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Submission + - 'Minority Report' Interfaces Come to University Research (chronicle.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Colleges libraries are installing giant interactive video walls to let students and scholars look at medical and other scholarly images up close, zoom in and out using gestures. Also they're hoping to get students to get their heads out of their laptop screens to collaborate on projects on the big shared walls. Will Big-Screen Research be the future?
Desktops (Apple)

Submission + - Mac Flashback attack began with Wordpress blogs (eweek.com)

beaverdownunder writes: Alexander Gostev, head of the global research and analysis team at Kaspersky, says that “tens of thousands of sites powered by WordPress were compromised. How this happened is unclear. The main theories are that bloggers were using a vulnerable version of WordPress or they had installed the ToolsPack plug-in.”

Submission + - Apple and Google face salary fixing lawsuit (macworld.com.au)

beaverdownunder writes: Google, Apple, Adobe and Intel have been accused of maintaining an agreement not to poach each other's staff, thus restricting increases in salary and restricting career development.

California District Judge Lucy Koh has found that the plaintiffs have adequately demonstrated antitrust injury. Sparked by a request from the late Steve Jobs, from 2005 to 2007 the defendants had a 'no cold-call' policy of staff recruitment amongst themselves.

Jobs is also alleged to have threatened Palm with litigation for not entering into a 'no cold-call' agreement with Apple.


AT&T's Net Neutrality Doublethink 215

GMGruman writes "George Orwell would be proud of AT&T, as Bill Snyder explains in this blog post, for its new ads saying it supports Net neutrality when in fact it is working actively to scuttle proposed FCC rules that would clearly ban discriminatory practices against different types of data, such as video streaming or VoIP. It's also trying to get government subsidies to build a substandard broadband network for the under-served areas of the US. If it and its carrier partners win, 'Internet freedom' will mean freedom for carriers to be the 21st century's robber barons."

Why Movies Are Not Exactly Like Music 378

Ars digs into the proposition that movies will go the way of the music business, and finds some reasons not to be totally gloomy about Hollywood's immediate future. For one thing, the movie biz managed to introduce a next-generation format to follow the DVD, a trick that eluded the music crowd (anyone remember DVD-Audio? SACD?). Blu-ray isn't making up the gap as DVD sales fall, but it is slowing the revenue decline. Perhaps the most important difference from the music business is that movies aren't amenable to "disaggregation" — unlike CDs, which people stopped buying once they could get the individual songs they really wanted. Ars concludes: "The movie business is facing many of the same challenges that are bedeviling music, but it's not about to go quietly into that good night — and it may not have to."

Submission + - Antitrust probe for Wireless provider texting (eweek.com)

DJRumpy writes: The chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights urges the Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission to examine whether dominant wireless carriers such as AT&T and Verizon are stifling competition with practices that include exclusive arrangements between carriers and cell phone makers, possible text messaging price fixing, and questionable roaming arrangements.

Apparently the new Antitrust chief is doing just that, but hitting resistance from within the administration.

A rock store eventually closed down; they were taking too much for granite.