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Comment: Re:Rural Michigan? (Score 2) 86

There are PLENTY of places in the rural United States that would love better connectivity. But I guess those places are tied too tightly to the ISPs. They are doing it for a better quality of life while here in the States we worry too much about making our money back in a timely manner, ("What?! You mean it'll be 5 years until that infrastructure is paid for?!") so a lot of people really do miss out.

Comment: Might as well follow us around... (Score 1) 550

by germany-runt (#39286613) Attached to: Why Making Facebook Private Won't Protect You
I mean hey...if they want to see our "private" facebook page, they might as well pay a private investigator to follow us around and see what we are up to in case we forget to post something to facebook. I'm sure there were a few "shady" things I've done that an employer would love to know but outside of the 8-4 they don't have much of a right to know what I'm up to. Maybe I'm wrong but I guess there should be an certain expectation of privacy. Then again, if they really want to see my facebook profile they will see how boring my life is and how I only post pictures of my dog.

+ - How to measure to nanosecond resolution cheaply?

Submitted by muxmux
muxmux (1907330) writes "Working with a somewhat quiet start-up dealing in a few nanos for some market feed gear. Yeah, crazy speeds, I know... Have traditionally used some third party 10G based timers with good trustworthy open source wireshark interfaces to show timing in tech demos. Nice gear but they are only accurate to about 20ns (125MHz clock accurate to 2-4 cycles) which is not quite good enough when trying to measure single digit nanosec overheads. Rather than dragging an expensive oscilloscope around to clients to highlight performance, can any one suggest a convenient and trustworthy way to show differences of about a ns?"
Science

+ - Park Spark Transforms Dog Doo Into Light->

Submitted by ElectricSteve
ElectricSteve (1655317) writes "It'(TM)s definitely a good thing that so many dog owners scoop their pooches'(TM) poop, but what happens to that waste after it's been bagged and discarded isn't so great... usually it ends up fermenting in a landfill, where it poses a health risk, attracts vermin, and releases harmful methane gas into the atmosphere. Pickling it and turning it into plant fertilizer is one option, but American conceptual artist Matthew Mazzotta would like to see it fed into digesters that use it to produce methane gas, which is then used for fuel. To that end, he has created a sort of demonstration project/art installation called Park Spark, at a dog park in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It features a lamp that lights the park at night, powered by nothing but canine doo-doo."
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