Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - Think Tanks: How a Bill [Gates Agenda] Becomes a Law

Submitted by theodp
theodp writes: The NY Times' Eric Lipton was just awarded a 2015 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting that shed light on how foreign powers buy influence at think tanks. So, it probably bears mentioning that Microsoft's 'two-pronged' National Talent Strategy to increase K-12 CS education and the number of H-1B visas — which is on the verge of being codified into laws by the President and lawmakers — was hatched at an influential Microsoft and Gates Foundation-backed think tank mentioned in Lipton's reporting, the Brookings Institution. In 2012, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted a forum on STEM education and immigration reforms, where fabricating a crisis was discussed as a strategy to succeed with Microsoft's agenda where earlier lobbying attempts by Bill Gates and Microsoft had failed. "So, Brad [Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith]," asked the Brookings Institution's Darrell West at the event, "you're the only [one] who mentioned this topic of making the problem bigger. So, we galvanize action by really producing a crisis, I take it?" "Yeah," Smith replied (video). And, with the help of nonprofit organizations like Code.org and FWD.us that were founded shortly thereafter, a national K-12 CS and tech immigration crisis was indeed created. Last December, as Microsoft-backed Code.org 'taught President Obama to code' at a White House event to kick off the nations's Hour of Code (as a top Microsoft lobbyist looked on), Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella was also in D.C. publicly lobbying for high-skilled immigration and privately meeting with White House officials on undisclosed matters. And that, kids, is How a Bill [Gates Agenda] Becomes a Law!

Comment: Re:A first step (Score 1) 261

by catchblue22 (#49551575) Attached to: Tesla To Announce Battery-Based Energy Storage For Homes

Since Pacific Gas and Electric is actually subsidizing the batteries in the pilot program, which is for solar users, it would seem to demonstrate that the power companies aren't lying when they say grid feed-in is a problem.

I'm talking about states like Arizona, which has enacted a $50/month fee if you want to feed solar electricity back into the grid. If you install a solar panel and a battery system that has absolutely no interaction with the grid, you can they justify charging a fee for your system. They might as well charge you for installing high efficiency appliances, bulbs, or for simply using less energy.

Comment: Re:A first step (Score 1) 261

by catchblue22 (#49550575) Attached to: Tesla To Announce Battery-Based Energy Storage For Homes

Actually, I think one of the biggest results of this will be to allow homes with solar energy to store ALL the energy they capture with their panels, instead of feeding that energy back into the grid. This will effectively neuter the arguments of power companies who say that grid feed-in is making the grid unstable, thus reducing the impetus for putting punitive fees on houses with solar panels.

Comment: Re: So let me get this straight (Score 1) 676

by Immerman (#49546645) Attached to: Except For Millennials, Most Americans Dislike Snowden

Go in, take your ballot, and simply decline to vote for any sock-puppets from the big two. If that means you turn in a blank or mostly-blank ballot, so be it. THEN you're sending the message that you DO care enough to vote, just not for either of the available candidates.

As a side benefit, there may well be state amendments, etc. on the ballot as well - and voting for/against on those can actually matter directly.

And who knows - if you're going to be voting anyway, maybe there's one or two offices where there's a decent candidate available - sometimes they manage to sneak into even the big two. Hell, an Elizabeth Warren / Bernie Sanders ticket would be promising enough to get me to not only vote for them, but go canvasing.

Comment: Re: This is not good... (Score 1) 254

by Immerman (#49545971) Attached to: Wellness App Author Lied About Cancer Diagnosis

However, (almost) all is the default assumption.

Oranges prevent scurvy - eat enough oranges, you won't develop scurvy.
Condoms help prevent pregnancy - use them regularly and properly, and you greatly reduce (from 80% to around 15%/year), the chances of pregnancy.
Meanwhile The Pill straddles the edge - while not 100% effective, the fraction of a percent of risk remaining is low enough that it's commonly referred to as preventing pregnancy.

Comment: Re:So let me get this straight (Score 1) 676

by Immerman (#49545905) Attached to: Except For Millennials, Most Americans Dislike Snowden

So don't vote for one of the big "two" - there's usually other candidates on the ballot as well. At worst you send the message that "I'm so sick of the big two that I'll throw my vote away on this wacko". Hopefully there's even a 3rd-party candidate you can agree with - if enough people vote for them then we can even influence the big two a little as they try to capture the "defectors".

Anything's better than sending the message "I'm too lazy to vote, do whatever the hell you want."

Comment: "It's a Wonderful Life" was in the public domain (Score 4, Informative) 297

Frank Capra's classic "It's a Wonderful Life" was largely forgotten in its time. In 1974, possibly due to an error, its copyright lapsed. TV networks, eager for low cost holiday fare, basically had this film running on a loop during certain times of the year. Then, Paramount managed to pull the movie back into copyright. And low and behold, the showings of this great movie slowed to a trickle once again. Public interest indeed. These media industry slime-balls are evil. Literally evil.

Comment: Re: This is not good... (Score 1) 254

by Immerman (#49536719) Attached to: Wellness App Author Lied About Cancer Diagnosis

If doing X will prevent Y, then if I do X, Y will not occur.

Eating healthily may prevent many individual tumors from forming, but it does not prevent ALL of them, so it can't be said to prevent cancer. It may HELP prevent cancer, much like condoms help prevent pregnancy, but that's a much weaker claim.

Comment: Re:More things in space (Score 0) 154

by Immerman (#49536263) Attached to: Hubble Spots Star Explosion Astronomers Can't Explain

Hey, they're right. Where do you think all the "Humans aren't causing Global Warming" "science" comes from. Sure it's atrocious science, but as long as someone with a Ph.D. and a lab coat is telling people what they want to here, plenty won't look too to see if they're actually scientists or just sciency PR flaks.

Comment: Re:Progressive Fix 101 (Score 1) 616

by mellon (#49533393) Attached to: Cheap Gas Fuels Switch From Electric Cars To SUVs

This is because, speaking as a Vermonter, I see so many SUVs coming up with New York City plates and no mud, and then heading south again on Sunday with the same New York City plates and the same no mud. Of course there are people for whom full-time SUV ownership is a requirement, but a lot of people just do it because why not?

Comment: Re:Progressive Fix 101 (Score 2) 616

by mellon (#49529457) Attached to: Cheap Gas Fuels Switch From Electric Cars To SUVs

In my experience the main difference between a minivan and an SUV is that the minivan has more room for stuff, on the positive side, and a less rugged chassis (which is sometimes a negative). If I had to choose between the two, I'd pick the minivan because you can haul plywood in it, which you can't do in a typical SUV.

"Stupidity, like virtue, is its own reward" -- William E. Davidsen

Working...