Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:News flash (Score 1) 103

by gweihir (#48472789) Attached to: Bitcoin Is Not Anonymous After All

Science can often mean to prove things that seem relatively obvious. In not so few cases, they then turn out to be wrong, and in the other cases they turn from speculation to fact.

Without science, we would still believe the earth was flat, and that bloodletting was a good medical procedure to cure everything. After all, these things were obvious back then.

Comment: What, car thieve are now "terrorists"? (Score 1) 109

by gweihir (#48469151) Attached to: Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

What is next? Shoplifters as terrorists? Or people that ride public transportation without a ticket?

Seriously, this is far beyond mere ridiculous. Possibly, this utter idiocy results from a deep desire to classify all hackers as "terrorists". After all, they can do things! That seems to scare the government badly.

Comment: She does have experience destroying companies... (Score 4, Informative) 393

by gweihir (#48466941) Attached to: Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Considering US Presidential Run

... that were once great. I bet she can do the same with a whole nation-state. From statements by some former HP executives, her specialty is "shoot-the-messenger", which means that she has one of the worst possible management mistakes down pat and uses it as standard operating procedure. It really does not get much worse than this.

Data Storage

How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive 424

Posted by Soulskill
from the it-was-the-SSD-in-the-enclosure-with-the-massive-IOPS dept.
itwbennett writes: For too long, it looked like SSD capacity would always lag well behind hard disk drives, which were pushing into the 6TB and 8TB territory while SSDs were primarily 256GB to 512GB. That seems to be ending. In September, Samsung announced a 3.2TB SSD drive. And during an investor webcast last week, Intel announced it will begin offering 3D NAND drives in the second half of next year as part of its joint flash venture with Micron. Meanwhile, hard drive technology has hit the wall in many ways. They can't really spin the drives faster than 7,200 RPM without increasing heat and the rate of failure. All hard drives have now is the capacity argument; speed is all gone. Oh, and price. We'll have to wait and see on that.

Whoever dies with the most toys wins.

Working...