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Comment: Re:Car analogy (Score 1) 437

by grahammm (#48729283) Attached to: Netflix Cracks Down On VPN and Proxy "Pirates"

But there is a difference between "Not supported" and "Actively preventing it from working". If a country is 'not supported' then it should mean that you are on your own and the official support channels will not provide help if you have problems. Not that they actively block you from accessing from that country,

Comment: Re:Cat and mouse... (Score 1) 437

by grahammm (#48729135) Attached to: Netflix Cracks Down On VPN and Proxy "Pirates"

It's all about the cash. Different markets have different rates because they can/can't afford a single worldwide rate..

True. But that does not stop them providing the same shows/movies etc worldwide but charging the appropriate local rate for access. I wonder how much of this "pirating" is to get cheaper access to content which is available locally, and how much to get access to content which is NOT available locally and therefore can only be obtained by 'pirating'? I suspect that the latter is more common than the former.

Comment: Re:This is nothing new for me. (Score 1) 164

One slight problem with that. When it has been passed to the payment processor it is too late. In many (if not all) EU countries, the law requires that the tax inclusive price is shown to the buyer when the buyer is a consumer (ie not a business to business transaction). So the appropriate VAT rate has to be known before the buyer is shown the selection of goods/services on offer.

Comment: Following != agreeing (Score 4, Insightful) 121

Just because you follow something on Twitter or Facebook does not mean you agree with or support it. Surely it makes sense to also follow the enemy/opposition/competition just to get more of an insight into what they are doing. So, it would make sense for Obama and/or his staff to follow the Tea Party.

Comment: Re:Airlines could surcharge for the actual journey (Score 1) 349

by grahammm (#48696243) Attached to: United and Orbitz Sue 22-Year-Old Programmer For Compiling Public Info

There have been at least 2 well publicised cases of this in the UK, but on the railway not airlines. In the first, someone had a very cheap point-to-point fare and when they got off the train one stop to early they were charged as though they had no ticket. The second involved someone with an advance (ie allocated seat, specific train etc) ticket who got a lift to the stop after the origin shown on the ticket and again they had to pay full fare for the journey actually made.

Comment: Airlines could surcharge for the actual journey (Score 1) 349

by grahammm (#48695381) Attached to: United and Orbitz Sue 22-Year-Old Programmer For Compiling Public Info

One way round this issue, from the airlines point of view would be for them to charge the passenger for the actual flight taken - NY to SF in the case outlined - if both that flight would have been more expensive than the one booked and the passenger does not use the extra leg(s). I suspect most flights are booked with credit cards, so the airlines could do the same as hotels are just make an extra charge if the final legs are not used.

Comment: Hotspot handover? (Score 1) 63

by grahammm (#48307669) Attached to: Study: There's a Wi-Fi Hotspot For Every 150 People In the World

As the article states, currently you have to log in to each hotspot individually. Are there ant plans to implement the protocol which enables you to migrate between hotspots in the same way as you move between cell towers, with each hotspot handing over your connection to the next? This could be useful for pedestrians in city centres, shopping areas etc and would relieve the load on the 3G networks in areas where lots of people are using data connections on their mobile phones. So that as you move between shops you do not have to keep logging in to a different hotspot.

Comment: Re:I'm surrounded by morons (Score 1) 613

by grahammm (#48293663) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Where Do You Stand on Daylight Saving Time?

By the time DST starts, it is already light past the time for getting home for work, and when DST ends it is starting to get dark at go-home time. During the summer it would be light during both morning and evening commute, and in winter it would be dark irrespective of DST. It is only during the few weeks around the clock changes that it affects whether the commutes are in daylight or darkness. Also as others have pointed out, the clock changes are at the time of year when it is getting light/dark during the morning/evening commute which leads to having to two periods each years of suffering the sun just over the horizon during each commute.

Comment: Re:I'm surrounded by morons (Score 1) 613

by grahammm (#48291617) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Where Do You Stand on Daylight Saving Time?

No. Most of (Western) Europe should be on GMT/UTC. The timezone system is based on the sun being at its highest point within 30 minutes of noon local time, with it being at exactly noon at the 15N degree longitude lines. So it is continental Europe that should change to the 'natural' timezone rather than the UK changing to CET.

Comment: Re:WTFBBQ (Score 1) 217

So just have 2 sets of doors and arrange so that they cannot both be open simultaneously - ie an airlock type system. The first set of doors is open and the second closed. People pass through the 1st door, the door closes and the 2nd door opens to allow the people to exit. The second door will not close (and the first remains closed) while there is anyone in the area between the doors. This means that if someone does try to go the wrong way, they will have to turn back and exit through the door they entered by.

AI

The Challenges and Threats of Automated Lip Reading 120

Posted by Soulskill
from the surgical-masks-become-high-fashion-in-2018 dept.
An anonymous reader writes: Speech recognition has gotten pretty good over the past several years. it's reliable enough to be ubiquitous in our mobile devices. But now we have an interesting, related dilemma: should we develop algorithms that can lip read? It's a more challenging problem, to be sure. Sounds can be translated directly into words, but deriving meaning out of the movement of a person's face is much more complex. "During speech, the mouth forms between 10 and 14 different shapes, known as visemes. By contrast, speech contains around 50 individual sounds known as phonemes. So a single viseme can represent several different phonemes. And therein lies the problem. A sequence of visemes cannot usually be associated with a unique word or sequence of words. Instead, a sequence of visemes can have several different solutions." Beyond the computational aspect, we also need to decide, as a society, if this is a technology that should exist. The privacy implications extend beyond that of simple voice recognition.

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