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Comment: I call BS.. (Score 2) 121

by fred911 (#49313983) Attached to: FTC's Internal Memo On Google Teaches Companies a Terrible Lesson

None of the linked articles state any charge of breaking the law. Looks like regulators have done an in-depth investigation and found no evidence and have used the media to cover their ass. All we see are accusations that their shopping search engine used to (or may had have) rank results that they participated in higher, and they had captive agreements with business partners. But where are the specific charges and evidence?

  The links states " Google was acting in anti-competitive ways". Leads one to believe that that is not the current situation. With new technology (wonder why we have such long beta services) errors will be made, it's the companies responsibility to create the highest RIO it can. Specifically speaking, if I run a shopping service wouldn't I want to present the most profitable product first? If I am not participating how will I assure future survival and with a publicly traded company, how does this protect the investor?

  I don't buy excuse that they are too scared to litigate or prosecute a violation of law. If it's true, the regulatory agency needs to be replaced, isn't their primary function to uphold the law?

  Recent media coverage seems like, "Hey boss we took the whole fleet fishing for the past few months, spent a bunch of money and came back with an empty hull". The recent media coverage seems like smear to me.

Comment: Not new (Score 1) 83

Seeing how the the article is so dense with real content and references, what makes this different from CIH http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIH_computer_virus ?

  This infection was sometimes a real bitch to fix as you had to hunt for the exact bios for the device (which wasn't an easy task), remove the eeprom and flash it. An real PITA and one that Joe Sixpack couldn't fix. A real nasty infection.

Comment: Re:Refused to be drawn on specific details (Score 1) 105

by fred911 (#49308967) Attached to: Virgin Could Take On Tesla With Electric Car

" Hell, that one-off front-engine model is better liked than the 914."

  I'd have to disagree. The 914 was a heck of a lot more fun than a 924, 944 or a 928. It sat low, felt like it was glued to the road and still gave ya the boxer, oil-cooled feel. It was a bit scary to drive at the edge due to the fact of the mid-engine. If you start to lose it, it's a 50/50 shot whether brake or throttle input will bring it back. Aside from that, who wants their Porsche to pump water?

Comment: Re:Meanwhile, a million people ... (Score 2) 90

by fred911 (#49299295) Attached to: Amazon Wins US Regulators' Approval To Test-fly Drone

". Hobby landscape photographers (who happen to be hanging their camera from a hexacopter) are not on the FAA shitlist."

  The guy that received the cease-and-desist from the FAA for posting his drone videos on youtube would probably disagree. Sure he receives income from views but it's not the primary motivation for flying.

http://motherboard.vice.com/re...

Comment: Re:Paranoid, but mostly appropriate (Score 2) 90

by fred911 (#49299253) Attached to: Amazon Wins US Regulators' Approval To Test-fly Drone

" it's a lot easier this way to relax the 400' rule, "

  Here' another perfect example of the FAA over stepping their authority. In uncontrolled airspace anything below 1200 AGL is class G airspace where basically anything goes. It's perfectly legal to fly a remote controlled vehicle
without any permissions or license up to that level.

  The FAA suggested 400' there's no rule.

Comment: Re:I for one (Score 2) 1089

by fred911 (#49295945) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

"Am much much more tired of the congress and all the idiot Republicans. Obama did a good job".

  Isn't it a main responsibility of POTUS to lead and manage the legislative branch?

"99 problems the US has and none of them are Obama"

  The jury's still out on that. His actions won't be measurable for at lest 8 years and we won't see exact results for at least 4 more.

  That said, at the minimum, his rubber stamping of extending the Patriot Act perfectly demonstrates how his actions differ from his campaign platform and his ability or need to stand up for the people that elected him.

  My guess is history will just see him as a "flash in the pan", using suggestions and band-aids to satiate whoever, but lacking a backbone to stand and do what's right.

Comment: Re:America, the Police State. (Score 1) 140

by fred911 (#49273539) Attached to: How Police Fight To Keep Use of Stingrays Secret

"Where is this "well regulated Militia"

They're in the woods in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Michigan when it's in season to kill Bambi. All totaled, more than 2 million. The worlds biggest Militia, cold, hung-over or drunk that has a minimal amount of "friendly kills".

http://www.freerepublic.com/fo...

Comment: A gaurentee for future earnings (Score 1) 79

by fred911 (#49273391) Attached to: Judicial Committee Approves FBI Plan To Expand Hacking Powers

For all involved. Defense attorneys, judges, the appellate division, enforcement departments, prosecutors all the way up to the Supreme Court. All in all, when it finally makes its way to the highest court how much will have been spent? $400 to $500 million will have been spent.

  Sad thing is, it only gets tested when the target has enough balls and income to make the prosecutors try the case.

  justice isn't free

"Text processing has made it possible to right-justify any idea, even one which cannot be justified on any other grounds." -- J. Finnegan, USC.

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