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Comment Just a consumer version, not really new (Score 4, Informative) 153

Businesses have used these things for years, especially for heavy trucks but my company sedan has one. My company gets a healthy break on insurance rates because it's there, and they get a nifty web interface where they can pull up everyone's real-time location. Some people find it intrusive but it's kind of hard to complain since it's their car and they pay for the gas. The reporting does include sketchy errors, so it's best not to trust the warning reports too much unless there's a clear pattern. It doesn't always know the real speed limit and sometimes the GPS thinks you're in a very different place than you really are.

Comment Re:It could work. (Score 0) 682

It's not a theory, it's the truth.

In fact the mkLinux you mention was originally a port done by two guys named Mark and Karl, hence "mk".

Steve Jobs saw Slackware on a CD and, being that he wanted to see the floppy disk die, he chose that distro to port as Mac OSX. Most other distros at that point were still on floppy disk. Woz and Seymour Cray were drinking buddies so when they needed some high performance multi-threading support from Cray's UNICOS system, Woz tapped his pal and got access to the necessary code for a handshake rather than the usual multi-million dollar licensing fees.

The whole "NeXTSTEP" thing was to fool investors into thinking they had a solid product, not something they hacked out over a few weeks. In fact if you do any development on Mac OSX or iOS, you will see "ns_____" things called all the time. The "ns" does not mean "NextStep" as many people think. It means "Nice Seymour" as a tip of the hat to the man that made all that code available for free.

I remember all this like it was yesterday.

Comment Re:It could work. (Score 0) 682

Nope. OSX is a fork/mix of early Slackware Linux with some earlier Cray UNICOS multi-threading library support.

NeXTSTEP is based on AT&T SysV UNIX with graphical libraries borrowed from Ashton-Tate's (ahead of its time) Framework suite. If memory serves I think they also uses some of CP/M's successor MP/M 86 for some sweet multiuser stuff.

I remember it all like it was yesterday!

Comment Re:It could work. (Score 2) 682

Good thing you mentioned Apple's OSX, I forgot about that one in my well-researched history.

OSX is a fork of Linux, Slackware specifically, which itself is some original old Linux code with some Cray UNICOS bolted on for what was then some decent HPC.

Comment It could work. (Score 5, Funny) 682

Remember that forks sometimes do succeed.

Take Linux. It forked from OpenBSD which itself was forked from QNX with smatterings of FreeBSD code.

QNX programmed itself from vacuum tubes and trace wires left on the ground at Quantum Software in Ottawa one evening. Dan Hildebrand (RIP) apparently had something to do with this metamorphosis.

Meanwhile across the ocean, FreeBSD was forked from Windows 95 which itself came from the unholy union of MS-DOS and the GEM environment. MS-DOS was bought from a company in Washington State and was a fork of CP/M. GEM was a stand alone thing and should never have been born.

Where was I? Oh yeah, CP/M. CP/M was a copy of Apple's SOS used in the Apple /// series of super-powerful business computers. The source code was left at an airport where Gary Kildall read it when his plane was on auto-pilot.

Apple SOS was a mix/fork of Apple ProDOS and TRS-80's OS; I forget the name, not important. Radio Shack forked their TRS-80 OS from some source code they saw in Lions' Commentary on UNIX 6th Edition.


Comment Re:Why don't taxis just provide good service?! (Score 1) 135

The medallions avoid a couple things,
- drivers charging on a hail unsafely then haggling over who can carry them
- lots of empty cabs driving around

Gas prices and the expense of operating a vehicle in the city takes care of the second. Taxi companies won't run cabs if they're not making money, so the problem is self-limiting. Medallions only serve to artificially limit supply.

Comment Re:Cool article... (Score 2) 135

One of the reasons Uber, Lyft and all the other "ride sharing" app companies get so much flack because they are breaking the law.

I'd be more sympathetic if 1) Uber and Lyft were offering the same services as taxis (you can't flag down an Uber; you have to request one), and 2) many jurisdictions hadn't already ruled that you're wrong.

Comment Re:Why don't taxis just provide good service?! (Score 3, Interesting) 135

In most jurisdictions the taxi companies have been subject to more rigorous (i.e. expensive) standards than Uber has been following.

...because they paid good money to write those laws. Taxi laws are a prime example of regulatory capture. For example, Company A got a sweet deal on credit card readers and they spent 2 years installing them in their cabs. Then, they tell the local regulatory body that credit card readers are a necessary public good and suggest that all taxis should have readers installed in a reasonable time frame - say, within three months. Finally, they laugh as their competitors scramble to shell out inflated prices for emergency rush orders on credit card readers so that they can stay in business.

For another example, three companies get together for group bargaining with an insurance company: "if you give us a good rate, we'll guarantee that all of our cabs will carry your new expanded coverage." Once that deal's in place, they ask for regulations to require all taxis to carry that level of coverage. Of course, all other companies have to pay the un-negotiated rate and now they have a harder time competing.

You don't get to write the laws and then bitch about them. Well, apparently you can, but you shouldn't be able to.

Comment Re:Move to the latest version? (Score 1) 435

It is gonna cost probably a couple hundred million in routers and modems that cannot support IPV6

...if you attempted to replace them all at once today. No one does that. Instead, IPv6 support will become a bullet point for purchasing replacements for EOL hardware and we'll transition to it naturally as IPv4-only hardware falls by the wayside.

Comment Re:Boy cries wolf (Score 1) 435

The story never mentions that there are actually other pools that still contain a goldmine of addresses.

Such as...

I also suspect that companies own big blocks that can be freed when the going gets tough.

An entire /8 would push back the inevitable by, what, a few weeks? And who's going to gladly give up a class A? No, for all practical purposes the article is completely correct. We're out. There might be some tricks that could let IPv4 allocation limp along for another few months, but that's not going to help anything.

Mirrors should reflect a little before throwing back images. -- Jean Cocteau