Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Is it open source yet? (Score 2) 108

Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox

They all have your data, they can do whatever the f... they want with it. Unless you're talking about a client backdoor to access all the other files you didn't want to share with the cloud, but I don't think any of the others are any better. If you want real control, it's ownCloud or no cloud I think...

Comment: Re:I didn't lie, I just gave false statement (Score 1) 85

by Kjella (#48208115) Attached to: Judge Says EA Battlefield 4 Execs Engaged In "Puffery," Not Fraud

Wow, the ability to come up with "he did it, but it' wasn't bad enough to warrant legal action" excuses has had a huge renaissance.

More like you accuse someone of defamation and it's the difference between "He told people I'm an asshole" and "He told people I'm a child molester". Both are defamatory statements by definition "1. (Law) injurious to someone's name or reputation)" but only one is actually illegal. Even if you're selling a polished turd you can make a lot a objectively highly questionable praise, misleading statistics and lies by omission without actually incriminating yourself. Like the defamation example above, you usually have to be caught in a factual lie in order to be convicted. Every sales pitch strategy I've been involved in involved pushing our strengths and concealing our weakness, if that was illegal we'd have to put all of marketing and sales in jail. And every person who went on a date ever. Meaning /. won't change much, I guess.

Comment: Re:Blah blah Elon call me when (Score 1) 88

by dpilot (#48205523) Attached to: What It Took For SpaceX To Become a Serious Space Company

By that definition, nobody has a serious space industry, not even the government players.

Actually I think I might almost agree with you, but that's not a ding against SpaceX, it's a ding against our species.

I don't agree about launching more habs that we can fill with people - I'd just like to see enough SOMETHING launched to make opportunities. I'd also like to see a second basket to keep some of our species eggs in.

Comment: Male/Female behavior rooted deeper than "culture." (Score 1) 730

by erroneus (#48203429) Attached to: NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

As much as I have looked into the general subject of why women don't "Y" and why men don't "X." People keep wanting to believe that it's "male domination" and completely forget about the functions of our bodies and how they drive and support our behaviors.

If it were a cultural issue, there would invariably be some example somewhere of an exchange of roles between men and women on earth SOMEWHERE. There really isn't.

At the core is essentially a way of devaluing ALL people (both male and female) by removing their significance and importance in any given role. This serves to further weaken families and other structures which invariably compete with other control structures like... uhm... government.

Comment: Re:android = windows (Score 1) 113

by erroneus (#48203255) Attached to: Delivering Malicious Android Apps Hidden In Image Files

Spoken like someone who didn't even read the summary -- and seriously, that's all you need in this case. It's standard trojan nonsense. You have to install an app which then sets about installing another app... secretly.

The whole point of this article, I think, is to make all platforms "equally bad." I smell microsoft or apple sponsorship. If you can't make what you have "better" you "compete" by trying to make others look worse.

Comment: Re: Gamergate is NOT about defining "gamer" (Score 1) 164

by squiggleslash (#48202999) Attached to: For Game Developers, It's About the Labor of Love
As a postscript, a journalist who did something similar to what I did, writes here about his experience. Again, if you (as seems increasingly unlikely) really are concerned about corruption in journalism, you should probably stop telling people who ask for examples to go off and do their own research.

Comment: Re:Wired Access Will Still Be Standard (Score 1) 96

by Kjella (#48202907) Attached to: Internet Broadband Through High-altitude Drones

Assuming the need is infinite, if your demands are satisfied you might turn to flexibility and convenience. Last quarter we here in Norway saw a tiny dip in fixed residential broadband for the first time ever, whether that's a fluke or not is uncertain but business lines have been on the decline for some time because small 1-5 man shops use 3G/LTE to check their mail rather than having a dedicated broadband line in the office. It's just an extension of that most "normal" people I run into use wireless now instead of wired networks because it's capped by their Internet speed anyway. And even if you gave them gigabit Internet, they'd probably still feel wireless was fast enough.

Comment: Re:What future? (Score 2) 125

by Kjella (#48199665) Attached to: The Future of Stamps

This. Actual stamps is mostly a consumer thing, I just checked our commercial postal service and they recommend a "stamping" machine if you send more than 40 letters/week where you charge it up like a prepaid cell phone, same thing for packages except there they normally print to labels they slap on the package. And for the big companies you get bulk pre-printed envelopes with logo that are collected at your place of business and charged to your corporate account, we have those at work. The potential for abuse is small since you can't drop them off at a regular mailbox and it'd be obvious who you're using to pay for your postage. A lot of the consumer-to-business mail is prepaid and rolled into the cost of business too, the few times I use stamps is to other people but most of that is replaced by email since you don't need a formal signature on anything. I guess there's the odd package, but if it's too big to fit a mail box you're going to the post office anyway.

