Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:What now? 1 billion! (Score 1) 192

by EvanED (#46781839) Attached to: Apache OpenOffice Reaches 100 Million Downloads. Now What?

I would vote Excel in that contest. To me, comparing Excel to Python/matplotlib harkens a lot of the comparison of something like Python to a compiled language. The former gives you a REPL that lets you interact with your language easily, you can make changes and see them reflected without recompiling, etc. Well, Excel takes that one step further: with it, you don't have to do anything: as you change the input data, the calculated data changes immediately. With Python and matplotlib (at least as much as I've seen it), you don't have to recompile but you do have to re-run your script or take some other action besides just changing the data to get it to regraph (or else start writing your own wrapper).

Or not everything is graphing either. For instance, suppose you're picking between different mortgages and want to compare a few different scenarios. You can have cells for the interest rate, nominal loan time, points, extra prepayments, etc. and then have cells to calculate the total interest paid, actual loan time, etc. Want to see what an additional 1% does to your rate? Change 3.5% to 4.5% and... you see the effect.

Finally, I think spreadsheets often make data entry easier as well as just looking at tables easier. You can just grab and resize columns if something doesn't fit, as opposed to go and manually respace things. Entering data going down in a spreadsheet column is about as easy as it gets because you have an enter button on your 10-key: it's easier to type "17 25 4 12" than "17 25 4 12" even ignoring row vs column-ness.

At least personally, when I use a spreadsheet instead of going to Python/matplotlib or something else, those are usually the reasons why.

Comment: Re:Good. (Score 1) 89

by EvanED (#46780947) Attached to: RCMP Arrest Canadian Teen For Heartbleed Exploit

Second, he for your analogy basically stood outside and asked for some secrets and the homeowner yelled them back at him.

That's like saying someone who breaks into a house by throwing a brick through the window merely lets go of a brick when it has a particular trajectory and the glass just got out of their way.

Comment: Re:You can probably thank Microsoft for this... (Score 1) 192

by EvanED (#46780503) Attached to: Apache OpenOffice Reaches 100 Million Downloads. Now What?

Sure there were some incremental changes that took advantage of newer technologies, some new UI changes that I am not sure if it makes things better

This is going to sound like a shill, but I promise it's not; I've actually been really impressed with the Office UI changes post-2007. (For purposes of this discussion, let's forget about whether the ribbon itself was a good idea (I am actually pretty indifferent, to be honest) and just assume it's here to stay.) A few years back I went to work on a PowerPoint presentation in 2010 on a shared computer, than later continued work using 2007 on my own. And I definitely missed some of the changes -- where 2010 made much more accessible some operations that were more buried in 2007. And recently I was doing some collaborative work in Word 2013, and there were a couple minor but still nice changes to the way comments and track-changes were displayed in comparison to what I was used to (and have reason to believe changed since 2010).

I'm by no means a heavy Office user -- there will be weeks that go by where I almost don't open any Office programs. But at the same time, (1) they are making UI improvements and (2) I definitely don't think you can dismiss UI improvements for programs like these -- in some sense, 98% of the program is the UI for something like Word. Word's not doing any heavy computation behind the scenes that's the real thing you're interested in.

Comment: Re:I wonder how much damage... (Score 1) 192

by EvanED (#46780379) Attached to: Apache OpenOffice Reaches 100 Million Downloads. Now What?

OTOH, it is my wish that no one use MS Powerpoint anymore. It is dated and ugly

There's not a lot of good choices. And by "not a lot", I mean... pretty much 0, to be honest. Keynote might be one, but I haven't really used it and my standard line is that I don't want to spend a thousand dollars on presentation software, even if it does come with a free computer. (My other standard line -- re. Hackintoshes -- is that I try to have grown out of pirating and if Apple doesn't want me to give them money for a working legit copy, then fine, I wont.) Some other options like some of the HTML presentation libraries are kind of intriguing, and I haven't had cause to play around with them -- but I'm tempted they wouldn't be worth the added hassle of using separate programs to make a bunch of images and then having those images sit around in separate files.

And as tired as PPT is, Impress is still basically shit in comparison. PowerPoint is pretty much the best of a bad lot, IMO.

Comment: What's the purpose? (Score 1) 249

by PPH (#46780261) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: System Administrator Vs Change Advisory Board

I assume you have various individuals/groups who have an interest in the systems you administrate. Users, developers, etc. Also regulators. Don't forget the utility of a good documentation system when the auditors come around*. So you need a process to keep them informed of the upcomming system changes. So they can ensure that their product or process isn't going to be broken by a change.

If you have relatively few of thes interested parties, the communications could be mandles manually and by you. If that community is large, the procedures need to be formalized and possibly automated. Having a CAB to represent your user community can offload the communications task from you. At the expense of some paperwork.

