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Comment: Re:Linus Torvalds and regression? (Score 1) 186

by fuzzix (#35917476) Attached to: Linux Kernel Suffering Power Management Regression?

I run my recently upgraded desktop (Core i5-2500K) through a power meter and it is very easy to notice - Ubuntu 10.10 (kernel 2.6.35) idles at about 30W, while 11.04 (2.6.38) goes up to 35W. That's about 20% more.

I believe 2.6.36 introduced a problem with DRI on intel and some other video chipsets which led to a shitload of kworker wake ups. One of my laptops running Arch benefitted from a kernel parameters suggestion over here but by that stage I had a menu.lst as long as your arm full of attempts at a functional system (e.g. kernel ... nohz=off highres=off pcie_ports=compat...) each with small, incremental improvements.

You can't catch every regression without owning all hardware and infinite time :)

Comment: Re:scraping the barrel (Score 1) 207

by fuzzix (#35619170) Attached to: 100% Libre, Trisquel 4.5 STS 'Slaine' Released

a whole os, distro and the highlights include enabling http pipelining and including a couple of browser add-ons, switching default search engine
Really ? really ?
That's the problem that needs solving, thru a new disto

Yep, that's right, a whole new distro... to enable something that not everybody thinks is a great idea... I mean, if you want to make 200 http connections per web page have at it, but do it on some other web, not the one that myself and others enjoy traffic from.

Comment: Re:This isn't exactly news... (Score 1) 305

by fuzzix (#33971102) Attached to: Japan's Latest Rockstar Is a 3D Hologram

Erm... yes, that's great and all. Except Hatsune Miku has been around since 2007, and versons of the the Vocaloid software that powers "her" has been around a good bit longer (since 2004 or so, I think). I'm pretty sure I heard reference to special-effects-heavy concerts more than a year ago.

Precisely. Japan's latest rock star is a discovery of the Whitman Campaign. Jerry Brown knows what I'm talkin' 'bout.

Education

+ - How Well Will Linux Handle Future Multicores?->

Submitted by eldavojohn
eldavojohn (898314) writes "Multicore (think tens or hundreds of cores) will come at a price for current operating systems. A team at MIT found that as they approached 48 cores their operating system slowed down. After activating more and more cores in their simulation, a sort of memory leak occurred whereby data had to remain in memory as long as a core might need it in its calculations. But the good news is that in their paper (PDF), they showed that for at least several years Linux should be able to keep up with chip enhancements in the multicore realm. To handle multiple cores, Linux keeps a counter of which cores are working on the data. As a core starts to work on a piece of data, Linux increments the number. When the core is done, Linux decrements the number. As the core count approached 48, the amount of actual work decreased and Linux spent more time managing counters. But the team found that 'Slightly rewriting the Linux code so that each core kept a local count, which was only occasionally synchronized with those of the other cores, greatly improved the system's overall performance.' The researchers caution that as the number of cores skyrockets, operating systems will have to be completely redesigned to handle managing these cores and SMP. After reviewing the paper, one researcher is confident Linux will remain viable for five to eight years without need for a major redesign."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:C-sharp (Score 3, Funny) 565

by fuzzix (#33108974) Attached to: How Can an Old-School Coder Regain His Chops?

I would recommend starting with C#, also. One big advantage is the excellent and free IDE available from Microsoft (C# Express). There are also some excellent books available, such as Programming Microsoft Windows with C#, by Petzold. Also, C# is similar in syntax and structure to Java and C++, so you can more easily transition to these languages, if needed.

Haven't tried C# express but I did use SharpDevelop in a previous gig when doing a little windows dev - it struck me as very polished.

I ended up doing what I needed with Win32 API calls and building with wxDev-C++ but I don't like talking about it... (Because of Winsock2 rather than wxDev-C++.

Troll, eh? Is that because winsock2 is actually good or because I didn't close the bracket?

Comment: Re:C-sharp (Score 2, Interesting) 565

by fuzzix (#33105460) Attached to: How Can an Old-School Coder Regain His Chops?

I would recommend starting with C#, also. One big advantage is the excellent and free IDE available from Microsoft (C# Express). There are also some excellent books available, such as Programming Microsoft Windows with C#, by Petzold. Also, C# is similar in syntax and structure to Java and C++, so you can more easily transition to these languages, if needed.

Haven't tried C# express but I did use SharpDevelop in a previous gig when doing a little windows dev - it struck me as very polished.

I ended up doing what I needed with Win32 API calls and building with wxDev-C++ but I don't like talking about it... (Because of Winsock2 rather than wxDev-C++.

Comment: Re:FORTRAN, COBOL etc. (Score 5, Interesting) 565

by fuzzix (#33105354) Attached to: How Can an Old-School Coder Regain His Chops?

Why update at all? There are still legacy systems using FORTRAN and probably COBOL as well. While there are C#, Java, PHP developers all over the place I imagine that finding a developer to maintain a legacy system is extremely hard. Of course that means there will not be many jobs out there for you but the pool of qualified applicants will be extremely small.

Plenty of money in COBOL but there is a need to suit up (physically and mentally) - not for everyone.

I have found a small but significant niche in embedded *nix programming. Small yet powerful systems requiring every scintilla of juice tempered with a familiar API - C Systems programming work is common enough (yet not common enough!). This is where I hope to spend the next while.

An "old school" approach to knowing the architecture inside-out and attention to detail is clouded by the bizarre abstractions of C# and Java. PHP isn't even an abstraction, it's a distraction (I grew tired of the inconsistency so no longer practise).

Perl is unfashionable in some circles and has a reputation for having magic constants (or whatever it is the detractors call "I don't want to learn this language") but I recommend it if you want dynamically typed "chops".

I find these "chops" are overrated. I enjoy low-level thinking so don't need to bloat up with virtual machines[1] (the real ones work fine for me), OO[2] (I know how to pass a pointer to my data to a lib) or design patterns[3] ("ways to do things" - if you learn one way as "the way" you may be unlikely to think there may be a better way)

[1] I use virtual machines but it's perverse running the dozens of MB JVM (and waiting around for it) for a browser bound animation or trivial desktop app. There may be a better case for this messing on the application server, but I don't care.

[2] OK, I will make an argument for OO in GUI programming - a large and complex library of heterogeneous components is difficult to arrange sensibly in a procedural manner. gtk_status_icon_set_from_file(foo_icon, "bar.png") or fooIcon.fileSet("bar.png")? There may be a similar argument to be made for other systems but for the most part I find the OO model a needless abstraction.

[3] Right... most programmers aren't brilliant - I know I'm fucking terrible for the most part - so having established methods for common situations is no bad thing... just don't get too attached.

Comment: Re:And this is news? (Score 1) 270

by fuzzix (#33054250) Attached to: Java IO Faster Than NIO

Excuse me, COBOL itself is still the COBOL of the 21st century, as it still makes banking, airlines and quite a lot of brick and mortar industrial companies keep on rolling. Maybe average slashdotters are out of this reality, but it is still alive and kicking. Please don't blame me, I've never programmed a line of COBOL in my whole live.

I have... and I'm not even that old.

I once worked writing COBOL for VMS and Mainframe systems in various government departments. It's the job that inspired me to go get a degree.

Dennis Ritchie is twice as bright as Steve Jobs, and only half wrong. -- Jim Gettys

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