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Comment: Re:Wrong assumption (Score 5, Insightful) 460

by OrangeTide (#48676985) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

Luckily for my country, most of people can be swayed by money. Big salary, and low taxes and houses with a big yard as still affordable for a professional.

Brain drain is vitally important to America's future, these ideological games being played by xenophobes and people with anti-immigration politics may result in some very serious long term consequences. (yes, I'm basically stating that we cheat to stay on top.)

A nation that is manufacturing less every year, and has zero growth in agriculture, but continues to have a significant population growth needs to have a plan for the future.

As for people who are worried we'll [continue to] hire armies of cheap labor under H1B visa program, I would much rather compete with a foreign worker who is located in the US, than compete with that same worker in his own country. At least he's paying taxes and rent here, and spending some of his money in the local economy. If they decide to apply for citizenship, I welcome them. We can complain about elections and jury duty together.

Comment: Re:Again... (Score 1) 212

by OrangeTide (#48655629) Attached to: Cyberattack On German Steel Factory Causes 'Massive Damage'

The nation's economy collapsed because the steel factory shut down? Some equipment was damaged, maybe they should have insurance for that?
Possibly there should be a worry would be injuries or deaths, so in that context security is of an important safety concern.

It's not on the same scale as collapsing the power grid for millions of people, businesses, and hospitals. Or tying up world wide credit processing for weeks, which would have some serious economy consequences.

Comment: Re:Offline archive? (Score 1) 156

by OrangeTide (#48622325) Attached to: Dr. Dobb's 38-Year Run Comes To an End

Well, I follow pcc development pretty closely and still use it for a few small projects.

To be sure there are some pretty significant advancements in compiler design that are important for someone who is working on a compiler in a professional or research capacity. But for me it was more of an exercise in understanding enough to hack a little bit on pcc, lcc and now llvm. I really only got as far as graph coloring for register allocators, and type inference for non-C ML-like language (a flawed approximation of HM type inference).

Some people are moving back to hand written compilers, at least hand written recursive descent parsers in place of compiler generators like yacc/bison. My own experiments formalized the grammar with PEG to generate and confirm test cases, then hand written recursive descent from the PEG (very easy to do).

I don't think I hand optimize C to suit some ancient assumptions of what a compiler can do. A modern C compiler can do a lot of amazing substitutions to turn a well organized set of small functions into a very fast monolithic block of machine code.

These days, pretty much the best thing when writing C is to avoid doing things that are undefined so the compiler can do optimization instead of falling back to some legacy behavior hacked into it.

Comment: The message has been clear (Score 2) 435

by OrangeTide (#48619277) Attached to: In Breakthrough, US and Cuba To Resume Diplomatic Relations

We've proven to the world that we are willing to significantly impact the economy of a small island nation for over 50 years because they cooperated with our enemies.

Despite Cuba having an excellent education system, most people there live in poverty. Is that the Cuban government's fault, or because the door to the largest marketplace was slammed shut on them?

It's not all rainbows and unicorns, most Cuban immigrants over the years expressed serious dissatisfaction with Castro's government. Maybe the people that stayed behind were happy with it, but I suspect it has more to do with circumstances preventing those people from leaving than an acceptance of their government.

Comment: Re:Offline archive? (Score 4, Interesting) 156

by OrangeTide (#48613297) Attached to: Dr. Dobb's 38-Year Run Comes To an End

I ordered the current DVD up to 2009, so I have at least some of the articles. I still occasionally go back to old articles because a lot of the software I do hasn't changed much in decades. (Unix and embedded)

Several years ago I ordered the CD collection of Small C articles, and found it pretty useful for grasping the essentials of compiler design. Even if the information is decades old, it was still relevant for the fundamentals of how C compiling and linking works. (at least on Unix/Linux, which is based on decades old designs)

Comment: Re:Paying for studies (Score 1) 280

by OrangeTide (#48612713) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Should a Liberal Arts Major Get Into STEM?

Well hopefully the organization handing you a degree has done some work to verify that you are qualified to have that degree.

Some degrees are better defined than others, and having a degree doesn't mean you're immediately qualified to perform a job. For example an M.D. would need to go through a residency program before they a qualified to hold a medical license to practice unsupervised.

While Software Engineer is so poorly defined that it's difficult to determine what skills were acquired by a person with such a degree. But it's very common in the technology industry for a person to perform the same function as a software engineer but with a different degree. There are a lot of people with a degree in B.S. in Mathematics or B.S.E.E. that operate as software engineers. Occasionally you find an odd ball working as a software engineer that has a B.A. with a major in English literature (citing a specific example), or someone who dropped out of college or high school.

Comment: Coffee percolator (Score 2) 270

by OrangeTide (#48576637) Attached to: Keurig 2.0 Genuine K-Cup Spoofing Vulnerability

I've had better coffee from a coffee percolator than from a K-Cup. It's simpler too, if you have one with a mesh screen you don't need filters and easily rinses out if you don't leave the coffee in it all day. Else you can scrub it out with a long handled brush when it starts smelling like old coffee. (for me the percolator coffee seems to do the best job at high altitude, start boiling at about 92C for me)

Since K-Cup's can't make espresso (not enough enough pressure), no need to compare it to a proper espresso machine. It's simply an elaborate drip coffee maker. A $30 Mr. Coffee from Costco will also make a fine drip coffee. You can use expensive unbleached compostable paper filters if you want, they're still a few percent of what each K-Cup costs.

My compost pile loves used coffee grounds.

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