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Submission + - Nokia closed application store in China for N9

jppiiroinen writes: It seems that Nokia is slowly killing existing applications for their Linux based N9 mobile phone which are available thru their store. As a developer who has published paid (and free) apps, it looks like that after their final blow of killing the support for paid applications in China, where the main revenue came from, there is not any means to make money, and no reason to maintain apps anymore. What this means also for the end-users; no premium apps, like Angry Birds.

There was no heads-up or anything, just a single email without any means to make a complain.

Nokia, So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish.

Submission + - EHSM: Exceptionally Hard & Soft Meeting in Berlin (dangerousprototypes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Are you sad that the 29C3 will take place in Hamburg but you want to visit Berlin ? As seen on dangerousprototypes.com, "(...) the premiere of the uniquely named Exceptionally Hard and Soft Meeting (EHSM) (...) will be held in Berlin, Germany on December 28-30, 2012. “EHSM is turning out to be something like the OSH Summit this side of the pond. (...)” " The schedule looks like a pile of refined geek pr0n: Garage electronic parts manufacture, CPU design, nuclear physics...
The Internet

Submission + - Russia, China to Have Greater Control Over Internet (reuters.com)

kodiaktau writes: A proposal put forth by Russia, China, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Sudan and the United Arab Emirates seeks to give more control and government of internet addressing. The move would basically undermine ICANN and decentralize control of internet addressing.

Submission + - Former Anon spokesperson indicted for allegedly linking to stolen information (arstechnica.com)

SternisheFan writes: On Friday, a federal grand jury in Dallas indicted Barrett Brown, a former self-proclaimed Anonymous spokesperson, for trafficking “stolen authentication features,” as well as "access device fraud" and “aggravated identity theft.” Brown has been detained since he was arrested in September for allegedly threatening a federal agent. 10 counts of the 12 count indictment concern the aggravated identity theft charge (the indictment references 10 people from whom Brown is alleged to have stolen information), but the most interesting charge is probably the first; a single count saying Brown, “did knowingly traffic in more than five authentication features knowing that such features were stolen and produced without lawful authority.” But rather than a physical back-alley hand-off, this alleged trafficking happened online when Barrett transferred a hyperlink, “from the Internet Relay Chat (IRC) channel called '#Anonops' to an IRC channel under Brown's control, called '#ProjectPM.'” That hyperlink happened to include over 5,000 credit card numbers, associating Ids, and Card Verification Values (CVVs) from the Stratfor Global Intelligence database.

Submission + - A U.S. Apple factory may be robot city (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: Apple's planned investment of $100 million next year in a U.S. manufacturing facility is relatively small, but still important. A 2009 Apple video of its unibody manufacturing process has glimpses of highly automated robotic systems shaping the metal. In it, Jonathan Ive, Apple's senior vice president of design, described it. "Machining enables a level of precision that is just completely unheard of in this industry," he said. Apple has had three years to improve its manufacturing technology, and will likely rely heavily on automation to hold down labor costs, say analysts and manufacturers. Larry Sweet, the CTO of Symbotic, which makes autonomous mobile robots for use in warehouse distribution, described a possible scenario for Apple’s U.S. factory. First, a robot loads the aluminum block into the robo-machine that has a range of tools for cutting and drilling shapes to produce the complex chassis as a single precision part. A robot then unloads the chassis and sends it down a production line where a series of small, high-precision, high-speed robots insert parts, secured either with snap fit, adhesive bonds, solder, and a few fasteners, such as screws. At the end, layers, such as the display and glass, are added on top and sealed in another automated operation. Finally, the product is packaged and packed into cases for shipping, again with robots. "One of the potentially significant things about the Apple announcement is it could send a message to American companies — you can do this — you can make this work here," said Robert Atkinson, president of The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation.

