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Comment Justice (Score 0, Troll) 448

Whenever someone has unpopular political views we should try and get them fired from any job they get. And the same goes for their families. Hell, we should probably just steal their belongings and toss them in the streets. At a minimum, the businesses in our society should be balkanized by political beliefs, trading with and hiring only those who agree with their politics.

Submission + - Middle Eastern Virus More Widespread Than Thought ( 1

sciencehabit writes: It's called Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, after the region where almost all the patients have been reported. But the name may turn out to be a misnomer. A new study has found the virus in camels from Sudan and Ethiopia, suggesting that Africa, too, harbors the pathogen. That means MERS may sicken more humans than previously thought—and perhaps be more likely to trigger a pandemic.

Submission + - Whole Foods: America's Temple of Pseudoscience (

__roo writes: Americans get riled up about creationists and climate change deniers, but lap up the quasi-religious snake oil at Whole Foods. It’s all pseudoscience—so why are some kinds of pseudoscience more equal than others? That's the question the author of this article tackles: "From the probiotics aisle to the vaguely ridiculous Organic Integrity outreach effort ... Whole Foods has all the ingredients necessary to give Richard Dawkins nightmares." He points out his local Whole Foods' "predominantly liberal clientele that skews academic" shop at a place where a significant portion of the product being sold is based on simple pseudoscience. So, why do many of us perceive Whole Foods and the Creation Museum so differently?

Comment Re:Traceability (Score 1) 655

Several counties (including Orange) and cities (including Orlando) in Florida have passed laws making it illegal for recyclers to pay cash to customers for "frequently stolen" materials like copper wire and require a check be mailed to the customers for these items. Law enforcement claimed this would make it easier to identify thieves. State law already required recyclers to collect the name, age, dob, address, phone number, height, weight, identifying marks, hair color, eye color, vehicle make, model, and tag, plus a copy of the customers driver's license, a picture of the customer, and a picture of the material being sold. If all that wasn't enough for the cops to catch the thieves, the fact the check was mailed to them is not going to make any difference. But it does add more hassle and overhead to running the business: check fraud is skyrocketing for the scrap metal recyclers.

Make it right before you make it faster.