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+ - Subversion project migrates to Git->

Submitted by gitficionado
gitficionado (3600283) writes "The Apache Subversion project has begun migrating its source code from the ASF Subversion repo to git. Last week, the Subversion PMC (project management committee) voted to to migrate, and the migration has already begun.

Although there was strong opposition to the move from the older and more conservative SVN devs, and reportedly a lot of grumbling and ranting when the vote was tallied, a member of the PMC (who asked to remain anonymous) told the author that "this [migration] will finally let us get rid of the current broken design to a decentralized source control model [and we'll get] merge and rename done right after all this time.""

Link to Original Source

Comment: They're horrible! (Score 1) 843

by glasn0st (#28934281) Attached to: 20 Years of MS Word and Why It Should Die a Swift Death
These PDF tax returns might look cool, but can cause a lot of headache.

The Dutch tax service experimented with them, a few years back. I could only do my personal income returns through one of these dynamic PDFs. The results:

1. All the different "pages" in the PDF were no actual pages, you had to navigate them using on-page scripted buttons and the PDF would dynamically overwrite a "page" into the content. Result: you couldn't PRINT the document! You would only get the first page! To workaround this, you could use a report generating button built into it, but its output did not match the screen layouts and it required data validation, so you couldn't easily copy inputs or send half-filled-in stuff to the accountant for review.

2. The PDF document seemed to append anything you did to itself. If you worked with it for a long time, it grew and grew. Even if you only corrected previous input it would grow in size. At some point Adobe Reader would take minutes on open or handle a keypress. I had to start over with my tax returns once, which was a pain because of (1).

3. When a new version of Adobe Reader came out, ALL THE OLD PDF'S WERE UNOPENABLE! Apparently, some scripting inside the document could not run anymore. All that was left was the static front page of the document. Very nice if you want to fill in a new return with your old stuff as a template. I wouldn't have cared to open this garbage if I could have printed it, but nooooo!

This stuff was the worst of the worst. And all while solving a non-problem. Arguably some of these issues were caused by a bad implementation, but some of them (the new Adobe not opening them) are fundamental. I never want to touch any scripted PDF again. Fortunately our tax service abandoned them next year. I cried tears of joy.
The Internet

Australian Censorship Bypassed Before Live Trials 184

Posted by timothy
from the you-expect-free-choice-from-the-government? dept.
newt writes "The Australian Government is planning to conduct live trials of as-yet-unspecified censorship technology. But as every geek already knows, these systems can't possibly work in the presence of VPNs and proxy servers. PC Authority clues the punters in." Maybe the ISPs secretly like encouraging SSH tunneling — and making everyone pay for the extra bandwidth used. Not really; Australia's major ISPs, as mentioned a few days ago, think it's a bad idea.
Biotech

Frozen Mice Cloned 272

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the science-fiction-will-be-real-in-our-lifetime dept.
m0rphin3 writes "Japanese scientists have cloned mice whose bodies were frozen for as long as 16 years and said on Monday it may be possible to use the technique to resurrect mammoths and other extinct species. Could we finally see Jurassic Park become a reality, or perhaps use this for colonizing other galaxies?"
Sun Microsystems

+ - Sun Releasing 8-Core Niagara 2 Processor

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Sun Microsystems is set to announce its eight-core Niagara 2 processor next week. Each core supports eight threads, so the chip handles 64 simultaneous threads, making it the centerpiece of Sun's "Throughput Computing" effort. Along with having more cores than the quads from Intel and AMD, the Niagara 2 have dual, on-chip 10G Ethernet ports with crytopgraphic capability. Sun doesn't get much processor press, because the chips are used only in its own CoolThreads servers, but Niagara 2 will probably be the fastest processor out there when its released, other than perhaps the also little-known 4-GHz IBM Power 6."
Security

Research Indicates Beijing Is World Virus Capital 119

Posted by Zonk
from the they-totally-win dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Chinese capital city of Beijing is now a global leader in distributing viruses. According to UK-based managed security services company Network Box, Beijing accounts for 40 percent of all viruses that passed though the company's servers in June, and 5.25 percent of detected spam. This compares with slightly lower percentages for cities in countries noted for having a malware problem. Moscow was second for spam with 5.12 percent, Seoul third with 3.58 percent, Turk in Turkey fourth with 3.4 percent, and London in fifth place at 2.47 percent. 'As more and more users come online in China, there's a good chance those computers are using pirated software without up-to-date security fixes, making them prime targets for hackers who are actually located elsewhere in the world, [Simon] Heron said. Those compromised computers, which are used to send spam and make it more difficult to identify the spammer, are so valuable that hacker gangs have been competing to take over machines. If one gang finds a machine running another gang's Trojan horse program — one that appears harmless to the victim but can be used to control a machine — they'll try to remove the software.'"
Windows

MS Trying To Spur Vista Sales With Discounts 329

Posted by kdawson
from the wee-mite-desperate dept.
Ang writes "Is Microsoft having worries about selling Vista already? Ars reports that Microsoft has announced yet another 'discount program' for Vista, but these new discounts work out to only about 10% off list price — not much when you notice that retailers already sell Vista below list. To make matters worse, the discount program would still end up costing you $100 more than the older 'family' discount built around Vista Ultimate in some situations. Ars spends seven paragraphs explaining this convoluted offer. Is all of this complexity supposed to help sell Vista?" If you must buy Vista, it might be advisable to sit on your wallet for a while. The discounts are bound to get sweeter.
The Courts

