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Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 1) 366

by sjames (#46801853) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

Wrongo yourself. For one, that's corn, not barley. For two, it caused no human (or animal) illness. Also, pigs are not cattle. Oh, and it's in a different part of the country. Given the nature of the problem, it's probably the richness of the feed such that drying won't help. But other than everything, it's dead on :-)

Comment: Re:CCHR has made some valid points... (Score 2) 109

by sjames (#46800621) Attached to: Google Aids Scientology-Linked Group CCHR With Pay-Per-Click Ads

I would say the field of psychiatry is long overdue for an overhaul. It has a great deal of baggage that it refuses to put down. It's unfortunate that Scieentology has gotten involved. They do have a few good points here, but bring a lot of baggage of their own and then muddy the water by WAY overreaching and injecting the crazy Xenu stuff into the discussion.

Comment: Re:I would think (Score 1) 283

by sjames (#46800233) Attached to: OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

- If a change is only "house cleaning" which is unrelated to security, why do it in such a rush?

Sometimes the cruft is so deep you can't read the code properly anymore. It has to go so you can see where things stand. Sometimes it's actually papering over bugs. You have to take the paper down to see papered over bugs clearly. One reason for a lot of commits is when you keep the individual changes small and documented. It's better in cases like this to have 100 commits of small changes with individual commit messages rather than having one big one at the end of the week marked "A whole heap of stuff".

Comment: Re:I would think (Score 1) 283

by sjames (#46800207) Attached to: OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

This is being done in a fork of the code. Step one is to chainsaw out the pile of deadwood and obvious errors as well as a particularly nasty 'feature' that made heartbleed more than a curiosity (that would be the replacement malloc/free).

Looking at the commits, in some cases they're zeroing pointers after free to make it fail hard on use after free bugs rather than usually getting away with it.

+ - One week of OpenSSL cleanup ->

Submitted by CrAlt
CrAlt (3208) writes "After the news of heartbleed broke early last week, the OpenBSD team dove in and started axing it up into shape. Leading this effort are Ted Unangst (tedu@) and Miod Vallat (miod@), who are head-to-head on a pure commit count basis with both having around 50 commits in this part of the tree in the week since Ted's first commit in this area. They are followed closely by Joel Sing (jsing@) who is systematically going through every nook and cranny and applying some basic KNF. Next in line are Theo de Raadt (deraadt@) and Bob Beck (beck@) who've been both doing a lot of cleanup, ripping out weird layers of abstraction for standard system or library calls.

Then Jonathan Grey (jsg@) and Reyk Flöter (reyk@) come next, followed by a group of late starters. Also, an honorable mention for Christian Weisgerber (naddy@), who has been fixing issues in ports related to this work.

All combined, there've been over 250 commits cleaning up OpenSSL. In one week. Some of these are simple or small changes, while other commits carry more weight. Of course, occasionally mistakes get made but these are also quickly fixed again, but the general direction is clear: move the tree forward towards a better, more readable, less buggy crypto library.

Check them out at http://anoncvs.estpak.ee/cgi-b..."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 1) 366

by sjames (#46798247) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

So if all those horrible practices have been in play for so long, where's the zombie cow plague? Really, where is it?

I did n't form my opinion from some industry spokeman. I formed it based on my knowledge of BSE and e-coli. For instance, knowing BSE cannot be transmitted in grain. For knowing that e-coli dies under the conditions wort is made under (if it didn't it would spoil the beer, so you bet the brewers are sticklers for that). Even from the knowledge that slaughter houses and animal feed companies may own trucks exposed to bovine neural tissue, rancher's trucks are not. so let the problem rest on the shoulders of those who might actually have that problem.

From your rantings, I have a fair certainty you have NO IDEA WHTSOEVER what the risks are either way. For instance, your apparent belief that grain could transmit a prion disease unless dried. Based on the rest of your post veering into terrorism and CIA torture, I'm going to guess you are at least one toke over the line this evening.

Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 1) 366

by sjames (#46798049) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

That's just the problem. For things that are clearly under their purview, they are lax and even passive (as long as those they regulate at least pay them lip service and get the forms filled in on time). They only seem to have the energy and money for things that expand their domain. Beyond that, they don't really seem all that concerned about the outcome.

Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 2) 366

by sjames (#46798011) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

I am in favor of sensible regulation. This one isn't sensible, so I oppose it.

It's amazing though. Express any support for any sort of law or regulation, even the law against murder and suddenly some think you want to decide how many times they can inhale in an hour. I have no idea why.

Comment: Re:So - who's in love with the government again? (Score 1) 366

by sjames (#46798001) Attached to: Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

But if you don't have a proper procedure in place, there's nothing stop a container that *did* contain beef byproducts to be reused to carry the grain waste as cow feed.

Too bad the regulation is all about processing the grain before it gets picked up and says nothing about how it's handled once it is picked up. I'm pretty sure no brewer is using beef byproducts in their wort. So let the regulation read that the grain may not come into contact with a container that hauled beef byproducts. BAM, done, because nobody does that anyway. No need to spend millions.

I suppose there's the risk they might unwisely decide to pack it into a cannon and shoot it in the general direction of their ranch too (even though nobody's tried that yet), shall we consult BATF? And the state department, you never know, they might find a way to violate the nuclear arms treaties.

In other words, I'm complaining about this because it has never been a problem AND there is no plausible mechanism where it becomes a problem.

On the other hand, I very much agree that mold should not be growing on 'sterile' equipment meant to package medicine to be injected into the spine. I have a hard time imagining that not to be a problem. The mechanism where it causes a problem is obvious (lo and behold, it is a problem). It's been a regulation for quite a while, they're just too busy dreaming of how to expand their domain to actually enforce the regulations that actually make sense.

Your fault -- core dumped

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