Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Science

Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory 34

Posted by Soulskill
from the ever-smaller-ever-faster dept.
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Comment: Re:Signs clear enough even for a layman (Score 1) 534

by gweihir (#48420725) Attached to: Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

If the systemd movement was sane, that is exactly what would happen. Instead they have the total confidence and unshakable faith in their chosen fetish that otherwise only religious fanatics have. From the time I realized this, I have lost all respect for them and all motivation to argue the case: These people are not sane or rational. They do not want choice or freedom. They do not listen to arguments, no matter how accurate or justified. They want their thing to be the only thing allowed and though shalt not have any other thing. They are the enemy and must be fought.

Comment: Re:The Systemd Fiasco or Hello FreeBSD (Score 1) 534

by gweihir (#48420655) Attached to: Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

Unfortunately, you summary is accurate. I still do not understand how these people could creep in. The sheer magnitude of resistance should give them pause and reconsider whether they may be doing something wrong. Instead: Total confidence, absolutely no acknowledging of problems, no interest at all in compromise. It it is almost like arguing with religious fanatics...

Debian

Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility 534

Posted by Soulskill
from the there-will-be-peace-in-our-time dept.
paskie writes: Voting on a Debian General Resolution that would require packagers to maintain support even for systems not running systemd ended tonight with the resolution failing to gather enough support.

This means that some Debian packages could require users to run systemd on their systems in theory — however, in practice Debian still works fine without systemd (even with e.g. GNOME) and this will certainly stay the case at least for the next stable release Jessie.

However, the controversial general resolution proposed late in the development cycle opened many wounds in the community, prompting some prominent developers to resign or leave altogether, stirring strong emotions — not due to adoption of systemd per se, but because of the emotional burn-out and shortcomings in the decision processes apparent in the wake of the systemd controversy.

Nevertheless, work on the next stable release is well underway and some developers are already trying to mend the community and soothe the wounds.
The Almighty Buck

Billionaire Donors Lavish Millions On Code.org Crowdfunding Project 84

Posted by timothy
from the hey-fellas-I've-got-this-foundation-repair-project dept.
theodp (442580) writes "Whether it's winning yacht races, assembling the best computer science faculty, or even dominating high school basketball, billionaires like to win. Which may help explain why three tech billionaires — Code.org backers (and FWD.us founders) Mark Zuckerberg, VC John Doerr, and Sean Parker — stepped up to the plate and helped out Code.org's once-anemic Hour of Code Indiegogo crowdfunding project with $500k donations. When matched by Code.org's largest donors (Bill Gates, Reid Hoffman and others), the three donations alone raised $3,000,000, enough to reach the organization's goal of becoming the most funded crowdfunding campaign ever on Indiegogo. On its campaign page, Code.org remarked that "to sustain our organization for the long haul, we need to engage parents and community members," which raises questions about how reliant the K-12 learn-to-code movement might be on the kindness of its wealthy corporate and individual donors. Code.org started shedding some light on its top donors a few months back, but contributor names are blank in the 2013 IRS 990 filing posted by the organization on its website, although GuideStar suggests the biggest contributors in 2013 were Microsoft ($3,149,411) and Code.org founders Hadi and Ali Partovi ($1,873,909 in Facebook stock). Coincidentally, in a Reddit AMA at Code.org's launch, CEO and Founder Hadi Partovi noted that his next-door-neighbor is Microsoft General Counsel and Code.org Board member Brad Smith, whose FWD.us bio notes is responsible for Microsoft's philanthropic work. Just months before Code.org and FWD.us emerged on the lobbying scene, Smith announced Microsoft's National Talent Strategy, which called for "an increase in developing the American STEM pipeline in exchange for these new [H-1B] visas and green cards," a wish that President Obama is expected to grant shortly via executive action."

The reason why worry kills more people than work is that more people worry than work.

Working...