Comment: Re:Systematic bias, but also something else (Score 1) 730

by squiggleslash (#48199015) Attached to: NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

I'm in the same boat as he is, and I know what he means.

It's not about denying access to ponies or princesses. It's about (1) not assuming an interest or lack of interest (relatively easy - my daughter seems just as fond of Cookie Monster and Thomas the Tank Engine as Abby and Madeline) and (2) not accidentally dropping the social cues that lead girls to see certain things as important in a way boys wouldn't.

It's very, very, hard, for example, for a dad not to tell my daughter how beautiful she is. But imagine, however, the effect it has on you if people around you, from the day you're born, talk about how pretty and beautiful you are. I never had that, because I'm male. My mother called me handsome from time to time, but it was never drilled into me that beauty was so important.

If she wants to consider it important, let her determine that herself.

Comment: Re:Can we stop trying to come up with a reason? (Score 1) 730

by squiggleslash (#48198935) Attached to: NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

FWIW my experience of women as part of development teams has been largely positive, with one exception (not the woman herself, though she was fairly fiesty which in this case didn't help - or maybe it protected her, I don't know, but her supervisor, who was an out and out misogynist. She eventually left, because the company we worked for at the time kinda sucked like that.) That is, respect amongst male programmers for female programmers seem to be completely in line with what you'd expect for males respecting males.

Now, that said, I can't speak as a female in the same situation, so while the degree of respect might have been entirely reasonable, other factors may creep in that, as a male, I'm unaware of.

All I can say is as the father of a 2yo girl myself, I'm desperately hoping she has whatever opportunities she wants when she grows up. I think we in software development is decent enough that it's a field I'd have no trouble recommending to her. But, obviously, in the end it all depends on the group you end up working for.

Comment: Re:Like everything else, it depends ... (Score 1) 14

by squiggleslash (#48198495) Attached to: On posting anonymously

It's a real shame that you have to add all the disclaimers, and highlights the problems that we need anonymity for.

Yeah, though in the end... I was in part trying to keep a cool head with the disclaimers, but after a few days of research I must admit to being sufficiently unimpressed by the GG crowd, having shown it for the last few days just trying to get some straight answers, that I doubt being anonymous actually makes any difference. Ultimately it's hard to hide the fact you're the one with those opinions, unless you never say anything.

Ms. Barbara Hudson, 1312 rue Hyman, # 301, ...

I think you have a number of things going for you:

1. You know where APK lives too.
2. You live in a completely different country. ;-)

I'm glad we're maybe closer in views about the reaction of many towards Twitter death threats.

Comment: Re: Gamergate is NOT about defining "gamer" (Score 1) 164

by squiggleslash (#48198379) Attached to: For Game Developers, It's About the Labor of Love

There was an article on Slashdot about something GamerGate did that was going against the very journalists you're claiming GamerGate is ignoring. Slashcode even helpfully linked to it as a related story. It's right there at the top. The only way you missed it is if you're willfully ignoring it, which of course you are.

Not on my version of the page, no. The only link GamerGate related in the related stories list at least as rendered here is the Intel/Gamasutra/"Gamers" are dead thing (which I assume you cannot possibly mean, as it doesn't involve unethical journalism.)

FWIW, I also did your job for you. "My job?" I pretend to hear you ask. Well, yes. You're an advocate for a movement, and so the onus is on you to push forward examples of what you're fighting against, something you're refusing to do on principle.

So I trawled through a bunch of GamerGate Twitter streams, including Nero's. I looked at the Reddit KotakuInAction subreddit, which appears to be an organizing grounds for GamerGate. I looked at the negative responses to people like thequinnconspiracy and followed the links they were claiming.

And during this time, I found... zero cases. Well, let me back up a moment: there was one, involving Gawker, that was obviously a case of unethical journalism, with a journalist, as a joke, taking on a pro-bullying-nerds position, and GG rallying the troops against them. But I'm not counting it basically because it was a response to GG. The Gawker idiot would never have made the joke if there wasn't some giant group he thought represented nerds running around being apparently nasty and evil.