Submission + - Do you want your mouse spying on you? (hothardware.com)

drkim writes: Razer’s 'Naga' gaming mouse not only needs a connection to the net to activate advanced functions and extra buttons, their ToS lets them harvest 'aggregate,' 'individual,' and 'personally identifiable' information on you. The constant connection to the net can also cause sluggish response during gaming. Remember, here in US, mouse watches you. Another article: http://boingboing.net/2012/11/07/razer-naga-gaming-mouse-requir.html

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Best Laptop With Decent Linux Graphics Support? 4

jcreus writes: After struggling for some years with Nvidia cards (the laptop from which I am writing this has two graphic cards, an Intel one and Nvidia one, and is a holy mess [I still haven't been able to use the Nvidia card]) and, encouraged by Torvalds' middle finger speech, I've decided to ditch Nvidia for something better. I am expecting to buy another laptop and, this time, I'd like to get it right from the start. It would be interesting if it had decent graphics support and, in general, were Linux friendly. While I know Dell has released a Ubuntu laptop, it's way off-budget. My plan is to install Ubuntu, Kubuntu (or even Debian), with dual boot unfortunately required. Thanks in advance, Slashdot!

Submission + - New Structures Self-Assemble in Synchronized Dance (sciencedaily.com)

patella.whack writes: Researchers from the University of Illinois and Northwestern University have demonstrated tiny spheres that synchronize their movements as they self-assemble into a spinning microtube. Such in-motion structures, a blending of mathematics and materials science, could open a new class of technologies with applications in medicine, chemistry and engineering. "It's spontaneous. We don't force it to form," ... "We saw that during the self-assembly process, the synchronization also happens. If you look at the spheres, every one is doing a different thing. Only when they come in close contact will they do something cooperatively." Very cool 2 min video here.

Submission + - MIT develops miniature shape-shifting robots (dvice.com)

SternisheFan writes: Toy robots that can fold into different configurations are fairly common, but these simplistic devices are a far cry from the dream of real-life Transformers. Now a group at MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms has created a robot that could point the way toward the real thing. Developed by lab director Neil Gershenfeld, visiting scientist Ara Knaian, and graduate student Kenneth Cheung, the Milli-Motein is a reconfigurable robot that can be programmed to fold itself into a number of different shapes. And, after the robot has shifted into a new shape, it can hold that shape even when its power is cut off by using a what is known as an electro-permanent motor. Gershenfeld said, "[The Milli-Motein is] effectively a one-dimensional robot that can be made in a continuous strip, without conventionally moving parts, and then folded into arbitrary shapes." However, the project's research paper, recently presented at the 2012 Intelligent Robots and Systems conference, warns that real world deployment of such robots will require cheaper, more durable materials, as well as better software and algorithms.
  See the video at the link below.

Submission + - How to get Gmail to unblock an IPv6 netblock

theonlyholle writes: "For the last couple of weeks I've been trying to somehow get Google to unblock an IPv6 block on their Gmail platform. The problem is that seemingly only one or two spam emails from an IPv6 address seem to trigger their automatic filter and cause it to reject further emails from the entire /64 block to be rejected due to an "unusual" amount of UCE. Of course it's not all that unusual, since I have a few customers who forward their incoming email to Gmail and occasionally a spam email slips through my spam filters. What's really annoying is that a) the filter is on such a hair trigger (I have no such problems on IPv4) and b) there seems to be no way of getting Google to adjust their filters. Has anyone been successful in getting through to Google and having an IPv6 block permanently unblocked?"

Submission + - Whonix: ubiquitous Tor for apps (theregister.co.uk)

gagol writes: Whonix is designed to ensure that applications (such as Flash and Java etc) can only connect through Tor. The design goal, at least, is that direct connections (leaks) ought to be impossible. "This is the only way we know of that can reliably protect your anonymity from client application vulnerabilities and IP/DNS and protocol leaks," the developers explain.

Submission + - Lithium ion battery prices to drop? (anl.gov)

mtrachtenberg writes: "A California company working with Argonne National Labs is talking about a new anode for lithium ion batteries; it claims a 300%+ increase in energy density and is talking about volume manufacturing by 2014.

The company, California Lithium Battery, is talking about a potential 70% price drop in the cost of EV battery packs. If this happens, EVs suddenly begin to make sense."

Submission + - X-Ray Laser for creating supercharged particles (sciencedaily.com)

William Robinson writes: Scientists have found way to use X-Ray Laser for creating supercharged particles. The specific tuning of the laser's properties can cause atoms and molecules to resonate. The resonance excites the atoms and causes them to shake off electrons at a rate that otherwise would require higher energies. This could be used to create highly charged plasma.

All programmers are playwrights and all computers are lousy actors.