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Comment: Re:What about a re-implementation... (Score 1) 292

by goose-incarnated (#46766639) Attached to: OpenBSD Team Cleaning Up OpenSSL

While I broadly agree with your argument, I have to point out that the heartbleed exploit was due to the OpenSSL devs forgoing the system's malloc implementation and rolling their own abstraction for performance reasons.

No. No it wasn't. The Heartbleed exploit was a classic buffer overread bug that would have been prevented by any language with bounds checking.

[Any language with bounds-checking protection] that would likely have been bypassed by the dev-team due to performance reasons. Seriously, for performance reasons this dev-team bypassed malloc of all things; do you really want to assert that they wouldn't have bypassed a bounds-checker?

In my previous post I thought I made this bit clear; it was not that there was protection on some platforms, it was that they bypassed all platform allocators in favour of their own. That's the bug right there. Everything else, like overruns, overreading, etc is a result of that decision. I cannot believe that, with a different language, they would have made a different decision

Comment: Re:What about a re-implementation... (Score 1) 292

by goose-incarnated (#46765033) Attached to: OpenBSD Team Cleaning Up OpenSSL

...Let's divide up problems into "memory errors" and "logic errors", where we broadly interpret "memory errors" as "errors your language or runtime won't let you make."

...

Furthermore, because in C you have to spend time and effort making sure you're not susceptable to memory errors, that takes time and effort away from looking for other errors...

While I broadly agree with your argument, I have to point out that the heartbleed exploit was due to the OpenSSL devs forgoing the system's malloc implementation and rolling their own abstraction for performance reasons. In effect they bypassed the system's protection, so arguing that removing the need for manual memory management would make code safer (it would) is irrelevant to the heartbleed exploit.

In this instance, had they been using Java or similar, it is likely that they would have still rolled their own for performance reasons, thereby still bypassing the languages protections.

Comment: Re:I'm disapointed in people (Score 1) 689

by goose-incarnated (#46745371) Attached to: The GNOME Foundation Is Running Out of Money

Thanks for this. It's great to see a positive comment in a sea of disingenious comments.

I wish I could've modded you down instead. What you mean is "It's great to see a positive opinion in a sea of negative opinions". I have no doubt that it feels great, but should you not be wondering why there is a single positive opinion on Gnome3 for every 25 negative opinions? Does that ratio not tell you that Gnome fucked up?

Comment: Re:Seems pretty different, not a gesture (Score 1) 408

by goose-incarnated (#46691523) Attached to: Apple: Dumb As a Patent Trolling Fox On iPhone Prior Art?

She also said in the tests that it was one of the least preferred ways to use a switch, and that they made changes based on feedback like making it more obvious you were grabbing a physical handle on the sliding switch (the highlighting of the handle).

In Samsung's documents, the sliding to unlock came out as by far the most preferred of a number of different mechanisms, which is an indicator that the two things are different even if they appear the same on the surface.

Sorry, but no. Just because two people say different things about the same process (one says most preferred and the other says least preferred) doesn't mean that it *might* be different things they are talking about. In fact, it almost never does. In this particular case it's clear even to brain-damaged fanbois that this is prior art.

Comment: Re:Not as good a field of view (Score 1) 496

by goose-incarnated (#46647197) Attached to: Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Ever hear of this invention called a zoom lens? You'll be able to adjust you field of view....

Shazzam!

That works on mirrors too. So does wide-angle lenses. The camera brings no advantages other than fancy software for identifying imminent threats, and if a driver really really needs that then he's going to get himself into trouble sooner or alter anyway.

Comment: Re:Somewhat cheaper... (Score 1) 496

by goose-incarnated (#46647183) Attached to: Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

I had to replace a side view mirror about 6 months ago. $150.

Cool story. I replaced the RHS sideview mirror of my wife's ford escort last week for ~$10. Of course, it was a simple as going to the local glasscutter and getting him to make a replacement piece of reflective glass. Didn't even try at the dealer for a replacement.

