Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Test the Attachments (Score 1) 238

This is already reality. So called "red pills" allow malware to find out if its are running in an emulator or virtual machine.

Here's a paper that describes automatically generating such red pills:

"A fistful of red-pills: how to automatically generate procedures to detect cpu emulators" by R. Paleari, L. Martignoni, G. F. Roglia, and D. Bruschi
https://www.usenix.org/legacy/event/woot09/tech/full_papers/paleari.pdf

The authors found more than 23k red-pills to detect QEMU and/or BOCHS.

Comment: Re:Where's your $50,000? (Score 2) 1799

by guusbosman (#37672614) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Do You View the Wall Street Protests?
Let's look at what page 131 of the GAO report says about Table 8 (http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d11696.pdf).

First of all, these are loans, not bailouts.

Second, for at least half of the amount (the PDFC loans), the number is highly inflated: "For example, an overnight PDCF loan of $10 billion that was renewed daily at the same level for 30 business days would result in an aggregate amount borrowed of $300 billion although the institution, in effect, borrowed only $10 billion over 30 days."

+ - The legal meaning of "strictly random"-> 1

Submitted by guusbosman
guusbosman (151671) writes "Yesterday a district court in Washington, D.C. issued its ruling in a case that boiled down to the definition of "strictly random".

In the 2011 drawing of the U.S. "Green Card Lottery', a computer programming error was made and two weeks after the official drawing of the lottery the Department of State closed the website and voided the results.

A lawsuit sought an injunction claiming that, while the process was not mathematically random, it was random in the dictionary definition of âoewithout definite aim, direction, rule or method". The court, analyzing language from the State Departmentâ(TM)s regulations, and examples from laws on casinos and the like, rejected that and came out in favor of a mathematical definition of randomness. The lottery is voided and the results of the new drawing came out today at noon EST."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Similar work in a December 2010 paper (Score 2) 156

by guusbosman (#36255898) Attached to: Chapel Hill Computational Linguists Crack Skype Calls
A December 2010 paper, "Uncovering Spoken Phrases in Encrypted Voice over IP Conversations", takes a similar approach.

The article was published in ACM Transactions on Information and System Security, PDF version.

The paper details a gap in the security of VBR compressed encrypted VoIP streams. The authors had earlier found that it is possible to determine the language that is spoken on such a VoIP call, based on packet lengths. Now they have expanded their research and show that itâ(TM)s possible to detect entire spoken phrases during a VoIP call. On average, their method achieved recall of 50% and precision of 51% for a wide variety of phrases spoken by a diverse collection of speakers (some phrases are easier to detect than others; the recall various from 0% to 98%, depending on length of the phrase and the speaker). In other words: they can detect fairly well if a certain phrase is being used in a conversation, even though the VoIP conversation is encrypted.
Image

The World's Smallest Legible Font 280

Posted by samzenpus
from the because-he-can dept.
hasanabbas1987 writes "From the article: 'Well 'technically' they aren't the smallest fonts in the world as if they were you wouldn't be able to read even a single letter, but, you should be able to read the entire paragraph in the picture given above... we did. A Computer science professor called Ken Perlin designed these tiny fonts and you can fit 500 reasonable words in a resolution of 320 x 240 space. There are at the moment the smallest legible fonts in the world.'"
Biotech

Lizard Previously Unknown To Science Found On Vietnam Menu 133

Posted by samzenpus
from the try-the-bigfoot-burger dept.
eldavojohn writes "A lizard long served on the menu in the Mekong Delta has recently caught the attention of scientists when it was noted that all animals in the species appeared identical as well as female. The species appears to be a hybrid of two other species (like a mule or liger). But the curious thing is that this hybrid isn't sterile — it reproduces asexually. The species, known for some time in Vietnam, has now officially been named Leiolepis ngovantrii."
Medicine

Americans Less Healthy, But Outlive Brits 521

Posted by timothy
from the cross-cultural-croaking-comparison dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this intriguing snippet: "Older Americans are less healthy than their English counterparts, but they live as long or even longer than their English peers, according to a new study by researchers from the RAND Corporation and the Institute for Fiscal Studies in London. Researchers found that while Americans aged 55 to 64 have higher rates of chronic diseases than their peers in England, they died at about the same rate. And Americans age 65 and older — while still sicker than their English peers — had a lower death rate than similar people in England, according to findings published in the journal Demography."
Crime

Thief Returns Stolen Laptop Contents On USB Stick 352

Posted by samzenpus
from the it's-been-a-pleasure-being-your-victim dept.
While it's true that Sweden is responsible for unleashing IKEA and ABBA on humanity, not everything they produce is terrible. Their thieves are some of the most considerate in the world. An unnamed professor at Umeå University received a USB stick with all his data after his laptop was stolen. From the article: "The professor, who teaches at Umeå University in northern Sweden, was devastated when ten years of work stored on his laptop was stolen. But to his surprise, a week after the theft, the entire contents of his laptop were posted to him on a USB stick. 'I am very happy,' the unnamed professor told the local Västerbottens-Kuriren newspaper. 'This story makes me feel hope for humanity.'"
Earth

