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Comment: Re:Not resigning from Debian (Score 1) 550

Did it actually not boot or did it seem to hang and the guy resets it after a minute? I ask because my PC had exactly this problem. Ages ago I had a drive die in my system so I pulled it but missed one of the references in /etc/fstab and when I did the initial conversion to systemd it hung and I was about to pull my hear out but instead I left the room to clear my head and came back several minutes later to find my system booted with no explanation as to why the delay.

The systemd update a few weeks ago finally gave me a nice message on console to let me know that one of my fstab entries was timing out so I checked, found the entry and now everything boots faster.

Comment: Re:Systemd is killing the Debian project. (Score 3, Informative) 550

And the criticism from those who are against systemd is extremely important to consider. The complaints are very sound, from a technological perspective. They're also based on decades of real world experience, which just cannot be ignored.

I'm not a total fan of every design feature of everything systemd has done but gave you actually read their supporting references? I'm most of the cases boycottsystemd has rephrased events to make the systemd folks look as bad as possible in ways that would make a Fox news reporter feel proud. A good example is their comment about requiring "bug for bug" compatibility with glibc was instead a use of a certain non posix flag needed for thread safety and complaining that it is tightly tied to Linux is about as helpful as complaining that udev is tightly tied to Linux.

At any rate, I find it very telling that they don't actually mention any of their supporters.

Comment: Re:Tempting (Score 1) 181

by gmack (#48366249) Attached to: Multi-Process Comes To Firefox Nightly, 64-bit Firefox For Windows 'Soon'

64bit... again, bragging points about how many bits you use, no functional difference to anyone. Its like when I gave the 32 bit version of Visual Studio to a colleague and he complained that he wanted the 64 bit version.... there is no 64 bit version because it isn't needed. Its just the typical knee-jerk reaction that 64 bits is somehow essential for everything, not just those programs that really do require it.

Not entirely true, x86 was famously register starved meaning you had to spend a lot of time swapping things into and out of the general purpose registers. When AMD designed the 64 bit extensions, they doubled the number of registers to 16 total, meaning software could spend less time moving things around and more time actually doing something useful.

Comment: Re:Gnome3, systemd etc. (Score 2) 450

by gmack (#48341417) Attached to: Joey Hess Resigns From Debian

If gimp pulls in systemd libs then a bug should be filed there. There is no technical requirement it needs to be that way according to the gnome folks.

During that "lengthly consultation process", nearly all of the for systemd was based on the advantages that systemd, as an init system, offer over competing init systems. In the months since Debian committed to systemd, Poettering has been increasingly vocal that he wants systemd to be more than an init system. That is why there is a renewed call for debate.

This is what I mean by reading things for yourself. I've been reading about his plans but you are mistaking the systemd init system with the overall collections of things he is working on. It's not as if the high speed DHCP daemon he has just written will end up in PID 1. His proposals so far is that there will be more optional daemons that either work better and at some point in the future I wouldn't be shocked if there were to be a debate over whether his addons should replace existing daemons but we aren't there yet.

 

Comment: Re:Gnome3, systemd etc. (Score 1) 450

by gmack (#48341233) Attached to: Joey Hess Resigns From Debian

You do not have to install gnome3 on Debian, I don't. As for systemd, I suggest looking through Debian's extensive documentation detailing why they chose systemd over the alternatives. At any rate the time to argue systemd was last year when Debian had a very lengthily consultation process. I also suggest looking up the systemd documentation for yourself considering the huge amount of FUD being spread about it and I find it telling that neither the Debian fork website nor the boycott systemd websites don't actually name any of their supporters.

Comment: Re:Thank you! (Score 1) 125

by gmack (#48290909) Attached to: OpenBSD 5.6 Released

1. OpenBSD supports laptops, specifically Thinkpads, better than any other operating system not called Windows. Suspend/resume works, instantly.

That's less of a good thing considering how nasty Lenovo is to work with. Not only did they continue locking their mini pcie port against "unauthorized" wifi cards, they have double downed on their customer hating behaviour by refusing to charge third party batteries. Since that was written, they seem to have moved the enforcement into the firmware.

Comment: Re:It freakin' works fine (Score 2) 928

by gmack (#48281099) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

This is news to me. My main PC (debian jessie) has four cifs mounts on startup and they all come up with no trouble. The only systemd issue I've had so far was a minute and a half hang on startup that I couldn't spot but that was fixed by the latest debian update making the startup process actually tell me what it was doing. Turns out I had a swap entry in /etc/fstab from an old drive I removed ages ago and systemd was giving it a full 90 seconds in case it was slow to initialize rather than not there.

Comment: Re:Questiona re a bit sexists (Score 2) 447

by gmack (#48129951) Attached to: Statisticians Uncover What Makes For a Stable Marriage

I'm more interested in the "churchgoing" thing. It flies in the face of studies that show atheists don't have very different odds of getting divorced, whereas conservative Christians have higher divorce rates. Maybe the actual atheists are buried in a larger population of people that are nominally religious but don't go to church. I can see how the latter might be an interesting subgroup of religious people. These are people that think something is important but don't do it anyway. Atheists might be a lot more like the unfiltered population of religious people in that they are neither more nor less likely to do things they regard as important.

You have hit the nail on the head. There is a massive group of self identifying Christians who never attend church and never read the bible for themselves but call themselves Christians because their parents (or some family in the past) were Christians and since they outnumber Christians take their faith seriously, it has produced a lot of statistical noise and now we see clumsy attempts like this to work around the problem.

When I left you, I was but the pupil. Now, I am the master. - Darth Vader

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