British Police Identify Killer in Radiation Case 235

Posted by Zonk
from the hercule-poirot-to-the-white-phone-please dept.
reporter writes "According to a front-page story by The Guardian, British authorities have identified Andrei Lugovoi to be the murderer who used radioactive pollonium-210 to kill Andrei Litvinenko. The British government will ask Moscow to extradite Lugovoi. The Guardian states: 'Associates of the dead man have repeatedly accused President Vladimir Putin's government of being behind his murder, a claim the Kremlin rejects. While it is known that detectives believe they have uncovered evidence pointing to Mr Lugovoi's involvement, it is not clear whether they have established a motive for the murder'"
The Courts

First Spammer Convicted Under CAN-SPAM Law 226

Posted by Zonk
from the everyone-else-is-sending-greeting-cards dept.
eldavojohn writes "Spammer Jeffrey Brett Goodin has been convicted under the 2003 CAN-SPAM Act, the first person in the U.S. prosecuted successfully under the law. He is facing a sentence of up to 101 years in a federal prison after being found guilty of numerous illegal acts. According to prosecutors, Goodin was convicted on multiple counts in addition to the CAN-SPAM conviction, including wire fraud, unauthorized use of credit cards, misuse of the AOL trademark and attempted witness harassment. From the article: 'The law forbids e-mail marketers from sending false or misleading messages and requires them to provide recipients with a way to opt out of receiving future mailings. During trial, prosecutors presented evidence that Goodin used several compromised Internet accounts to send e-mails to America Online users. The e-mails appeared to be from the company's billing department and told customers to update their billing information or lose service.'"
Operating Systems

FreeBSD 6.2 Released To Mirrors 168

Posted by kdawson
from the come-and-get-it dept.
AlanS2002 writes "FreeBSD 6.2 has been released to mirrors. The release notes for your specific platform are also available. FreeBSD is an advanced operating system for x86 compatible (including Pentium and Athlon), amd64 compatible (including Opteron, Athlon64, and EM64T), ARM, IA-64, PC-98, and UltraSPARC architectures. It is derived from BSD, the version of UNIX developed at the University of California, Berkeley. It is developed and maintained by a large team of individuals. Additional platforms are in various stages of development."
The Courts

SCO Bankruptcy "Imminent, Inevitable" 234

Posted by kdawson
from the quebrada dept.
mattaw writes "From analysis by Groklaw it seems that SCO may owe Novell nearly all the SCOSource licensing fees, and has been hiding the fact for 3 years. Imminent. Inevitable. Bankruptcy. Those are the words from Novell's lawyers. Perhaps the IBM/SCO case could close earlier than planned? Perhaps we can finally be rid of this specter once and for all?"
Google

Firefox Creator No Longer Trusts Google 528

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the watching-the-watchmen dept.
watashi writes "Blake Ross the man whose scratched itch became the Firefox browser explains on his blog why he has a problem with Google's policy of promoting their own products over competitors' in search results. His main gripe is that the tips (e.g. "Want to share pictures? Try Google Picasa") result in an inability for other products (perhaps even Parakey?) to compete for the top slot on Google."
Nintendo

+ - Nintendo sued over Wiimote design

Submitted by uchihalush
uchihalush (898615) writes "In the Nintendo playground, California company Interlink Electronics [http://www.interlinkelectronics.com] isn't playing nice. They claim that the Wiimote design belongs to them and that they patented it first. According to the Patent [http://patft.uspto.gov], Interlink Electronic describes an electronic device with the button/trigger layout similar to the Wiimote, but not the actual use of the device. Amidst all the lawyer-speak, we see no traces of their remote using movement in a 3D environment to operate their "electronic pointing device" like the Wiimote. Their pointing device talks of using the buttons and trigger on the remote to cause movement on screen, acting more like an infra-red mouse than a gaming controller. Next Gen Covers the Story [http://ww.next-gen.biz/]"
Patents

+ - Disputed patent leads to fatal shooting in Chicago

Submitted by theshowmecanuck
theshowmecanuck (703852) writes "After reading about the shooting in a patent office in Chicago yesterday, I thought about the phrase "the pen is mightier than the sword". It is usually taken to mean our ideas hold much more power than a piece of steel. But what if someone steals our ideas. The feeling of being violated and left powerless to do anything about it can in turn make someone feel like they have been backed into a corner so to speak. We know that anything in the animal kingdom backed into a corner is very dangerous. So when Joe Jackson felt he was cheated out of his alleged idea for a toilet in a truck, he killed the man he felt was responsible for the transgression. Is this what happens when the "haves" take too much from the "have-nots" in America? Or is it what happens when the only recourse to settling IP disputes is by hiring the high priced lawyers who are often minding the IP cookie jar, and: a) you don't have enough money to pay to see it to the end, b) the lawyer might be unscrupulous and steal your idea and you can't afford to fight him for it (I am definitely not saying that is the case here), or c) all of the above (etc.)? If so, how do the Joes of the world have any chance? I know a guy who sells a novel piece of electronics for guitar amps, and just encases the circuit in an opaque epoxy cube to hide it... it was cheaper and safer than hiring a patent lawyer... but not all ideas can be protected that way."

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