New Fish Species Discovered 4.5 Miles Under the Ocean 96

Posted by Soulskill
from the how-does-it-taste dept.
eldavojohn writes "The University of Aberdeen's Oceanlab (a partner in the recent census of marine life) has discovered a new snailfish. That might not sound very exciting, unless you consider that its habitat is an impressive four and a half miles below the ocean's surface (video). If my calculations are correct, that's over ten and a half thousand PSI, or about seventy-three million Pascals. The videos and pictures are a couple years old, as the team has traveled around Japan, South America and New Zealand to ascertain the biodiversity of these depths. The group hopes to eventually bring specimens to the surface. It seems the deepest parts of the ocean, once thought to be devoid of life, are actually home to some organisms. As researchers build better technology for underwater exploration, tales of yore containing unimaginable monsters seem a little more realistic than before."

Comment: Re:Waiting for a capable PostgreSQL front-end (Score 5, Informative) 344

by guusbosman (#33644088) Attached to: PostgreSQL 9.0 Released

You know that you can point your MS Access client to any supported back-end right? Just create an ODBC connection on your Windows machine to your PostgreSQL server and you can use Access with pretty much all the features that work for the Microsoft JetEngine (PostgreSQL has ODBC drivers here; http://www.postgresql.org/ftp/odbc/versions/)

Earlier this year we converted a huge Access application from MSSQL to PostgreSQL and the technical conversion, using ODBC to PostgreSQL instead of connecting to MSSQL, was a piece of cake.

Microsoft

Child Abuse Verdict Held Back By MS Word Glitch 191

Posted by samzenpus
from the messy-verdict dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Last week several defendants including one high-profile TV presenter were sentenced in Portugal in what has been known as the Casa Pia scandal. The judges delivered on September 3 a summary of the 2000-page verdict, which would be disclosed in full only three days later. The disclosure of the full verdict has been postponed from September 8 to a yet-to-be-announced date, allegedly because the full document was written in several MS Word files which, when merged together, retained 'computer related annotations which should not be present in any legal document.' (Google translated article.) Microsoft specialists were called in to help the judges sort out the 'text formatting glitch,' while the defendants and their lawyers eagerly wait to access the full text of the verdict."
Google

Google Caffeine Drops MapReduce, Adds "Colossus" 65

Posted by samzenpus
from the time-to-upgrade dept.
An anonymous reader writes "With its new Caffeine search indexing system, Google has moved away from its MapReduce distributed number crunching platform in favor of a setup that mirrors database programming. The index is stored in Google's BigTable distributed database, and Caffeine allows for incremental changes to the database itself. The system also uses an update to the Google File System codenamed 'Colossus.'"
Image

Town Gets Patent On Being the Center of Europe 169

Posted by samzenpus
from the continental-drift-be-damned dept.
An anonymous reader writes "And you thought software patents were going to far? How about geography patents? Apparently, as a part of the weird fight over what place in Europe represents the 'geophysical center of Europe,' the Austrian town of Frauenkirchen has received a patent (Austrian patent AM 7738/2003) declaring it the center of Europe. Not clear how one 'infringes' on such a patent, but then again, it's not clear why anyone's patenting this either."
Image

Geek Squad Sends Cease-and-Desist Letter To God Squad 357

Posted by samzenpus
from the who-would-jesus-sue dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A Wisconsin priest has God on his car but Best Buy's lawyers on his back. Father Luke Strand at the Holy Family Parish in Fond Du Lac says he has received a cease-and-desist letter from the electronics retailer. From the article: 'At issue is Strand's black Volkswagen Beetle with door stickers bearing the name "God Squad" in a logo similar to that of Best Buy's Geek Squad, a group of electronics troubleshooters. Strand told the Fond du Lac Reporter that the car is a creative way to spur discussion and bring his faith to others. Best Buy Co. tells the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that it appreciates what Strand is trying to do, but it's bad precedent to let groups violate its trademarks.'"
Science

Your Feces Is a Wonderland of Viruses 211

Posted by timothy
from the and-so-can-you dept.
sciencehabit writes "Thanks to an anlaysis of fecal samples from four sets of Missouri-born female identical twins and their mothers, researchers have concluded that human guts harbor viruses as unique as the people they inhabit; the viral lineup differs even between identical twins. Even more surprising? These viruses may be doing good work inside of us."

How often I found where I should be going only by setting out for somewhere else. -- R. Buckminster Fuller

Working...