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Comment: but that's just the flow of consciousness (Score 1) 408

by foszae (#36138076) Attached to: The Rise of Filter Bubbles
of course it does that. it's a cultural artifact which reflects the process it developed out of. that is the general way a brain works. as we search for things, our instinctive subconsciously-directed actions to find our comfort zone and stick to it. the problem they're describing with google is analogous to trying to tell someone a difficult truth. they prefer to first bend toward their comforting delusions, and it takes an amazing subtlety (or a conscientious argument) to influence a stupid person to hear all the right ideas in the right order so that they can personally infer a painful truth. the self-humiliating recognition of ignorance doesn't sit well with anyone's feelings. avoiding that end-result (which is pretty much last on the "want" list) is what drives people to define their relationship to the world. it's very gratifying to feel supported in a safe little bubble where you don't even have to pay attention to anything but your self-satisfaction. challenging your own preference for ego-boosting activities is what keeps people dumb already. how popular would google be if its algorithm responded to people trending to reinforcing disprovable belief by producing results filled with obvious, painful truth which contradicts the way people want to believe? goog's all like: i see you like religion still, let's sow some seeds of doubt in your search results mwah ha haha

Comment: follow a dead end, or do vital research? (Score 3, Insightful) 588

by foszae (#35643946) Attached to: 12-Year-Old Rewrites Einstein's Theory of Relativity
well, being a math prodigy is fine and all that. just, the thing is that it means he probably spends a lot of time with mathematicians. and if he's working on a refinement of special relativity, i hope for his sake that he doesn't get mired in the same thought processes which turned the field of physics into an quagmire forty years ago. yes, it's necessary to understand where we are to see where we're going, but frankly if you listen to a modern physicist, they are so utterly lost in the minutiae of particle decays that they're missing the right-in-their-face boots-on-the-ground reality. the last few decades of research have brought us practically nothing except the word "string". and even then it is inconsistently applied, poorly conceived of, and utterly obtuse to a layperson anyhow. sure kid, it's neat that someone proved the photon can be particle or wave purely on circumstance. but if you start obsessing over trying to make a followup experiment to prove some minor particle effect, you will end up just as gobsmacked by the new reality as the rest of the physics faculty.

Comment: Re:Claire Perry, way to admit to being a bad mothe (Score 1) 335

by foszae (#34340590) Attached to: British MP Calls For Pornography 'Opt-In'
Yes the fact that human sexuality involves human emotion and intimacy is worth bringing up. But i think you are being a little bit hopeful there. I don't think the average Joe Bloggs is going to sit and explain those parts terribly well even if they already are trying to explain the facts of life. If a child is already being socialized by parents who are warm and understanding, they're probably also learning most of the fundamental skills to achieve satisfying emotional intimacy with a future love anyhow. If they aren't, because the family home is maybe awkward or slightly dysfunctional, then sure it would be great if they had it pointed out to them by someone, but i'm pretty sure they would have to either learn how to do so by themselves, through personal growth, or perhaps be a bit of social failure. A big part of why young kids get something from porn is just to see the technical aspects, what goes where, what moves does one use, how can a woman have sex with a donkey? What you're suggesting, Tom, is a much more elementary set of social skills, which hopefully they've already picked up on before they're even actively interested in porn.
Role Playing (Games)

Fallout: New Vegas Coming This Fall, Trailer Released 100

Posted by Soulskill
from the out-is-still-falling dept.
Bethesda announced today that Fallout: New Vegas is scheduled for release sometime this fall, and they released a trailer as well. Details are scant yet on the official site, but they had this to say: "Experience all the sights and sounds of fabulous New Vegas, brought to you by Vault-Tec, America's First Choice in Post Nuclear Simulation. Explore the treacherous wastes of the Great Southwest from the safety and comfort of your very own vault: Meet new people, confront terrifying creatures, and arm yourself with the latest high-tech weaponry as you make a name for yourself on a thrilling new journey across the Mojave wasteland. A word of warning, however — while Vault-Tec engineers have prepared for every contingency,* in Vegas, fortunes can change in an instant. Enjoy your stay. (* Should not be construed as a legally-binding claim.)"
Space

Pluto — a Complex and Changing World 191

Posted by timothy
from the can-imagine-quite-a-bit dept.
astroengine writes "After 4 years of processing the highest resolution photographs the Hubble Space Telescope could muster, we now have the highest resolution view of Pluto's surface ever produced. Most excitingly, these new observations show an active world with seasonal changes altering the dwarf planet's surface. It turns out that this far-flung world has more in common with Earth than we would have ever imagined."
Microsoft

