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Comment: Won't work (Score 1) 174

by ghighi (#48122853) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: VPN Setup To Improve Latency Over Multiple Connections?
Long story short: it won't work. First you would have to convince the device with the two wireless interfaces (the windows PC I suppose) to send the packet on both path. Good luck with that: your typical routing software, including the one in the windows kernel, will choose whatever route it thinks is faster and stick to it. At most you can get some sort of load balancing but it's not what you are describing. If you somewhat manage to duplicate the traffic, TCP should handle that without problems. The impact of dropping half the incoming packets on network performance remains to be seen, however. UDP on the other hand has no way of knowing the absolute sequence of a packet (it's the whole point of UDP after all) and it's left to the in game protocol to deal with duplicate data. I suspect it will fail at some point, defeating the purpose.

Comment: Re:Seriously? (Score 1) 116

by ghighi (#47819717) Attached to: E-Books On a $20 Cell Phone
I have read a lot of books on my Galaxy S3. A lot more on my IPhone 3G before that. A fair amount on a freaking P910i and a M600 (look them up, they have screens like your average contemporary cellphone) before all this. And on my palm Tungsten... You get the idea. The "nothing beat the paper experience" mantra and all its variation are getting old. These are books: the fun is in the words. Now that being said I now read on a 13" Yoga 2 pro and it's great too.

Comment: Re: Funny money (Score 1) 409

Well I for one would like to read actual data. I'm not implying you are wrong or that you don't know what you are talking about, but it doesn't sound that obvious to me. "Renewable" energies is a bad formulation indeed. You are tapping energy from somewhere and as such divert it from it's natural destination. Maybe the effect is negligible but I'd still like to have a better vision. Especially when you consider scaling said energy production method up to the total worldwide energy consumption. After all I'm sure at some point, someone said there was more than enough fossil fuel and that we needn't worry about it.

Comment: Re: Beards and suspenders. (Score 1) 637

by ghighi (#47620409) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?
My main experience as a Dev is Java and most recently C#. I'm not even a Dev anymore, merely a low end sysadmin. And yet the answer you seeked for that question I find obvious. Stop pretending you are smarter because you can find niches of problems where you happen to have relevant answers. Modern developer do not deal with memory allocation anymore, but they work at a level of abstraction with design paradigms which are every bit as complex to grasp than hardware architecture. And when needs be, they are more than capable of fixing problems with endianness or memory allocation. Looks to me that the good ones are every bit as good as the old ones...

+ - NASA Begin Testing New Lightweight, Revolutionary Space Propulsion->

Submitted by Zanadou
Zanadou (1043400) writes "NASA has been testing new space travel technologies throughout its entire history, but the results of its latest experiment may be the most exciting yet — if they hold up. Earlier this week at a conference in Cleveland, Ohio, scientists with NASA's Eagleworks Laboratories in Houston, Texas, presented a paper indicating they had achieved a small amount of thrust from a container that had no traditional fuels, only microwaves, bouncing around inside it. If the results can be replicated reliably and scaled up — and that's a big "if," since NASA only produced them on a very small scale over a two-day period — they could ultimately result in ultra-light weight, ultra fast spacecraft that could carry humans to Mars in weeks instead of months, and to the nearest star system outside our own (Proxima Centurai) in just about 30 years.

The type of container NASA tested was based on a model for a new space engine that doesn't use weighty liquid propellant or nuclear reactors, called a Cannae Drive; a variation of the controversial EmDrive."

Link to Original Source

Comment: ignores (Score 1) 246

by ghighi (#47589923) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: IT Personnel As Ostriches?
You can't be liable for having knowledge of information that people couldn't be bothered to encrypt. Executives can be lazy with their data and you can't be expected to do special efforts when they didn't do any to begin with. That being said, I would chose to ignore. I have been there, with information very sensible for a very big company, and just ignored that. A colleagues acted upon that same knowledge in not so subtle way and we almost got troubles for it; it was harmless so they pretended they did not realise we had access to the documents and left it at that. It could get you fired though, so you might want to just stfu. Now there would be two exception to that rule: I you were in a position where you could blow the whistle on some important information for the public good, or if you could get personal gains in the process. It's a moral decision q:

Comment: Re: Skynet, here we come! (Score 1) 38

by ghighi (#45869243) Attached to: Augmented-Reality Contact Lens Prototype Coming To CES
I have been wearing contact for a few years now and they have been a good send. For starters no one knows I can't see for sh*t (whereas wearing glasses put you in a different social category altogether) and my ability to look at my surroundings has greatly improved. I would really spend a lot for a display of that kind.

