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Comment: Re:Of course there is a focus on the negative (Score 0) 208

by geekmux (#48666535) Attached to: The World Is Not Falling Apart

You have sites like Fox News turning relatively moderate conservatives into extream conservatives. Due to the flood of negativity poison. Where before many issues were not a big deal or some supported it, now have became a polarizing issue.

Polarizing issue?

That's a very good description of the world we live in today, for those "issues" were electrified long ago by lawyers.

Yes, it would help if every damn thing we form an opinion on today wasn't able to be turned into a lawsuit of some kind.

Which it can be.

And is.

This of course sets this little thing called precedent, which brings me right back around to that electrically charged society hell-bent on getting the opportunity to "strike it rich" some day through litigation.

No wonder people play. Lawyers created odds far better than the lottery, that's for damn sure.

Comment: Re:How ghey (Score 1) 43

by geekmux (#48666037) Attached to: NuSTAR Takes Beautiful X-ray Image of Sol

"Sol" is simply Latin for "Sun". It is not some official sceintific designator for our star, despite what the ghey community thinks.

I'm surprised Slashdot still referrs to the moon as "the moon", instead of the Latin, "Luna".

Yeah, really.

I mean, just how dumb would we have to be to start using Latin to designate official scientific designa...what's that? The medical community you say? And the entire animal kingdom? Botany too?

Well, yeah, I do know where we got the word science from. Gee, it's like there's some kind of weird pattern here that some Homo sapien created a long time ago...

Comment: Threat vs. Capability? Tell that to US Gov. (Score 0) 580

by geekmux (#48625975) Attached to: Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

"Here, we need to distinguish between threat and capability—the ability to steal gossipy emails from a not-so-great protected computer network is not the same thing as being able to carry out physical, 9/11-style attacks in 18,000 locations simultaneously. I can't believe I'm saying this. I can't believe I have to say this."

If you're struggling to understand why you have to dispel fear-mongering at this level, perhaps I should remind you of the trillions invested by our own Government to justify the please-remove-your-shoes-before-boarding-the-aircraft department.

Seems our own Government has NO qualms whatsoever about overreacting, so stop wondering where the paranoia comes from already.

Comment: Re:Man, am I old ... (Score 1) 173

by geekmux (#48620477) Attached to: Backblaze's 6 TB Hard Drive Face-Off

It's harder for me to listen to users justify their "need" for several hundred gigabytes or even terabytes of storage for their personal archives.

Call somebody a pat rat hoarder in real life and they'll likely become horribly offended. Accuse them of the same thing in virtual space, and they wear it like a badge of honor.

I wonder if the average consumer realizes that when they die, no one will give a shit about going through terabytes of crap.

Hoarding physical objects takes up increasing amounts of physical space. Instead of a basement filled with a hundred boxes, I have 8 TB of archived data that takes up about the same amount of physical space as a single hard cover book.

And I couldn't care less what anyone else thinks of my terabytes of stuff. it's for me, not them. And when I die I'm sure they'll just throw it out and free up those few precious square inches of 'wasted' space.

The entire point here is your data isn't even for you when there's a damn good chance that you will never look at 90% of it ever again.

Convenience is not a substitution for pure, unadulterated laziness. Buying a huge warehouse doesn't fix the problem of hoarding any more than buying a larger hard drive does.

Comment: Re:Man, am I old ... (Score 1) 173

by geekmux (#48620207) Attached to: Backblaze's 6 TB Hard Drive Face-Off

Those aren't iPhone JPEGs, but ~20 Mpixel RAW files, and there are thousands of them each month - closer to 10k, really. These days it's really easy to generate vast numbers of pictures when you have a good camera. When she shoots kids, it's 10 shots per second, often until the buffer fills up after 50-60 shots. I'd say she takes on average 300 shots per day. It really doesn't take very long to have that many. If the camera was any faster, it'd have been more I'm afraid :)

Not even with a "good" camera does the average consumer generate that much data, especially every single day. Remember that more pictures have been taken with an iPhone than any other piece of image-recording hardware in human history, so even owning a "good" camera these days is considered an oddity.

And 10 shots per second outputting to RAW file format is hardly recreational. You're not sharing those over MMS with the grandparents, and Kim Kardashian doesn't take that many pictures in a day, and she wrote the book on selfies. Literally.