(OTOH, the dealer wanted ~$210 for the thermostat housing. Non-dealer replacements are almost always an order of magnitude cheaper, so that "cheap camera" that replaces the mirror won't be)

Comment: Re:simplicity and reliability (Score 1) 496

by goose-incarnated (#46647173) Attached to: Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

and in those situations a camera or multiple cameras is far superior to a fucking piece of glass with silver.

There is nothing that a camera can show you that cannot be done with curved mirrors.

(if it breaks, take it for fixing, like you would if someone kicked off your real mirror - and unlike popular myth you don't have to drive like an asshole even if everyone else is driving like one so you can take your time to get to the shop..).

I like my view from the drivers seat to be unimpeded even if the car is not fully functional. Actually, visibility is even more important when the car is less than 100% functional. I don't want a blown fuse, or a wiring problem, or other electrical malfunction to limit my visibility.

Comment: Re:Reply to Comment - Beta, why no default subject (Score 1) 263

Patrick Byrne indicates that they keep a small percentage of profits in Bitcoin and are looking to increase that percentage when they start getting more of their partners accepting Bitcoin.

I think you meant "any of their partners". Right now (mostly due to accounting laws) a business is going to have a hard time accepting anything other than currency (any currency) for payment, hence I'd like to see how they intend to "keep some of the profits in bitcoins" other than converting dollars back to bitcoins. Both overstock.com and tigerdirect make it clear that they use an exchange so that they can receive real currency. Were they to actually receive bitcoins in payment you can be sure that more than a few tax officials would start wondering about it.

Technically BTC that is received would have to go on the books as stock or similar. Thus keeping "revenue" in BTC means capturing payment in books at time of receipt, in which case the value you have captured is non-financial instrument asset. This asset has to be depreciated. Selling that BTC later on (for dollars) results in even further revenue. This just artificially drives up the "earned revenue" in the year-end balance, making it an almost certainty that you would be paying vastly more in tax than you would otherwise have done.

Every time the topic comes up, all the BTC proponents, with not a single accounting or economics degree between them (Patrick Byrne has the "do you want fries with that" Philosophy degree) start disagreeing with practicing accountants, book-keepers and economists. BTC as money starts looking even more of a joke when you actually try to keep books with it - book-keeping, and all the laws made in every country to audit it, don't work on a deflationary currency.

BTC can't work as a currency. It was designed as a poor joke on otherwise smart people who are a little clueless about accounting, economics, book-keeping, etc.

Comment: Re:Reply to Comment - Beta, why no default subject (Score 1) 263

Why is this lie perpetually getting repeated? Hell, some moron even modded it up. Overstock (and Tigerdirect, etc) do not accept bitcoins as payment. You might want to tell that to Overstock and Tiger Direct, then, who both proudly proclaim that they do accept BTC as payment.

They can proclaim whatever the hell they want to; they themselves state, on their website in multiple places, that bitcoin transactions are routed through coinbase or similar.

But no doubt, you know better than they do, so carry on with the Bitcoin hate.

When we go to the zoo and comment on the monkeys flinging poo at each other we don't call it "hate". We call it "scorn".

Comment: Re:Reply to Comment - Beta, why no default subject (Score 3, Insightful) 263

Though, with the likes of Overstock accepting BTC now, the marketplace itself might soon serve that function without needing an external point of reference.

Why is this lie perpetually getting repeated? Hell, some moron even modded it up. Overstock (and Tigerdirect, etc) do not accept bitcoins as payment.

Once again for those of you too stupid to read carefully - No major retailer accepts bitcoins as tender!. Some of them allow you to pay via an exchange such as coinbase, but note that even though the customer is parting with bitcoins, the seller is only ever receiving dollars (AKA real currency).

Comment: Re:But He Isn't (Score 1, Insightful) 276

What, seriously? I said: Newsweek. It's the very first link in the summary, you can't find that? Fine, for your lazy ass: link.

Hate to burst your bubble, but that link has no evidence whatsoever, only a lot of conjecture and speculation. As of now, there is still no evidence that this man and the bitcoin inventor are the same person.

Machines certainly can solve problems, store information, correlate, and play games -- but not with pleasure. -- Leo Rosten

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