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Submission + - Libya SIGINT jamming satellites, towers ( 1

h00manist writes: Libya's Gaddafi apparently loves radio hacking. Confirmed to be using signal jamming to disable Thuraya satellite phones. Also satellite TV network provider Arabsat, affecting vast areas in the Middle East, Gulf, Africa and Europe. Perhaps cellphone and internet transmissions also too, which work intermittently. Soldiers confiscate electronics, too. This has gone on for days, allowing killing carried out largely hidden from the world view, quite different from what happened in Egypt. The locations of the jamming signals is known to company executives, around capital Tripoli, but nobody can do anything. Only POTS available, and monitored. Technically, could this happen everywhere? Alternatives?

Submission + - #china revolution set to start 2pm Shanghai time ( 2

h00manist writes: Online pages call for protests in 13 cities in China, at 2:00 pm Shanghai time, 1:00 am EST, Twitter tag being used is #cn220. In spite of China censoring Middle East protests, now known as "Jasmin Revolutions", Chinese people are inspired. Instructions for participating are being censored, help re-posting is requested. They keep disappearing, and then popping up everywhere on the net, and being censored again. Yes, I used the google translated version to understand Chinese.

Submission + - Internet back on in Egypt (

h00manist writes: Internet connectivity is returning in Egypt after a historic censorship, 100% total disconnection, country-wide, for several days. The attempt to quell the protests did not work. Google's voice-call-to-twitter SayNow, dialup, ham radio, Al-Jazeera all established communication via many other channels, mixing Internet and other paths. Everyone is waiting for the exit of the dictator.

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