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Comment: Defamation of character, anyone? (Score 2) 258

How can this tactic not qualify as defamation? With the huge number of screwed up lawsuits over bittorrent piracy going on, it would only be a short while before they "outed" the wrong person...and then they would be liable. What then? They apologize and hope that they don't get sued? Screw that. They start this mess, they mess with the wrong person, the first thing would be "lawyer up!" and counter file against them--and make them eat their words.

Comment: yeah....right (Score 1) 514

by fudgefactor7 (#42693039) Attached to: Lego Accused of Racism With Star Wars Set
You know, I'd take the claim a hell of a lot more seriously if they hadn't waited so damn long since the first appearance of the character in Episode VI. This whole thing just smacks of BS to me. I don't recall any other "asian" group complaining about Jabba. No, this is all about "appease us or we'll throw a fit!"

+ - Ask Slashdot: DVD VOB files larger than 1GB... Anyone else seeing this?

Submitted by fudgefactor7
fudgefactor7 (581449) writes "Recently, I've seen this on three new DVDs. In each case, the actual movie itself (not the extras) is the only one where this occurs: the VOB files of the movie are each 1.1GB in size, which violates the industry standard for VOB file specifications. Has anyone else seen this? The movies to-date that I've noticed this on are: The anniversary edition of "Raiders of the Lost Ark," "Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter," and latest "Prometheus.""

Comment: FLSA? (Score 1) 848

by fudgefactor7 (#38513766) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Handing Over Personal Work Without Compensation?
You need to tell the bosses that because you just saved the company mucho moolah by doing this haphazardly, you deserve a raise; otherwise you no longer feel comfortable supporting the code since that's really not your job. Sure, it works *now*, but later you can't really expect. Who knows what bugs crept in when you weren't looking--after all, this is way above your pay grade. Also, look into being able to write off your personal time/equipment on your taxes, since that's where the development was taking place. Additionally, see if FLSA kicks in, since you pretty much volunteered time/effort to the company without compensation.

Comment: Is it just me, or... (Score 2) 94

by fudgefactor7 (#36046060) Attached to: id Software's <em>RAGE</em> To Ship With Mod Tools
...does this game just look like practically every other game out there? I'm not enthusiastic about it. The physics of the car just looked wrong to me. I don't know, maybe that was still some early stuff, but for me to want this they'll have to do more. Lots more. And it's still a damn FPS. Enough already! The market is flooded with them, and none of them are any better than Doom 3 was. Ugh. Someone, please develop a new gaming paradigm so we can lose the FPS once and for all.
Facebook

Facebook To Make Facebook Credits Mandatory For Games 116

Posted by Soulskill
from the hope-that's-ok-with-you dept.
An anonymous reader sends this excerpt from TechCrunch: "Facebook has confirmed that it is indeed making Facebook Credits mandatory for Games, with the rule going into effect on July 1 2011. Facebook says that Credits will be the exclusive way for users to get their 'real money' into a game, but developers are still allowed to keep their own in-game currencies (FarmBucks, FishPoints, whatever). For example, Zynga can charge you 90 Facebook Credits for 75 CityCash in CityVille. ... The company acknowledges that some developers may not be pleased with the news, explaining this is why it is announcing the news five months in advance, so it can 'have an open conversation with developers.' The rule only applies to Canvas games (games that use Facebook Connect aren't affected), and while it's games only at this part, Facebook says that it eventually would like to see all apps using Facebook Credits. It's a move that's been a long time coming — there has been speculation that Facebook would do this for a year now, spurring plenty of angst in the developer community."
The Internet

Two-Thirds of US Internet Users Lack Fast Broadband 402

Posted by Soulskill
from the it's-comcastic dept.
jbrodkin writes "Two-thirds of US Internet connections are slower than 5 Mbps, putting the United States well behind speed leaders like South Korea, where penetration of so-called 'high broadband connectivity' is double the rate experienced in the United States. The United States places ninth in the world in access to high broadband connectivity, at 34% of users, including 27% of connections reaching 5 Mbps to 10 Mbps and 7% reaching above 10 Mbps, Akamai says in its latest State of the Internet Report. That's an improvement since a year ago, when the United States was in 12th place with only 24% of users accessing fast connections. But the United States is still dwarfed by South Korea, where 72% of Internet connections are greater than 5 Mbps, and Japan, which is at 60%. The numbers illustrate the gap between expectation and reality for US broadband users, which has fueled the creation of a government initiative to improve access. The US government broadband initiative says 100 million Americans lack any broadband access, and that faster Internet access is needed in the medical industry, schools, energy grid and public safety networks."
Government

UK Authorities Accused of Inciting Illegal Protest 371

Posted by samzenpus
from the stirring-the-pot dept.
jarran writes "Questions are being asked about the tactics being employed by UK authorities to monitor and control protest groups. Schnews reports on evidence that government IP addresses are posting messages to sites like indymedia, attempting to provoke activists into taking illegal direct action. Evidence has emerged recently that the police consider sex to be a legitimate tool for extracting information from targets, and senior police have been accused of lying to parliament about the deployment of undercover agents at protests."
Security

New Mega-Leak Reveals Middle East Peace Process 760

Posted by samzenpus
from the like-a-sieve dept.
An anonymous reader writes "There's been yet another mega-leak, this time of 1,600 papers describing the Israeli/Palestinian peace process negotiations. It's independent of Wikileaks and came to light via al-Jazeera, showing perhaps that the mega-leak meme is here to stay whatever happens to Assange. The papers show a weak Palestinian side offering ever greater concessions to Israel, which flatly rejected this as being insufficient: 'We do not like this suggestion because it does not meet our demands,' Israel's then foreign minister, Tzipi Livni, told the Palestinians, 'and probably it was not easy for you to think about it, but I really appreciate it.'"
America Online

60% of AOL's Profits Come From Misinformed Customers 301

Posted by samzenpus
from the check-your-math-again dept.
satuon writes "Ken Auletta's big New Yorker piece on AOL (subscription only) this week revealed an interesting detail about the company's inner workings. According to Auletta, 80% of AOL's profits come from subscribers, and 75% of those subscribers are paying for something they don't actually need. According to Auletta: "The company still gets eighty percent of its profits from subscribers, many of whom are older people who have cable or DSL service but don't realize that they need not pay an additional twenty-five dollars a month to get online and check their e-mail. 'The dirty little secret,' a former AOL executive says, 'is that seventy-five percent of the people who subscribe to AOL's dial-up service don't need it.'"

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