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Scientists Identify Head of France's King Henry IV Screenshot-sm 64

JThaddeus writes "The Associated Press reports that 'After nine months of tests, researchers in France have identified the head of France's King Henry IV.' Henry was assassinated in 1610, and his head has been missing. His body was dug up and decapitated during the French Revolution. Researchers found features similar to those in royal portraits, and radiocarbon dating confirms that the head dates to the 17th Century. Interestingly, 'Perfumers on the team used their professionally trained noses to identify specific embalming substances in the mouth used to hide nasty odors.' The results have been published an online medical journal."

200 Students Admit Cheating After Professor's Online Rant Screenshot-sm 693

Over 200 University of Central Florida students admitted to cheating on a midterm exam after their professor figured out at least a third of his class had cheated. In a lecture posted on YouTube, Professor Richard Quinn told the students that he had done a statistical analysis of the grades and was using other methods to identify the cheats, but instead of turning the list over to the university authorities he offered the following deal: "I don't want to have to explain to your parents why you didn't graduate, so I went to the Dean and I made a deal. The deal is you can either wait it out and hope that we don't identify you, or you can identify yourself to your lab instructor and you can complete the rest of the course and the grade you get in the course is the grade you earned in the course."

Grateful Dead Percussionist Makes Music From Supernovas 57

At the "Cosmology At the Beach" conference earlier this month, Grammy-award winning percussionist Mickey Hart performed a composition inspired by the eruptions of supernovae. "Keith Jackson, a Berkeley Lab computer scientist who is also a musician, lent his talents to the project, starting with gathering data from astrophysicists like those at the Berkeley Lab’s Nearby Supernova Factory, which collects data from telescopes in space and on earth to quickly detect and analyze short-lived supernovas. 'If you think about it, it's all electromagnetic data — but with a very high frequency,' Jackson said of the raw data. "What we did is turn it into sound by slowing down the frequency and "stretching" it into an audio form. Both light and sound are all wave forms — just at different frequencies. Our goal was to turn the electromagnetic data into audio data while still preserving the science.'"

Submission + - Largest Viking Treasure Unearthed on English Farm (

Invisible Pink Unicorn writes: "One of the largest known hoards of Viking treasures has been uncovered by a father and son on a farm in northern England. The collection of coins and jewelry was buried over 1,000 years ago, and includes items from Ireland, France, Russia and Scandinavia. It's the largest such find in over 160 years. In all, more than 600 coins and dozens of other objects, including a gold arm band, silver ingots and fragments of silver were found in and around the container. According to an expert from the British Museum, at least some of the treasure was taken by force, possibly in raids on northern Europe or Scandinavia. The article includes an impressive photograph of the entire collection."

Journal Journal: Patent Reform Moves Backwards

The house judiciary committee has approved legislation to reform the U.S. patent system. Much of what is being proposed is unlikely to make the system any better, however.

PC World has the story of the committee's efforts to reform the patent system. Highlights include:

We're here to give you a computer, not a religion. - attributed to Bob Pariseau, at the introduction of the Amiga