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Comment: Re:It's now assured destruction. (Score 1) 341

by fredprado (#47971669) Attached to: US Revamping Its Nuclear Arsenal
In this case it should be and most likely will be treated with other means than a massive second strike, because there isn't even a target for it. This threat must be dealt in different ways. The second strike capabilities are the deterrence against nuclear powers, not against sole bombs that terrorist groups may be able to procure somehow, and the need for this deterrence will keep existing regardless of the presence or absence of terrorists.

Comment: MAD is still the best alternative (Score 0) 341

by fredprado (#47971647) Attached to: US Revamping Its Nuclear Arsenal
Yes, mutually assured destruction has its shortcomings and limitations, but it is still the only possible way to prevent nuclear wars in a world where this technology has been developed. Any other idea of equilibrium based on good will and niceness is even more far fetched and delusional than the idea of a permanent MAD equilibrium.

Comment: Re:First.... (Score 1) 183

by fredprado (#47645325) Attached to: WHO Declares Ebola Outbreak An International Emergency
Nice theory, unfortunately it is completely removed from reality. Your nice ideas of cooperation and civilization only apply when resources are plentiful and the social structure is in place. In extreme situations where food is scarce and the social structure has collapsed only the strongest survive, and those are likely to be those that are most aggressive, well armed and trained for combat. A single person well armed and well trained can slaughter a whole lot of people. A well trained and coordinated group can slaughter thousands and take everything they want from them.

Comment: Re:Your Results Will Vary (Score 1) 241

by fredprado (#47496279) Attached to: Math, Programming, and Language Learning
When an Accounting or Biochemistry related subject needs programming is because it needs Mathematics. Programming IS Mathematics. Basic programming is basic Logic, basic Arithmetic and basic Algebra, which are all fields of Mathematics. You don't need formal training to do it, you may use it intuitively, but that is what you do. And the more complex what you are trying to model with your program is the more Math you will need.

Comment: Re:Your Results Will Vary (Score 5, Interesting) 241

by fredprado (#47486439) Attached to: Math, Programming, and Language Learning
It highly depends on what you do. If you work mostly with the common database applications, basic math is enough for you and it is unlikely that you will ever need anything above Calculus or even Calculus.

On the other hand, if you work with RF you will most likely need a lot of math. If you work with high level optimization algorithms you will need Abstract Algebra. If you work with Geolocation you will need a fair amount of high level Geometry, specially Non Euclidean ones.

So in the end the answer is: Higher Math is not necessary in all fields of programming but it is certainly very necessary in many.

Comment: Re:When Banks Were Able to Print Their Own Money (Score 1) 135

by fredprado (#47425055) Attached to: Judge Shoots Down "Bitcoin Isn't Money" Argument In Silk Road Trial

f course, as 19th-century observers frequently noted, a poorly capitalized bank that printed notes it couldn't redeem was, in the end, little different from a counterfeiting operation.

As is any government that prints too much money and causes inflation.

Comment: Re:Well, duh... (Score 1) 210

And most of the buts and trade-offs, if not all, are arguably unnecessary and exist solely to give control to bureaucracies over individuals. Other are not in opposition to the rights themselves. Libel laws, for example are not necessarily an exception to free speech, unless they demand the take over of the offending information. Civil consequences for the damage you make by lying are in perfect harmony with total and unrestricted free speech.

Rights as long as they are included in the law should be as unconditional as possible, always, and the difficulty of doing that is just another motive why rights should never exist in the law. The law should be negative only and anything it doesn't deny should be an inviolable individual right.

Comment: Re:Well, duh... (Score 1) 210

It does not need to be a Human Right. Even because the Human Rights Chart makes all countries in the world offenders if taken seriously. What I mean is that as long something is defined as an individual right by any legal chart applicable, it should be absolute as long as the law exists, not dependent upon the whim of the majority, a bureaucracy or whatever.

What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away.

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