of 550MB/s — it will take about 4 hours to spool off. Back in "the day" you could back up a system in about an hour...why hasn't the speed of mass storage kept up?"
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