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Submission + - UK Media fall for crazy chilld locating claims (

Padraig writes: "Madeleine McCann is a young British girl who was abducted several months ago, and her story has produced mass media hysteria. They've hit an all time low today. Both the Observer and the Mirror, huge UK newspapers, are reporting that an ex policeman called Danie Krugel has found DNA traces of her on a beach. What they don't tell you is that in fact, Krugel has a magic box which works on a "secret energy source" using "quantum physics" to pinpoint the location of a missing person anywhere in the world on a map simply by using a sample of their DNA. This has got to be the most inaccurate story of the year. Playing on people's hopes like that is just wrong."
Desktops (Apple)

Submission + - 30th Anniversary of Apple II going on sale (

WhatAboutTheAltair writes: June 5th 1977 (exactly 30 years ago today) was an important date in the history of computing: the Apple II, the world's first practical personal computer went on sale. $1,298 (equivalent to about $4,000 in 2007 terms) got you a MOS Technology 6502 microprocessor blitzing away at 1MHz, 4KB of RAM, Interger BASIC on ROM, an audio cassette interface for storing programs & data, and a 24x40 caps-only video output which you could connect to your TV with an RF modulator. For $2,638 you could get your hands on the top-end machine equipped with a massive 48KB of RAM — and you thought the price of RAM upgrades at the Apple Store was expensive today!

Submission + - Vulgar language, if Pres. can do it so can you

An anonymous reader writes: The Second Circuit Court of Appeals issued a fascinating decision today in a case pitting the television networks against the government over indecency rules involving expletives. Our colleague Stephen Labaton captures it this way in his lead paragraphs: If President Bush and Vice President Cheney can use vulgar language, then the government cannot punish others for doing the same thing on television. That, in essence, was the decision on Monday, when a federal appeals court struck down the government policy of fining stations and networks that broadcast shows containing profanities. Both network executives and top officials at the commission said that if the opinion is not reversed on appeal, it would gut the commission's ability to regulate any speech on television or radio. Kevin J. Martin, the chairman of the commission, said the agency was now considering whether to seek an appeal before all the members of the appeals court or to take the matter directly to the Supreme Court. The decision, by a divided panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York, was a sharp rebuke for the Federal Communications Commission and for the Bush administration. For the four television networks that filed the lawsuit, Fox, CBS, NBC and ABC, it was a major victory in a legal and cultural battle being waged between them and the commission and its supporters.

Submission + - Google Images Undisclosed Face Recognition Feature

alberion writes: The Google image search has an undisclosed face recognition feature. Just add "&imgtype=face" to the url of an image search result to check it out. Can we expect individual face recognition in the future? How will this affect people's privacy?

Submission + - Microsoft demands developer withdraw free software

An anonymous reader writes: ZDNet reports : "Microsoft has demanded that a London-based Windows developer withdraws a version of his free debugging tool from distribution, and is claiming that the tool breaches its licensing conditions."

Submission + - LiveJournal Giving Russian Sites Your Username (

An anonymous reader writes: As if LiveJournal didn't have enough problems, a member of the no_lj_ads community discovered that whenever you visit the Russian sites or (confusingly, not actually owned by Livejournal), it automatically hands them your currently logged-in username. Unlike normal OpenID, you don't get asked for permission first, or even told that this has happened. Better still, has a JavaScript injection hole that allows any other site to discover your LiveJournal username too, without your knowledge.

The official solution? Log off from LiveJournal before visiting the sites. It may also be possible to get the same result by deliberately breaking OpenID on your journal, but it remains to be seen how long this loophole will last for.


Submission + - Famatech: Yet Another abusive Terms of Upgrade

An anonymous reader writes: Radmin 3.0, the world famous vaporware was finally released a few weeks ago. However, in order to get the first of a lifetime of free upgrades that were part of the deal (if you bought it around 2000) you must first give up your right to free upgrades. Check the agreement Here . Apparently this is becoming common, and companies realize that getting money by promising what they couldn't deliver wasn't such as good idea. Considering that they don't keep the end of the bargain, do the ripped-off users have an obligation to keep ours?

Submission + - Congress Wants ISPs to Log Your Online Life

walmartshopper67 writes: "Crooks and Liars is reporting that Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX) has introduced a bill that would require ISPs to "record all users' surfing activity, IM conversations and email traffic indefinitely". The bill would impose heavy fines and jail time on ISPs that do not save the required information. Not that this will pass, but come on, how can anyone think this is a good idea?"

Submission + - Congressman calls for email and IM monitoring

An anonymous reader writes: covers a story on a bill introduced to the US House of Representatives that would require ISPs to record all users' surfing activity, IM conversations and email traffic indefinitely. has the same story.

Be careful when a loop exits to the same place from side and bottom.