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Comment Re:Legality? (Score 1) 324

Yahoo EULA under section 2:

You also understand and agree that the Service may include advertisements and that these advertisements are necessary for Yahoo to provide the Service.

Yahoo EULA under section 16:

You agree that Yahoo shall not be responsible or liable for any loss or damage of any sort incurred as the result of any such dealings or as the result of the presence of such advertisers on the Service.

Ruling in favor of EULAs: Vernor v. Autodesk


NASA Eagleworks Has Tested an Upgraded EM Drive 203

An anonymous reader writes: A team of researchers at NASA's Eagleworks Laboratories recently completed yet another round of testing on Engineer Roger Shawyer's controversial EM Drive. While no peer reviewed paper has been published yet, engineer Paul March posted to the NASA Spaceflight forum to explain the group's findings. From the article: "In essence, by utilizing an improved experimental procedure, the team managed to mitigate some of the errors from prior tests — yet still found signals of unexplained thrust."
The Courts

Germany Says Taking Photos Of Food Infringes The Chef's Copyright 280

xPertCodert writes: According to this article in Der Welt (Google translate from German), in Germany if you take a picture of a dish in a restaurant without prior permission, you are violating chef's copyright for his creation and can be liable to pay a hefty fine. If this approach to foodporn will become universal, what will we put in our Instagrams? Techdirt reports: "Apparently, this situation goes back to a German court judgment from 2013, which widened copyright law to include the applied arts too. As a result, the threshold for copyrightability was lowered considerably, with the practical consequence that it was easier for chefs to sue those who posted photographs of their creations without permission. The Die Welt article notes that this ban can apply even to manifestly unartistic piles of food dumped unceremoniously on a plate if a restaurant owner puts up a notice refusing permission for photos to be taken of its food."

Comment Re:So.... (Score 2, Insightful) 222

More like "copyright sucks, but it won't change until the bad actors abusing it get it applied back at them."

It's kinda like how Christians (weirdly) try to stuff the Ten Commandments down the throats of everyone by sanctioning the display of all religious artifacts on public land but then repeal the law once Satanists start trolling them with their own memorials on government grounds. Same basic idea.

We're living in a golden age. All you need is gold. -- D.W. Robertson.