Microsoft Upgrades Vista Kernel in SP1 231

Posted by Zonk
from the new-toys-for-your-tech dept.
KrispySausage writes "One of the big features discussed in early speculation of Windows Vista SP1 was the kernel upgrade, which was supposed to bring the operating system into line with the Longhorn kernel used in Windows Server 2008. With Vista SP1 going RTM, there hasn't been so much as a peep from Microsoft about the mooted kernel update. Has it happened? Well the answer is yes it has. Presumably the main reason for Microsoft's silence on the subject is that as they're keen to promote the improvements and enhancements to Vista, rather than placing emphasis on a kernel upgrade, which some people might see as a risk of newly-introduced instability."
Biotech

Three Parents Contribute to Experimental Human Embryo 136

Posted by Zonk
from the welcome-to-transhuman-space dept.
gihan_ripper writes "It sounds like the storyline from a cheesy film, but a human embryo has been created using the genetic material from one man and two women. A team from Newcastle University, England, developed the technique in the hope that it could be used to prevent diseases caused by faulty mitochondria. Their experiment started with two ingredients: first, a left over (and 'severely abnormal') embryo from an IVF treatment; second, a donor egg from another woman. The donor egg has all but the mitochondrial DNA removed, then a nucleus from the embryo is inserted into the egg. Effectively, this results in a mitochondria transplant. 'While any baby born through this method would have genetic elements from three people, the nuclear DNA that influences appearance and other characteristics would not come from the woman providing the donor egg. However, the team only have permission to carry out the lab experiments and as yet this would not be allowed to be offered as a treatment.'"
Space

NASA Wants "People People" for Astronaut Core 86

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the hope-there-is-still-a-little-steel dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Astronauts are the ultimate Type A personalities but that can backfire during a long stay in space so NASA is taking applications for a new crop of astronauts whose main duties are to conduct experiments, keep the station running and stay in their crewmates' good graces. For that, NASA needs an affable, tolerant guy or gal who is more researcher than jet jockey. 'You need to be more of a people person' to serve on the station, says astronaut Michael Lopez-Alegria, who has flown on the space shuttle and commanded the station. 'You can't just be steely-eyed, no matter how competent.' Coping skills are crucial on a station mission, which lasts three to six months, compared with 11 to 15 days for a shuttle mission. 'Anybody can get along with anybody for a couple of weeks,' says psychiatry professor Nick Kanas who studies astronaut behavior. After a month or two, 'being with somebody for that long starts to wear on you. The jokes get stale. You have to learn new ways of interacting.'"
Slashdot.org

+ - Isaac Newton's papers calculating the apocalypse->

Submitted by
the terminal of geoff goodfellow
the terminal of geoff goodfellow writes "The Associated Press has a story out today on the three-century-old manuscripts by Isaac Newton calculating the exact date of the apocalypse, detailing the precise dimensions of the ancient temple in Jerusalem and interpreting passages of the Bible. The Newton Papers just went on display for the first time in public at the Jewish National and University Library in Israel and lay bare the little-known religious intensity of a man many consider history's greatest scientist. The fully digitized manuscripts and printed works can be viewed here, including the Apocalypse, that reached the conclusion that the world would end no earlier than 2060."
Link to Original Source
Slashdot.org

+ - Isaac Newton's papers calculating the apocalypse->

Submitted by the terminal of geoff goodfellow
the terminal of geoff goodfellow (43468) writes "The Associated Press has a story out today on the three-century-old manuscripts by Isaac Newton calculating the exact date of the apocalypse, detailing the precise dimensions of the ancient temple in Jerusalem and interpreting passages of the Bible. The Newton Papers just went on display for the first time in public at the Jewish National and University Library in Israel and lay bare the little-known religious intensity of a man many consider history's greatest scientist. The fully digitized manuscripts and printed works can be viewed here, including the Apocalypse, that reached the conclusion that the world would end no earlier than 2060."
Link to Original Source
Mandriva

+ - Mandriva CEO says no patent deal with Microsoft->

Submitted by
christian.einfeldt
christian.einfeldt writes "Mandriva CEO Francois Bancilhon has ruled out a Novell — Linspire — Xandros — type deal with Microsoft. In a 19 June 2007 post, Bancilhon minces no words in expressing his view of the merits of Microsoft's patent claims:

'We also believe what we see, and up to now, there has been absolutely no hard evidence from any of the FUD propagators that Linux and open source applications are in breach of any patents. So we think that, as in any democracy, people are innocent unless proven guilty and we can continue working in good faith. So we don't believe it is necessary for us to get protection from Microsoft to do our job or to pay protection money to anyone.'
Bancilhon says that this blog entry was posted to lay to rest any rumors that such a deal might be in the offing."

Link to Original Source

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