On the other hand, I've worked in organizations where the CAB was a make-work task for a few layers of management. People whos only other job prospects are standing by an off-ramp with a cardboard sign*.

*At one of my previous jobs, this was the acid test of the utility of our CAB. I had to fill out stacks of paperwork and await their blessing to make a change. But strangely enough, whenever the FAA came around, they were nowhere to be found. I had to walk the auditors through our systems myself.

Comment: Re:Weak (Score 1) 220

by gbjbaanb (#46778623) Attached to: Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

eh?

Assuming intelligent design for a moment, we were designed for stuff our ancestors were used to - running about and generally standing up.,

We were not ever designed to slouch in front of a TV/monitor with a little tool in our hands waggling it up and down (or side to side) pressing buttons.

So,much as I really don't care if ID is true or fantasy, citing proof of our sedentary lifestyles is not and argument against it.

Comment: Re:I switched from sitting to standing. (Score 4, Interesting) 218

by swillden (#46778589) Attached to: Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

I'd recommend a standing desk to anyone with the willpower to make it through the transition.

And I'd recommend a sit-stand desk to anyone at all. Even if you don't stand all the time (I don't), being able to spend part of your day standing will make you feel better without discomfort, in fact being able to switch back and forth is more comfortable than sitting.

Comment: Re:Information = Wealth = Power (Score 1) 98

by swillden (#46778561) Attached to: Google Looked Into Space Elevator, Hoverboards, and Teleportation

Then it's not the same as mine. I've also followed the company from the beginning... and I have the benefit of the insider view.

Unless your insider view involved board meetings making top-level executive decisions, I'm not impressed.

Obviously not, but you may not realize how open the company is internally. Larry Page stands up in front of the entire company every week, for example, and takes -- and answers -- live questions. There are no negative consequences for asking hard questions, and hard questions do get asked. Sometimes the executives duck or dance around them, but not very often, and questions that aren't really answered continue getting asked until they do get answered.

In addition to that, other than things like acquisitions there are very few "top-level executive decisions" at Google. Most decisionmaking is driven from the bottom up.

You're probably still not impressed. Whatever. I'm just giving you my perspective and opinion. I would think that an intelligent insider's viewpoint would be of use to you; you're certainly free to dismiss it, whether or not that makes any sense. Time will tell, and I'm quite confident that the future will bear out my statements.

YouTube was a very obvious acquisition. What YouTube needed to survive and grow was low-cost scalability and a way to monetize the views it was getting. What Google had was massive data centers and network connectivity, plus a proven revenue model.

YouTube managed to grow to epic proportions before Google had to "save" them, as you imply. They also good have slapped ads onto their service at any time without Google buying them out.

Not according to YouTube employees who made the transition.

Comment: Re:Not sure how standing up would solve anything.. (Score 2) 218

by swillden (#46778219) Attached to: Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

...when the main problem isn't really sitting down, but being STILL in the same position hour after hour.

This is why it's not a "standing desk" but a "sit-stand desk". The idea is that you alternate between sitting and standing, changing position every hour or two.

Comment: Re:Information = Wealth = Power (Score 1) 98

by swillden (#46778179) Attached to: Google Looked Into Space Elevator, Hoverboards, and Teleportation

My basis is the same as yours, except not from the inside, and not from just three years.

Then it's not the same as mine. I've also followed the company from the beginning... and I have the benefit of the insider view.

The tipping point came when they bought YouTube for an obscene amount of money (at the time). You don't spread your tendrils in such fashion throughout the industry just because you like technology.

YouTube was a very obvious acquisition. What YouTube needed to survive and grow was low-cost scalability and a way to monetize the views it was getting. What Google had was massive data centers and network connectivity, plus a proven revenue model. YouTube also needed a better search engine, and Google was interested in finding ways to index and search non-textual content. It was an ideal match, technologically.

Comment: Re:Are you still partying like its 1999, or what? (Score 2) 249

by gbjbaanb (#46777525) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: System Administrator Vs Change Advisory Board

oh god Remedy....I used that once.

But the concept is good- you need a 'bug tracker' where the requests for patches can be made to you, and you can then assign tot he CCB. Once they agree it, then assign it back to you for implementation.

Any dev bugtracker will provide you with this kind of audit trail - think 'requirements' for the CCB authorisation, 'development' for the implementation, 'test' for the testing. You might want to rename these though.

I'd make it web based so access is simple for everyone involved - last thing you need is a Excel based solution. I've used Mantis, or Redmine but Bugzilla would work too as would any number of web based bug/task tracker tools. Get one installed before someone on the CCB says "we'll use a spreadsheet", seriously.

We are experiencing system trouble -- do not adjust your terminal.

Working...