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Comment: Re:Cannot someone else do the updates ? (Score 4, Informative) 405 405

Joda already provides their own TZ update mechanism: http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/tz_update.html

Also anyone NOT using Joda for dates/times in Java really needs to come to the light and experience the wonders of a well designed API.

Comment: Re:Can't write concurrent code? (Score 1) 509 509

Really? Honestly curious what language you're working in. I do a ton of concurrent dev in Java and it is quite easy to write unit tests for. I think almost all of my concurrent code also abstracts most of the problems into a nice class hierarchy that encapsulates most of the threading related code anyways.

I'm not saying there aren't pit-falls but with something like http://www.amazon.com/Java-Concurrency-Practice-Brian-Goetz/dp/0321349601 as a reference it is really not that hard to right solid, unit testable, modular, multi-threaded code in Java. Though it really does help that as of JDK5 there are a lot of really nice concurrent constructs just built into the core API.

Comment: Re:What, Pray Tell (Score 2) 408 408

Uh, because they know that ads cannot be the income source forever? They need to find the next big thing and be there first or someone else will eventually beat them at their own game and then they'll go poof.

Yet another problem with being driven by quarterly profits instead of long term viability.

Comment: Re:Java: Was write once run everywhere ever the ca (Score 4, Informative) 157 157

All depends on what you're doing with it. I work on an enterprise level webapp written 100% in java and we have deployments on Windows, Linux, Solaris and OSX-Server using the EXACT same code base and this is an app with over 1000 classes and 250k+ lines of code.

Comment: Re:Bogus premise (Score 3, Insightful) 591 591

Your premise is equally as bogus. You're assuming that all our enemies could be made to fear us. If your living conditions suck enough it becomes hard to fear anything. What do you have to be afraid of? You likely have nothing of material value and little to no family to be held over you. Death / torture is the only thing they could be afraid of and so what? They are likely in a position where death is always a possibility anyways. How do you make someone with little or nothing to lose fear you?

Comment: Re:Look at the list from John Hopkins University (Score 3, Informative) 177 177

As for the Michigan Technological University program here is more info: http://youthprograms.mtu.edu/

I went there in early high school for some of the CS camps and came away with a lot of interest and a great head start for college.

Comment: Re:My daughter did a great course last year.. (Score 1) 177 177

I was just going to point about Michigan Tech's Summar Youth Program: http://youthprograms.mtu.edu/

It is a very well run educational summer camp at one of the better small engineering and sciences schools in the country. I did a summer of intro to CS classes while in high school and got a huge jump start for my college career. Also it is a lot of fun and a beautiful place to visit.

Comment: Write them down and lock them up (Score 1) 402 402

My wife and I both have written down our most commonly used passwords including our OSX Keychain passwords. These go into an envelope which has our signatures over the seal and then placed in a lockbox. If someone happened one either/both of us the details on these passwords are in our wills.

Comment: Re:Learned Stupidity (Score 1) 192 192

I have one of the higher end honeywell models (like $200 for the control panel + remote logic box) that has all sorts of fun options. Maximum adjustment increment, overall max/min settings, etc.

The biggest features I got it for are the external temp sensor which the thermostat uses to adjust the humidifier run time to avoid condensation in the winter and the smart recovery. The thermostat uses a combination of outside + inside temps and some recent historical data (how fast did the house cool down or heat up) to get to a specified temp at the specified time. So if I set it for 55 at night and want it to be 67 at 7am the thing just figures out what time it needs to kick on the heat in the morning so that at 7am the house is at 67. Wonderful feature if you live in the Midwest and you'd have to reprogram a simpler thermostat every month to get the same behavior.

If the code and the comments disagree, then both are probably wrong. -- Norm Schryer

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