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Google Releases Street View Images From Fukushima Ghost Town 63

mdsolar writes in with news that Goolge has released Street View pictures from inside the zone that was evacuated after the Fukushima disaster. "Google Inc. (GOOG) today released images taken by its Street View service from the town of Namie, Japan, inside the zone that was evacuated after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011. Google, operator of the world's biggest Web search engine, entered Namie this month at the invitation of the town's mayor, Tamotsu Baba, and produced the 360-degree imagery for the Google Maps and Google Earth services, it said in an e-mailed statement. All of Namie's 21,000 residents were forced to flee after the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant, about 8 kilometers (5 miles) from the town, causing the world's worst nuclear accident after Chernobyl. Baba asked Mountain View, California-based Google to map the town to create a permanent record of its state two years after the evacuation, he said in a Google blog post."

Festo's Drone Dragonfly Takes To the Air 45

yyzmcleod writes "Building on the work of last year's bionic creation, the Smart Bird, Festo announced that it will literally launch its latest creation, the BionicOpter, at Hannover Messe in April. With a wingspan of 63 cm and weighing in at 175 grams, the robotic dragonfly mimics all forms of flight as its natural counterpart, including hover, glide and maneuvering in all directions. This is made possible, the company says, by the BionicOpter's ability to move each of its four wings independently, as well as control their amplitude, frequency and angle of attack. Including its actuated head and body, the robot exhibits 13 degrees of freedom, which allows it to rapidly accelerate, decelerate, turn and fly backwards."
The Internet

Submission + - EU Parliament Debates their own DMCA 2

bs0d3 writes: Right now, what is lacking across Europe, is a standard law to handle notice-and-take down's of illegal sites like the US' DMCA. Right now illegal content across Europe is subject to non-standard take down letters, some of which include no mention of what was allegedly infringed, nor in which jurisdiction in Europe it's infringed, or who to contact in your jurisdiction to challenge the claim, or even which company it is that is being represented by the law firm that gets in touch with he project. They need a system so that the notices would have to include information that makes them verifiable as correct. EU is holding a public consultation discussing notice-and-take down laws, which can be found here.

Submission + - Small rocky exoplanet discovered close to Sol system (

sander writes: Spitzer Space Telescope has discovered of a 0.67 earth mass sized planet 33 light years away from the Sol system by the Spitzer Space Telescope- and the article speculates that Spitzer might be able to spot planets as small as Mars in future. The planet may be out of the habitable zone, but close to Earth rocky exoplanet discoveries are always exciting.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Stepping down from an office server to NAS-only

rawket.scientist writes: I'm a full time lawyer and part time nerd doing most of the IT support for my small (~10 person) firm. We make heavy use of our old Windows Server 2003 machine for networked storage, and we use it as a DNS server (by choice, not necessity), but we don't use it for our e-mail, web hosting, productivity or software licensing. No Sharepoint, no Exchange, etc. Now old faithful is giving signs of giving out, and I'm seriously considering replacing it with a NAS device like the Synology DS1512+ or Dell PowerVault NX200. Am I penny-wise but pound foolish here? And is it overambitious for someone who's only dabbled in networking 101 to think of setting up a satisfactory, secure VPN or FTP server on one of these? We've had outside consultants and support in the past, but I always get the first "why is it doing this" call, and I like to have the answer, especially if I was the one who recommended the hardware.

Submission + - Mozilla Outs Desktop version of Firefox OS (

hypnosec writes: Mozilla has released a desktop version of its Firefox OS allowing developers to have a sneak peak the OS before it is officially made available on phones. Mozilla has ensured that it gets the highest audience for the Firefox OS and for that it has released the builds for all three major desktop operating systems: Mac, Windows, and Linux. Mozilla's Tony Chung wrote in a blog post, "If you're a web developer, you can use these builds to create and test your webApp against." Gaia/Hacking has the setup instructions. You would need a Gaia profile to launch the build otherwise you might encounter a black screen. Further information is available in Chung's blog post.

Submission + - Google has Built the Largest URL Database for Pirated Content (

SmartAboutThings writes: "Google’s black-list database, which by the way, also gives users that are not so tech-savvy access to millions of direct links containing even movies or images of games. Although Google indexes vast percentages of the whole web, now it isn't that hard for someone to find a way of downloading pirated music and other samples of this kind""

Submission + - Europe Gets Pay-As-You-Go Satellite Broadband (

judgecorp writes: "Europe is set to get pay-as-you-go high speed satellite broadband from Avanti's Ka-band HYLAS1 satellite in the 26.5 — 40GHz range. Avanti says satellite broadband services have improved massively including a far better uplink than used to be available, though the round-trip latency can't be improved much."

Submission + - Elder Scrolls MMO to be revealed soon by Bethesda (

techfun89 writes: Move over Knights of the Old Republic, we may have a new player in town. For some time its been rumored that an Elder Scrolls MMO will be coming, with news of it soon, possibly in May. Sources claim that Bethesda is working on the MMO project and this project will be a big feature of E3 this June.

The Elder Scrolls MMO will apparently take place hundreds of years, if not 1000 years, before Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim.


Submission + - Secret Service takes out "astonishing" cyber theft ring (

coondoggie writes: "The U.S. Secret Service, teamed with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to arrest 19 people the agencies said operated a cyber crime ring that specialized in identity theft and counterfeit credit card trafficking. According to the Secret Service the group operated on multiple cyber platforms and members bought and sold stolen personal and financial information through online forums, particularly"

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What are your top work-from-home tips? 2

ichard writes: "In a couple of months I'm going to start working from home full-time. I've been thinking about the obvious things like workspace ergonomics, but I'm sure there are more subtle considerations involved in a zero-minute commute. What are other Slashdot readers' experiences and recommendations for working from home?"

Submission + - 8200+ Strong, Researchers Demand Journals To Open Access (

kkleiner writes: "Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it freewell, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier’s backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act (RWA). Though lesser known than the other high-profile, privacy-related bills SOPA and PIPA, the act was slated to reverse the Open Access Policy enacted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008 that granted the public free access to any article derived from NIH-funded research."

Submission + - Free Apps Eat Your Smartphone Battery ( 1

judgecorp writes: "Here's a reason to pay for smartphone apps. The free versions can spend three times as much energy finding and serving ads as they do on their actual job. Research from a Purdue university scientist found that as much as 75 percent of the energy used by free apps goes on accessing location services, finding suitable adverts and displaying them."

Submission + - A Look at One of Activisions Retired World of Warcraft Servers (

MojoKid writes: "At last count, Activision Blizzard pegged the number of subscribers at 10.2 million. WoW subscribers in all corners of the globe, and it takes a massive amount of gear to host all the different game worlds, or realms, as they're referred to. Each realm is hosted on its own server, and in late 2011, Activision Blizzard began auctioning off retired server blades from the days of yore to benefit the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. This was a chance to own a piece of gaming history. Activision Blizzard sold around 2,000 retired Hewlett-Packard p-Class server blades on eBay and donated 100 percent of the proceeds (minus auction expenses) to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, which seeks to advance the treatment and prevention of catastrophic diseases in children."

Submission + - Fracking Is Also Poisoning the Air (

pigrabbitbear writes: "Quick refresher: hydraulic fracking is the practice of injecting water at extremely high pressure miles deep underground to release natural gas for harvesting and selling. To you, perhaps. It’s currently banned in many localities and even whole countries (France, Bulgaria), pending more information on its environmental and health effects. Well, here’s more new information: air emissions near fracking sites likely have impacts on both short-term and chronic health."

Adding features does not necessarily increase functionality -- it just makes the manuals thicker.