I guess the "hard" part to understand here is you accepting the fact that your usage profile only represents 0.001% of society.

And my original point still stands regarding data hoarding. No one is going to sort through terabytes of data when you die. No one.

Comment: Re:Man, am I old ... (Score 0) 173

by geekmux (#48618543) Attached to: Backblaze's 6 TB Hard Drive Face-Off

I remember punching the side of 360K floppies to get another 360K on the other side.

Now you can buy a couple of gigs of USB drive next to the gum in the express lane at Wal Mart.

This stuff is awesome and all, but sometimes it's hard to really wrap my head around that pretty much everything about computers (except for physical size) is a billion times bigger than when I started using computers.

It really is hard to explain to people that at one point your entire digital life was about 20 floppy disks in a plastic case, and that what was once a completely hypothetical amount of storage is commonplace.

It's harder for me to listen to users justify their "need" for several hundred gigabytes or even terabytes of storage for their personal archives.

Call somebody a pat rat hoarder in real life and they'll likely become horribly offended. Accuse them of the same thing in virtual space, and they wear it like a badge of honor.

I wonder if the average consumer realizes that when they die, no one will give a shit about going through terabytes of crap.

Comment: Re:Not a cargo ship (Score 1) 116

by geekmux (#48618269) Attached to: New Cargo Ship Is 488 Meters Long

It should not even be compared to ships.

If it can move under it's own power it's a ship.

Uh, we also label those things flying around in zero gravity "ships" too.

This logic is fucked no matter how you look at it, but hey let's keep inviting the Navy to steer those nomenclature meetings across every industry...

Comment: Re:Perfect (Score 2) 175

by geekmux (#48616429) Attached to: Researchers Accidentally Discover How To Turn Off Skin Aging Gene

Instead of trying save people from the ravages of heart attacks, they'll all be golden parachuting into their new startup selling this crap to vain and insecure one-percenters at immoral levels of profit.

Before completely writing it off, perhaps we wait and see what useful things could also come of this technology, to include funding the original research with "immoral" profits.

Comment: Re:Does the job still get done? (Score 2) 679

by geekmux (#48615761) Attached to: Economists Say Newest AI Technology Destroys More Jobs Than It Creates

If the job still gets done it's a good thing that jobs gets replaced by AI. The flaw isn't in who does the work, but how the economic system around it is set up.

The economic "system" in front of you today is slightly divided between the 99% and the 1%.

And that gap continues to grow more and more every day, with the "system" not really giving a shit about those who are now unemployed, unless you want to define Government welfare as an acceptable "system" for the future.

There will have to be a considerable model shift in the future. You may only have one citizen working for every 20 people. We can assume families won't grow that large, so this does mean a single income supporting more than one household.

That model doesn't really exist today other than by force (taxes), and it will be interesting to see how the great divide will handle that.

Comment: US Corporation... (Score 2) 170

by geekmux (#48614409) Attached to: Verizon "End-to-End" Encrypted Calling Includes Law Enforcement Backdoor

...US Laws.

'nuff said.

No, seriously, can we please stop being shocked and appalled over the (ancient) concept that a US Corporation would beholden a US Citizen with any form of communications service that also contains a back door for the US Government? The OMGWTFEFF attitude is wearing thin.

US Corporation. US Laws. CALEA is twenty years old now. You have no Right to privacy anymore with any US-based communications service.

Oh, and according to this Administration, you just might be a terrorist if you think or assume otherwise. Have fun.

Comment: Re:What authority do senators have? (Score 2) 76

by geekmux (#48611585) Attached to: Uber Limits 'God View' To Improve Rider Privacy

He's just "respectfully requesting" the answers. Those are his words.

However, the correct reading of those words is more like "If you don't want your entire business to be illegal in a year, I suggest you explain to me and my colleagues why we shouldn't make that happen, because even members of the other party will get a lot more sympathetic to that idea if they find out you've been dissing the position they and I both hold. By the way, if I call the executive branch and ask them politely to look really hard at any existing laws you may be breaking, they will take my call a lot faster than they'll take yours.".

Gee, sure would be nice if our elected representatives went after the NSA like this when it comes to protecting user privacy...

I mean we're only talking about illegalities on a Constitutional level, being performed by a government agency and paid for by US Citizens. What could possibly go wrong...

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