But in terms of independent cases of journalistic corruption? As in EA offers to swamp SuperGamerMagazine.comnetorg with expensive ads in response to good reviews for The Sims 4? As in BioWare gives Slimy McSlimepants from AGN his own Asari sex doll in exchange for a great review of Mass Effect 7?

No. Not one example. Nothing.

What I did see was primarily articles about how terrible the meida was because they're lying about GamerGate. Not lying about video games, but GamerGate.

I also saw some fake conspiracies. Yep, fake. I mean so fake it should have been obvious to everyone commenting. Like an email "leaked" from The Guardian that the "leaker" claimed contained an attack on GamerGate. Except it didn't. It contained an attack on people using the #killallmen hashtag. It was right there in the subject line. The leaker hoped that people would take a sentence that occured after the attack on #killallmen users, saying that a prominent feminist would be in the office to discuss GamerGate the next day, as meaning that the attack was about GamerGate.

Add that to the attacks on Quinn for having intimate relations with a journalist... which turned out to also be a fake conspiracy because said journalist wrote nothing about her, absolutely nothing, after the relationship started.

Add to that the attacks on Gamasutra for writing an article attacking gamers... except it didn't, it attacked the industry for only writing games aimed at "gamers" (the quotes are important, and yes, they appeared in the article), that is, a demographic of white immature teenage males that no longer makes up even a plurality of gamers. Oh, and even if it had attacked gamers... corruption? Really?

Well anyway, I'm seeing a pattern here.

Does the pattern matter? Well, probably not. In the end, the Guardian, and Gamasutra, and Quinn issues were probably peripheral, a movement desperately trying to find a positive identity when it knows there's considerable darkness holding it together. Quinn was attacked, not the journalist she had a relationship with. The death of "Gamers" article was written by a self-avowed feminist but wasn't radically different from criticism published elsewhere. The attacks on another feminist for publishing videos reviewing games from a feminist analytical point of view. The attacks on a female game developer including doxxing, her account being hacked, and a full on campaign of slander, because she documented some of the sexism she was dealing with in the industry.

And... well, we add to that SJWs. I don't mean the people, I mean the insult. The fact that GamerGate's opponents - by GamerGate's choice - are not journalists, but those who promote equality and inclusiveness and who oppose mindless sexism.

I did your job. I went out to try to find out what you were about. I did this after giving you the opportunity countless times to give examples showing GamerGate's good side, but you kept telling me to go off and do it myself. So I did. I think, based upon GamerGate's own words, that the group is primarily anti-women. The journalism thing is a smokescreen, I think in part because the GGs themselves are uncomfortable with the movement being solely about harassing female developers and developers who think about gender issues, it needed some underlying moral purpose otherwise it's just a bunch of nerds bullying women.

I'd say maybe it was a mistake not to engage me with examples of GamerGate challenging actual corrupt journalism, but I'm thinking you never had any.

Pro-tip: if I got it wrong, if you're really about corrupt journalism, then next time someone comes to you and says "I keep hearing conflicting things about GamerGate. I hear you guys are saying it's about unethical journalism, do you have anything about that?", you give them an example. Do NOT, under any circumstances, tell them to go off and search the Internet. Because they will not agree with you after they do.

As for me and you? We're done. You just asked me to wade through one of the worst cesspools of misogynist hate I've encountered in a long time. Your response to this will probably go unread.

Comment: Re:Recognition (Score 1) 149

by Kjella (#48197261) Attached to: 'Microsoft Lumia' Will Replace the Nokia Brand

Nokia has more brand name recognition, so of course we won't use that.

Of the "let's frame it and put it on a wall" more than "I want one in my pocket" variety. I'll always have fond memories of Nokia 3210 and the state of the art in 1999, but it's not selling a new phone and it's not quite up to collectible/antique standards either. And Elop's little stunt sure didn't help Nokia's reputation as a has-been either. Not to mention that Nokia running Windows Phone might have some of the same hardware but there's very little in common between "old Nokia" and "new Nokia" anyway. I think this was a pretty easy call of Microsoft and would have happened regardless, if they'd ponied up a little more they could have gotten the Nokia name for good as it matters more to consumers than the commercial market the remains of Nokia serves.

Say "twenty-three-skiddoo" to logout.

Working...