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Submission Summary: 1 pending, 134 declined, 16 accepted (151 total, 10.60% accepted)

Submission People are worse for wildlife than even radiation poisoning->

grrlscientist writes: People were evacuated after the Chernobyl accident, but what happened to the local wildlife? A new study shows that wildlife in the Chernobyl disaster zone is thriving, indicating that the presence of humans is more damaging to wildlife and to ecosystems than is radiation poisoning
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Submission The enemy of my enemy is my friend->

grrlscientist writes: Tiny hummingbird eggs and babies are a favourite snack for nest-robbing jays, so what’s a mother hummingbird to do to protect her family? According to a study published recently in the journal, Science Advances, the hummingbird cleverly builds her nest near or under a hawk nest. The reason for this seemingly risky behaviour? When hawks are nesting nearby, jays forage higher above the ground to avoid being attacked from above by the hungry hawk parents. This elevation in the jays’ foraging height creates a cone-shaped jay-free safe area under the hawk nests where mother hummingbirds, their babies and nests, enjoy dramatically increased survival rates.
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Submission Birds reveal evolutionary importance of love->

grrlscientist writes: A new study finds that birds who freely choose their own mates have 37 percent more offspring than those which were paired up by researchers in a sort of avian ‘arranged marriage’ — findings that have far-reaching implications for conservation and captive breeding practices
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Submission White sky at night not a city bird's delight->

grrlscientist writes: Free-living songbirds show increased stress hormone levels when nesting under white street lights. But different light spectra may have different physiological effects as this study finds, suggesting that using street lights with specific colour spectra may mitigate effects of light pollution on wildlife
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Submission Life history trade-offs: why tropical songbirds have fewer chicks->

grrlscientist writes: Tropical songbirds produce fewer, high-quality nestlings per breeding effort than do songbirds that breed in temperate zones, according to a study published today. This study reports that tropical songbirds’ nestlings grow longer wings, and faster, which means they spend less time in the nest where they are vulnerable to predators
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Submission Ribbiting news: venomous frogs discovered in Brazil->

grrlscientist writes: A team of scientists have identified two species of venomous frogs, a unexpected discovery. While a number of frogs have toxins in their skin and thus are considered poisonous, the term “venomous” is reserved for animals, such as pit vipers, that can inject their toxins into other animals.
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Submission Are hurricanes more deadly than himmicanes?->

grrlscientist writes: A recently published paper claims that the gender of the name given to individual hurricanes is linked to the public's perception of the risk posed by that storm. In short, this study claims that hurricanes given female-sounding names are perceived to be less dangerous than those given male-sounding names (which we refer to here as "himmicanes"). This public underestimation of risk apparently results in hurricanes causing significantly more deaths than himmicanes. We reanalyse the data and find there is no relationship between hurricane name-gender and deaths caused.
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Submission Open and shut: These brainy birds open their own doors->

grrlscientist writes: When the University of Victoria in Canada opened a new campus bike centre in the parkade located under the University Centre last November, motion-activated doors were installed to discourage swallows from nesting in the new facility. But when the swallows returned to their familiar nest sites a few weeks ago, they were undeterred by this peculiar impediment: they quickly learned how to open the doors by flying in front of the infrared motion detector.
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Submission Half-siders: A tale of two birdies->

grrlscientist writes: Chimæras have been big in the news recently. Also known as "halfsiders" or tetragametic chimæras, these unusual animals (or humans!) are actually two genetically distinct individuals — twins — fused into one being. This science news story explores how this accident of nature occurs.
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Submission http://gu.com/p/3tzxq/tw ->

grrlscientist writes: In this cool story, we learn that, addition to the amazing revelation that whales have earwax (!!), a team of researchers in the United States just published a paper detailing a new method that they developed for measuring a whale's lifetime exposure to a wide variety of chemicals pollutants — by studying their earwax!
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Theory is gray, but the golden tree of life is green. -- Goethe