Comment: Commercial solutions (Score 1) 414

by ghighi (#31907156) Attached to: What Is the Future of Firewalls?
Some commercial solutions handle this as well. I used to have a set of hardware FW that would all share a central repository of rules, each box applying the rule as they need it. It also came with intrusion detection and prevention, and auto vpn tunel meshing between box, so all was neatly availlable in the same configuration tool; wich was not so good looking, but was still significantly faster than manual edition. At the end of the day, one could revert to full text based administration and find oneself in a familiar unix-like environment.

Unfortunately, it ended up being a lot less reliable than what was previously thought.

Comment: The point being? (Score 1) 638

by ghighi (#29512879) Attached to: Soviets Built a Doomsday Machine; It's Still Alive
Ok this thing is creepy and could be in your next spy blockbuster, but isn't the assured retarliation the whole point behind nuclear submarines?
They are roaming the seas and nobody knows exactly where they are, and could certainly be triggered if some catastrophic event happened to the mother country. Certainly radio transmissions are less reliable in nature (interrupted transmission doesn't mean a severed wire) but some system could certainly be worked out. And anyway MAD is a lot more likelly to bring the world to its doom via paranoÃd reaction or plain human mistake than it is by technological failure.
I'll stick with the submarines.

Comment: Really good OS (Score 1) 303

by ghighi (#29423231) Attached to: OpenSolaris vs. Linux, For Linux Users
I am not an OS guru but it seemed to me that Solaris is by far the most powerfull kernel available for the x86 platform. Good kernel don't mean good and user friendly OSs, but Solaris has, IIRC, virtualisation and filesystem features that linux and windows could only dream of. It's Unix firepower for your home.

With Oracle swalowing Sun I'm afraid we'll live the same situation as with DEC back in the days: a decade from now, we will look back at Solaris and Java technologies and say 'man, they really invented everything'.

On a side comment I wonder how such companies manage to remain largely unprofitable with such good technologies in their portfolio.

Comment: Re:Yep (Score 1) 177

by ghighi (#29311343) Attached to: The Design Failures That Led To <em>Rock Band</em>
I know it's kind of off topic, but you'd be surprised at how good you can get at playing popular music with little effort. You can even get to compose good popular music with minimum training.
Also I like the way you put Adam Jones and Tom Morello in your list. Know what they have in common? They compose GREAT music that's relatively simple to play - 70% of what i play as a beginer come from one or the other, actually.
So if you are into psycho-prog-rock-metal, you could very well be the next Adam Jones.

I think it is equally harmless to suggest people to try the real thing. If they like music they could be missing something under the false assumptions that it's 'too late' or 'too difficult'. Like I did during so many year (although me finally picking the guitar is not related with Guitar Hero games).

Comment: Re:You're wrong. (Score 1) 150

by ghighi (#28555097) Attached to: The Hysteria of the Cyber-Warriors
I second this statement. What I learned in my short time studying computer security is that there is a potential for large damage to be made.

I would even go so far as to say i'm surprised no large scale attack ever happened. We can be thankfull that the bad guys switched from a "damage dealing" to a "money making" state of mind.

What's even funnier is that all the technology and good practice are readilly available to *greatly* mitigate the risks but there is a clear lack of skill and will in most places.

Comment: Re:Don't virii evolve extremely quickly? (Score 1) 104

by ghighi (#28022693) Attached to: Gene Transfer Immunizes Against Monkey HIV Analog
Drawback #1: I can't have sex with anybody.
Do I need to go further?

Keeping the sex in mariage is a moral answer to a medical problem. Can't work.
Teaching 'safe sex' is a much better approach. You are advised not to sleep carelessly with someone but without the moral incentive.

That's like saying abandoning cars are the solution to car related death, all the while considering it a sin to move faster than what speed god gave you at birth.
If you can't find the drawback then stick with monogamy and sex in marriage, it's fine by me.

Every nonzero finite dimensional inner product space has an orthonormal basis. It makes sense, when you don't think about it.

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