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Comment: Re:Sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen (Score 1) 448

by gnapster (#46103033) Attached to: Developer Loses Single-Letter Twitter Handle Through Extortion
The reason is to verify that the number stamped into the plastic is the same as the number encoded on the magstripe. It's really easy to overwrite magstripe data. I have been asked to confirm the last four at grocery stores; they usually ask for the card, but if you recite the last four, it's usually satisfactory.

Comment: Re: (Score 1) 448

by gnapster (#46102653) Attached to: Developer Loses Single-Letter Twitter Handle Through Extortion
If I can update the IP range, what is to prevent the attacker from doing the same? It's not like my ISP tells me when their servers are going to change my address. I understand, in general, how whitelisting works, but I don't know how it is handled by the registrars who provide this service.
News

Soylent: No Food For 30 Days 440

Posted by Soulskill
from the do-twinkies-count? dept.
Daniel_Stuckey writes "Senior Editor of Motherboard Brian Merchant went an entire month without eating regular food. Instead, the journalist whisked up a concoction called soylent, an efficient take on the future of nourishment and nutrition. Merchant says: 'It was my second day on Soylent and my stomach felt like a coil of knotty old rope, slowly tightening. I wasn't hungry, but something was off. I was tired, light-headed, low-energy, but my heart was racing. My eyes glazed over as I stared out the window of our rental SUV as we drove over the fog-shrouded Bay Bridge to Oakland. Some of this was nerves, sure. I had twenty-eight days left of my month-long all-Soylent diet—I was attempting to live on the full food replacement longer than anyone besides its inventor—and I felt woozy already. ... By the third week of Soylent, not eating food seemed normal. I saw a doctor, who said I was healthy; I was still losing weight, but nothing serious. Yet, given that a daily mixture of Soylent contains 2,400 calories, both Rob and Dr. Engel thought it was odd that I’d shed so much. Dr. Engel said that given my weight, height, and body mass, I should only require about 1,800 calories a day. I could still be adjusting to the new diet, or I could have such a hyperactive metabolism that before Soylent, I was tearing through hundreds of extra calories per day and staying trim.'"

Comment: Re:Thank you to the submitter (Score 1) 223

by gnapster (#45261711) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Cross-Platform (Linux-Only) Audio Software?

I'm not familiar with EAC, but I did catch the bit about moving away from XP. That is why I mentioned wine. Wine supports some software better than others, and EAC seems to work well. (Now that I look in their database, it appears that Polderbits is not listed, so all bets are off.) Are you acquainted with Wine?

Based on your description, it seems like Polderbits would suit your needs better than EAC since it is designed for the purpose of archiving analog audio, while EAC seems geared towards digital audio. It may be that neither one can be made to work well under Linux, but it sounded like you were interested in possibilities, so I shared the one that came to mind. YMMV.

Comment: Re:Thank you to the submitter (Score 1) 223

by gnapster (#45255055) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Cross-Platform (Linux-Only) Audio Software?
If 'better than Audacity' means (for you) good at recording albums and splitting tracks, then you might want to check out Polderbits. I used it for the purpose of digitizing cassette tapes many years ago, and I'm sure it has only gotten better. In terms of general features it is very limited compared to Audacity, but it is good at automatically detecting sensible places to split tracks. It is only released for Windows, but it may run in Wine.

Comment: Re:How do you compare for phones? (Score 1) 558

by gnapster (#45196301) Attached to: Why Does Windows Have Terrible Battery Life?

Well, sure. I was responding to the 'no dual-booting phones' portion of your comment, but it is true that no amount of Linux will help us compare Windows to iOS. (Well, perhaps that is not true. One day we may be able to install roughly the same Ubuntu on a Nokia Lumia as well as an iPhone. That might give us some kind of transitive benchmarks.)

Comment: Re:How do you compare for phones? (Score 2) 558

by gnapster (#45193467) Attached to: Why Does Windows Have Terrible Battery Life?

The Nexus 4 can allegedly run both Android and Ubuntu: http://www.ubuntu.com/phone. I have not tried it, and I don't think there's a dual-booting bootloader yet, but it sounds interesting.

I know they both use the same kernel (more or less), but the software ecosystem is probably quite different, including the power management.

Comment: Re:Markdown is gaining popularity again (Score 2) 204

by gnapster (#45185427) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Do You Use Markdown and Pandoc?

Have you ever used TeXmacs, and do you have an opinion of it? I suspect you have, since "what you see is what you mean" is a phrase of which they are quite fond.

For those who have not: TeXmacs is a graphical editor which implements the typesetting rules from TeX in an editor whose interface is inspired by emacs. (M-x commands, and all.) It does not use LaTeX as an intermediate rendering engine. I used it for a while. It has some virtue.

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