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+ - Vinyl Record Pressing Plants Struggle to Keep Up With Demand

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The WSJ reports that the revival of vinyl records, a several-year trend that many figured was a passing fad, has accelerated during 2014 with an astounding 49 percent sales increase over 2013 (line chart here). Some listeners think that vinyl reproduces sound better than digital, and some youngsters like the social experience of gathering around a turntable. The records are pressed at a handful of decades-old, labor-intensive factories that can't keep up with the demand; but since the increased sales still represent only about 2 percent of US music sales, there hasn't been a rush of capital investment to open new plants. Raw vinyl must now be imported to America from countries such as Thailand, since the last US supplier closed shop years ago. Meanwhile, an industry pro offers his take on the endless debate of audio differences between analog records and digital formats; it turns out there were reasons for limiting playing time on each side back in the day, apart from bands not having enough decent material."

Comment: Re:Not sure who to cheer for (Score 1) 190

by greenfruitsalad (#48570963) Attached to: Fraud Bots Cost Advertisers $6 Billion

what if he really doesn't look at porn? then he certainly wouldn't notice 99% of the web disappearing.

by using opendns, i have practically eliminated that much web on my home network. what else is there? news, lolcatz, epic fail videos, social networks, corporate websites and wikipedia. well under 1% of the web.

+ - New Apps Mark the Digital Return of the Rhythm Method

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Count natural family planning among the ways young people are hearkening back to the practices of their grandparents as Olga Khazan reports at The Atlantic that new apps are letting women know if they can have sex with their partners without a condom or a contraceptive pill using calendar-based contraception. The underlying motive is not so much trendiness as it is a dissatisfaction with the Pill, which is still the most common form of birth control for women. In a recent CDC study of 12,000 American women, 63 percent of women who stopped using the Pill did so due to its side effects (PDF). And while as of 2010, only about 22 percent of women used “periodic abstinence," an umbrella term that includes counting days, measuring temperature, and tracking cervical mucus to predict fertility, their ranks may grow as new apps and other technologies make it easier to manage the historically error-prone task of measuring, recording, and analyzing one’s cycle in order to stay baby-free.

CycleBeads, for example, is an iPhone app that allows women to track fertility based on the Standard Days Method, a system developed by Georgetown University's Institute for Reproductive Health in which specific days of each woman’s cycle are considered infertile. While the method is not as effective for women who have cycles outside of the 26-32 day range, Leslie Heyer says that its success rate is about 95 percent for “perfect use” and 88 percent for “typical use,” which would mean it beats condoms and falls just short of the Pill. “At first [my husband and I] were worried,” says Kate, a woman who began using CycleBeads nearly three years ago after experiencing weight gain and moodiness on the Pill, “but then we got used to it and have grown to trust it. I honestly can't imagine ever going back on the Pill.”"

+ - $35 Quad-core Hacker SBC Offers Raspberry Pi-like Size And I/O->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Hardkernel has again set its sites on the Raspberry Pi with a new $35 Odroid-C1 hacker board that matches the RPI's board size and offers a mostly similar 40-pin expansion connector. Unlike the previous $30 Odroid-W that used the same Broadcom BCM2835 SoC as the Pi and was soon cancelled due to lack of BCM2835 SoC availability, the Odroid-C1 is based on a quad-core 1.5GHz Cortex-A5 based Amlogic S805 SoC, which integrates the Mali-400 GPU found on Allwinner's popular SoCs. Touted advantages over the similarly priced Raspberry Pi Model B+ include a substantially more powerful processor, double the RAM, a extra USB2.0 port that adds Device/OTG, and GbE rather than 10/100 Ethernet. More info is at Odroid-C1 product page."
Link to Original Source

+ - US Braces for Backlash from Torture Report

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "The NYT reports that with the release of the long-awaited Senate report on the use of torture by the United States government — a detailed account that will shed an unsparing light on the Central Intelligence Agency’s darkest practices after the September 2001 terrorist attacks, the US is bracing itself for the risk that it will set off a backlash overseas. Some leading Republican lawmakers have warned against releasing the report, saying that domestic and foreign intelligence reports indicate that a detailed account of the brutal interrogation methods used by the CIA during the George W. Bush administration could incite unrest and violence, even resulting in the deaths of Americans. The White House acknowledged that the report could pose a “greater risk” to American installations and personnel in countries like Pakistan, Yemen, Egypt, Libya and Iraq. But it said that the government had months to plan for the reverberations from its report — indeed, years — and that those risks should not delay the release of the report by the Senate Intelligence Committee. “When would be a good time to release this report?” the White House press secretary, Josh Earnest, asked. “It’s difficult to imagine one, particularly given the painful details that will be included.”

