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Submission + - Machine gun fire from military helicopters flying over downtown Miami ( 1

Okian Warrior writes: Multiple police agencies and the military are currently (Monday night) conducting training exercises over Miami and elsewhere in the county. The exercise includes military helicopters firing machine-gun blanks while flying over highways and buildings.

This YouTube video shows helicopters strafing highways with blank rounds near the Adrian Arts center.

There are reports of similar actions in Houston

From the Houston article: "if you see the helicopters or hear gunfire, it's only a drill."

Not to be alarmist or anything, but, um... WTF?

Submission + - UK defense contractor hacked, confidential documents leaked (

An anonymous reader writes: Britam, a UK defense contractor company was hacked and a collection of confidential documents were released. The documents include a passports, incident reports, contracts and also a very controversial e-mail in which Britam reveal an "approved by Washington" plan to stage a chemical weapons attack in Syria and blame the Assad regime for it.

Submission + - Scientists Unravel Mysteries to Spider Silk Strength Using Lasers

An anonymous reader writes: They may be creepy and crawly, but spiders produce some of the world's strongest material: silk. Weight for weight, spider silk is five times as strong as piano wire. Now, scientists at Arizona Statue University have announced that they have found a way to obtain a wide variety of elastic properties of the silk of several intact spiders' webs using a sophisticated laser light scattering technique.

Submission + - George P. Shultz: A Cold Warrior on a Warming Planet (

Lasrick writes: Great interview in this article at the Bulletin's subscription journal (this article is free). From the abstract: "In this interview, he talks about two missions: reducing nuclear weapons and reducing carbon emissions. Shultz defends the Reagan administration’s strategy for nuclear weapons reduction, including Reagan’s unwillingness to abandon the Strategic Defense Initiative...He recommends a revenue-neutral carbon tax for combating climate change, arguing that such a tax can level the energy playing field by forcing energy producers to bear a cost for polluting the air.

Submission + - Researchers find that some cancer apps aren't delivering reliable results (

beeudoublez writes: "Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center examined four apps that use photographs of skin lesions to make assessments and whether they suggest any type of diagnosis or estimate the risk of malignancy.
Testing their sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values, the researchers found that three of the four apps incorrectly classified 30 per cent or more of melanomas as unconcerning."


Submission + - Google Now Boasts World's No. 2 And No. 3 Social Networks (

redletterdave writes: "A new report released Monday revealed that Google+, less than a year and a half after its public debut, is now the No. 2 social network in the world with 343 million active users. Even better for Google, YouTube, which had not previously been tracked as a social network until recently, is now the No. 3 social network in the world with about 300 million active users. Google Plus and YouTube are being used by 25 percent and 21 percent of the global Internet populace, respectively."
Open Source

Submission + - Why a Linux user is using Windows 3.1 ( 1

colinneagle writes: About two weeks back, I was using my Android tablet and looking for a good graphics editor. I wanted something with layers and good text drawing tools. That’s when it hit me. We already have that.

Photoshop used to run on Windows 3.1. And Windows 3.1 runs great under both DOSBox and QEMU, both of which are Open Source emulators available for Android and every other platform under the sun.

So I promptly set to work digging up an old copy of Photoshop. The last version released for Windows 3.1 was back in 1996. And finding a working copy proved to be...challenging. Luckily, the good folks at Adobe dug around in their vaults and managed to get me up and running.

And, after a bit of tweaking, I ended up with an astoundingly functional copy of Photoshop that I can now run on absolutely every device I own. And the entire environment (fonts, working files and all) are automatically backed up to the cloud and synced between systems.

But what other applications (and, potentially, games) does this give me access to? How far can I take this?


Submission + - Does recreational computer use affect high school achievement? (

tokkov writes: Is playing videogames or “using a computer for fun” positive, negative or neutral on student achievement in high school? According to recent research published in the journal Educational Technology Research and Development, researchers at Columbia University found that students who “use a computer for fun, such as talking to friends or relatives, emailing, surfing the internet or listening to music” or played video games 1-2 hours per day had increased academic achievement in mathematics and reading up to grade 10 ( Between grade 10 and 12 there was no added benefit. Positive effect sizes were small but comparable to doing your homework or participating in extracurricular activities.

Submission + - Your Cloud Provider (Probably) Isn't Spying On You (

jfruh writes: "Last week the CEO ServiceNow made a minor splash by claiming that it was awfully easy for a cloud provider to spy on the data they stored for you or discriminate based on pricing. But while that's possible, in many cases it turns out to be simply not practical enough to be beneficial. Even moves like restoring outages for higher-paying customers first turn out to be more trouble than they're worth."

Submission + - SpaceX Plans Heavy Lift Vehicle for 2013 (

Anthony James writes: "For SpaceX, 2012 was the year of the Dragon. In 2013 the Falcon Heavy, SpaceX’s heavy lift vehicle, is set to steal some of the spotlight away from the Dragon.

The Falcon Heavy is currently in development and builds off of the Falcon 9 first stage and the Merlin 1D engine, an upgrade of the engine currently flying on the Falcon 9."


Submission + - GAO Finds US Military's Critical Technologies List Outdated, Useless (

chicksdaddy writes: "The U.S. Department of Defense has stopped updating its main reference list of vital defense technologies that are banned from export, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), The Security Ledger reports.

The Militarily Critical Technologies List (MCTL) is used to identify technologies that are critical to national defense and that require extra protection — including bans on exports and the application of anti-tamper technology.
GAO warned six years ago that the Departments of State and Commerce, which are supposed to use the list, found it too broad and outdated to be of much use. The latest report (GAO 13-157) finds that the situation has worsened: budget cuts forced the DOD to largely stop updating and grooming the list in 2011. Sections on emerging technologies are outdated, while other sections haven't been updated since 1999. Without the list to rely on, the DOD has turned to a hodgepodge of other lists, while officials in the Departments of State and Commerce who are responsible for making decisions about whether to allow a particular technology to be exported have turned to ad-hoc networks of subject experts. Other agencies are looking into developing their own MCTL equivalents, potentially wasting government resources duplicating work that has already been done, GAO found."


Submission + - Purported Relativity Paradox Resolved (

sciencehabit writes: A purported conflict between the century-old theory of classical electrodynamics and Einstein's theory of special relativity doesn't exist, a chorus of physicists says. Last April, an electrical engineer claimed that the equation that determines the force exerted on an electrically charged particle by electric and magnetic fields—the Lorentz force law—clashes with relativity, the theory that centers on how observers moving at a constant speed relative to one another will view the same events. To prove it, he concocted a simple "thought experiment" in which the Lorentz force law seemed to lead to a paradox. Now, four physicists independently say that they have resolved the paradox.

Every cloud has a silver lining; you should have sold it, and bought titanium.