Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Comment Re:Lots of comments on's coverage (Score 2, Informative) 354

Might be rather hard to "clean up". Back in 2008 Mathew Garret wrote:

Google was going to be an interesting case of a large company hiring people both from the embedded world and also the existing Linux development community and then producing an embedded device that was intended to compete with the very best existing platforms. I had high hopes that this combination of factors would result in the Linux community as a whole having a better idea what the constraints and requirements for high-quality power management in the embedded world were, rather than us ending up with another pile of vendor code sitting on an FTP site somewhere in Taiwan that implements its power management by passing tokenised dead mice through a wormhole.

To a certain extent, my hopes were fulfilled. We got a git server in California.

Comment Re:Economy - anything else is a waste (Score 1) 549

Some good tips. I have some noise cancelling 'phones and I find them quite good for relaxing. Some people don't get on with them (the noise cancelling creates a slightly odd sensation of pressure in the ear) but I love them.

I forgot eye masks too, but as you say they are a good idea. Virgin give you them for free.

Comment Re:One sentence to say it all... (Score 2, Informative) 354

How is this +5 informative? It's completely false.

The reason it didn't make it to mainline is because the Google code was reviewed and found to have problems that stopped it being accepted into mainline. Because there are user space items in Android that would be affected, only Google could make the changes without breaking Android.

Think about it, if you were unable to build the Android kernel because Google were withholding stuff, it would be in direct violation of GPL v2. Do you see Greg KH complaining that Android violates the Linux licence? No.


Submission + - London buses to get atheist posters 3

jd 0001 writes: The BBC are reporting that "Bendy-buses with the slogan 'There's probably no God' could soon be running on the streets of London. The atheist posters are the idea of the British Humanist Association (BHA) and have been supported by prominent atheist Professor Richard Dawkins. The BHA planned only to raise £5,500, which was to be matched by Professor Dawkins, but it has now raised more than £36,000 of its own accord. " The donations page was showing a total of nearly £40K the last time I looked. How long before something similar comes to the US?

The Next Browser Scripting Language Is — C? 375

mad.frog writes to tell us that in a recent talk by Adobe's Scott Petersen he demonstrated a new toolchain that he has been working on (and soon to be open-sourced) that allows C code to be run by the Tamarin virtual machine. "The toolchain includes lots of other details, such as a custom POSIX system call API and a C multimedia library that provides access to Flash. And there's some things that Petersen had to add to Tamarin, such as a native byte array that maps directly to RAM, thereby allowing the VM's "emulation" of memory to have only a minor overhead over the real thing. The end result is the ability to run a wide variety of existing C code in Flash at acceptable speeds. Petersen demonstrated a version of Quake running in a Flash app, as well as a C-based Nintendo emulator running Zelda; both were eminently playable, and included sound effects and music."

First DNA Molecule Constructed from Mostly Synthetic Components 188

ScienceDaily is reporting that Japanese chemists have created the world's first DNA molecule comprised of almost entirely artificial components. The breakthrough could lead to advances in both medicine and technology, possibly utilizing the massive storage capacity of DNA. "In the new study, Masahiko Inouye and colleagues point out that scientists have tried for years to develop artificial versions of DNA in order to extend its amazing information storage capabilities. As the genetic blueprint of all life forms, DNA uses the same set of four basic building blocks, known as bases, to code for a variety of proteins used in cell functioning and development. Until now, scientists have only been able to craft DNA molecules with one or a few artificial parts, including certain bases."

Theory is gray, but the golden tree of life is green. -- Goethe