Among the administration’s concerns is that terrorist groups will exploit the disclosures in the report for propaganda value. The Islamic State already clads its American hostages in orange jumpsuits, like those worn by prisoners in CIA interrogations. Hostages held by the Islamic State in Syria were subjected to waterboarding, one of the practices used by the CIA to extract information from suspected terrorists. The 480-page document reveals the results of Senate investigation into the CIA's use of torture and other techniques that violate international law against prisoners held on terrorism-related charges. Though many details of the Senate's findings will remain classified – the document is a summary of a 6,000-page report that is not being released – the report is expected to conclude that the methods used by the CIA to interrogate prisoners during the post-9/11 years were more extreme than previously admitted and produced no intelligence that could not have been acquired through legal means."

Comment: Re:Come on people, (Score 1) 96

I find juniper's config mode and config file structure rather beautiful. As for their cli syntax, I don't actually see it as very different from cisco's.

if you want to clear arp cache, it makes sense that that's the actual command. no sane company would have "please make forgettings ...." or similar nonsense.

but anyway, did cisco really invent this cli syntax type? there's the Unix way of "command -x=1 -y=2 object" and there's the OpenVMS way of "command specifier anotherspecifier object". I don't think cisco can ever claim to have invented this non-unixlike cli.

i've never worked with anything older than openvms, so it's possible there's even more prior art.

+ - American Intelligence Agencies Building New Superconducting Supercomputer->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "UPI reports, "The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, a branch of the U.S. intelligence community, said in a press release that the agency has embarked on a multi-year research effort called the Cryogenic Computer Complexity program, or C3. Current supercomputing utilizes technology that relies on tens of megawatts and requires large amounts of physical space to house the infrastructure and power and cool the components. C3 hopes to use recent breakthroughs in supercomputing technologies ... to construct a superconducting supercomputer with "a simplified cooling infrastructure and a greatly reduced footprint." "The power, space, and cooling requirements for current supercomputers ... are becoming unmanageable," said Marc Manheimer, C3 program manager at IARPA. ... The international intelligence community has been competing to outpace each other and build the first computer to break the exaFLOP barrier for some time, but scaling out contemporary CMOS technologies to construct computers capable of exaFLOP calculations would require hundreds of megawatts to power, necessitating an energy source with an output equal to that of a single small nuclear reactor. ... Currently the record for single computer speed is China's Tianhe-2, ranked the world's fastest with a record of 33.86 petaFLOPS in June of 2013 ... In his 2008 book, The Shadow Factory, best-selling author and journalist James Bamford reported that the NSA told the Pentagon it would need an exaFLOP computer by 2018 ..." — More at Defense Systems."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re: This is news, how exactly? (Score 4, Insightful) 187

by greenfruitsalad (#48295881) Attached to: Denuvo DRM Challenges Game Crackers

i have an artificial ceiling on game prices. i am mentally unable to convince myself a game can be worth more than 9.99 no matter what. and even that is only for an AAA title or good flight simulator. fortunately, i've grown out of impatience long ago and don't mind buying the likes of Crysis 3 a year or 2 after release.

last year I decided to see what this steam thing was and installed it on my linux machine. it was during their christmas game sale. a LOT of slightly dated AAA (windows) games went for 3 - 9.99. now here's the thing. at those prices i bought around 40 games, most of which i later decided i didn't like and only played a few minutes of and some of them i never even installed. and at those prices, i didn't care!

but paying 60+ dollars for a game? simply NEVER GONNA HAPPEN!!! incompatible with a healthy human brain. distributors need to realise that for every sucker who pays, there are 100s willing to pay a sensible price (not steal). and for each of those, there are even more willing to buy it as a hmmm i'll play it when kids grow up for a dollar or two.

+ - Denuvo DRM Challenges Game Crackers

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "Now that the PC gaming community has grown very large, it has become only a matter of hours before the copy protection of a major AAA title is cracked and put up for download after its official release, or sometimes, even before. However, it looks like CI Games is having great luck with its recently launched next-gen video game known as Lords of the Fallen, as its PC DRM still remains uncracked now after 3 days of release. The DRM solution that the game uses comes from a copyright protection company known as Denuvo, and it is apparently the same one that has been used in FIFA 15, which is also yet uncracked. While this DRM has kept the game from being pirated until now, it has also been speculated that this solution is supposedly the main cause behind several in-game bugs and crashes that are affecting users' gameplay experience. To improve stability, the developer is working on a patch that is aimed at fixing all performance issues. It remains officially unconfirmed if the new DRM solution is really causing all the glitches."

Comment: Re:Phone Case? (Score 3, Interesting) 63

by greenfruitsalad (#48286341) Attached to: LG's 0.7mm Smartphone Bezel Is World's Narrowest

how will this work with fingers? i had a phone with narrow bezel (galaxy s4) and could not use it. it always assumed i was tapping the sides of screen with my palm, thumb, etc.. there was just no non-interfering way of holding it securely. when i got a case for it, the opposite happened - i could not tap on anything close to the edge. i got rid of it.

"Probably the best operating system in the world is the [operating system] made for the PDP-11 by Bell Laboratories." - Ted Nelson, October 1977

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