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Comment: Re:True, in a sense... (Score 1) 124 124

I might also mention that while I have a camera in my smart phones, I prefer my point and shoot or DSLR.

While the current gen of phones do take pictures perhaps even better than the point and shoots of old they aren't really up to snuff relative to the current gen of point and shoots, the GoPro. Also, neither can touch the DSLR for image quality. But the DSLR is really heavy and expensive enough that you have to think about theft whenever you have it outside of the house, so it's a real pain.

Comment: Re:True, in a sense... (Score 2) 124 124

I think it's really interesting how I'm moderated for this. 50% interesting 30% overrated and 20% troll. There is a lot of passion here about me being wrong.

Or perhaps it's the /. revulsion to having Windows take over. Pretty bad, in my mind, but the only thing worse would be Andriod with its total lack of privacy controls.

Comment: Re:True, in a sense... (Score 2, Interesting) 124 124

The Internet of Things is something Bill Gates wrote about 20 years ago and it's about as close to reality as it was then. The real issue is that we need an embeddable computer that runs Windows (don't laugh, it's what people know) and costs about $0.05, maybe $0.25 is good enough, but I doubt it. Then We'll start to see the Internet of Things take off.

I have literally zero things that are not internet enabled that I wish were internet enabled. If someone offered me an enabled and non-enabled device I'd take the non-enabled device every time. It's one fewer thing to break and my device is that much less likely to get hacked and broken.

So, basically, it will have to get to the point where everything is enabled for me to buy these things. That will happen when a computer costs basically nothing $0.05 is basically nothing.

Comment: Re:Just use OpenBSD, for crying out loud! (Score 1) 91 91

There are several other problems.

1) When you come back to enter more data and expect the fields to be populated (the form takes a day or two to fill out the first time).
2) When you need access to something and the manager of that element has to look at your file to approve it.
3) When you get a new security manager and they have to approve it.

Your basically taking us back to the paper office days. In that time it was really easy to not put two and two together because cross referencing information was really hard.

Comment: Re:Codeword (Score 1) 479 479

You have the wrong ISP. Here are how my recent calls to my ISP have gone:

Me: Hi, I can't get online.
Them: Your area is up, can we stop by in 10 minutes and check out your equipment. (when they arrive they have one of everything in the car and will replace anything I ask them to replace even if they disagree with my diagnosis.)

OR

Me: I don't seem to be getting the stated speed on this line.
Them: Sorry about that. Can you run the speed test again and tell me the results?
Me: Yeah, it's a little over now.
Them: Anything else I can help you with today?

It's a local ISP that serves a very limited geographic area and it's great.

Comment: Re: It's going to be painful... (Score 1) 176 176

Am I confused, is this the bug tracker for google maps?

Nevertheless...

google maps doesn't get me where I'm going. It takes me the wrong way on one ways, gives me directions to use roads that either don't exist or are not labeled with the name google is feeding me. In the online version, once I've entered google maps page, anything that requires a click requires quite a bit of thought and searching for how to do it.

Comment: Re: It's going to be painful... (Score 2) 176 176

Google is really good at search and keeps getting better.

But everything else they do is just awful. Maps, broken and their too stubborn to fix it to what it used to be; android is a mess, my moto G is about 1/2 as fast AT BEST for the MLB app relative to my iPhone, most apps crash every few days, and only one app makes any intuitive sense to me (the google app, love it) whereas about 80% of my iPhone apps make sense right away, plus privacy is just a list of demands and no most of my apps can turn on the camera without asking or even telling me since the "simplified" the permissions interface; google+, 'nuf said; google docs is OK for scheduling when you don't share calendar software, but that comes up only every once in awhile.

Anyways, many tech firms are really just one idea that, once played out, is just done.

It is easier to write an incorrect program than understand a correct one.

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