Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Last Chance - Get 15% off sitewide on Slashdot Deals with coupon code "BLACKFRIDAY" (some exclusions apply)". ×

Submission + - Coding tricks of game developers (

damian2k writes: Game developers often experience a horrific "crunch" (also known as a "death march"), which happens in the last few months of a project leading up to the game's release date. Failing to meet the deadline can often mean the project gets cancelled or even worse, you lose your job. So what sort of tricks do they use while they're under the pump, doing 12+ hour per day for weeks on end?

How about changing the background story of a game to suit a bug, or even just leaving the bug in there and making it a humorous feature of the game! There's also the game studio who keep a pair of white gloves handy, just in case you need to code up some particularly nasty hack and you don't want to feel dirty when you do it! Read more at the article here:

Submission + - Dutch largest ISP hacked, shuts down all 2M e-mailaccounts to contain damage (

An anonymous reader writes: Hackers that managed to gain access to servers of KPN, the largest ISP in the Netherlands, have provided proof of their actions by publishing a list of 500+ email accounts — including names, addresses and unhashed passwords — on As a precaution, KPN has temporarily disabled all email accounts of 2 million subscribers.

Submission + - Smart Camera Tells Tobacco from Marijuana (

An anonymous reader writes: A new smart camera technology not only takes a picture but also assays chemical composition, allowing photographers to tell whether that hand-rolled cigarette contains tobacco or marijuana. Designed to speed industrial inspection systems--such as detecting whether food is spoiled--the new smart camera includes spectral filters that make images of corn fields appear differently from hemp. Spectral cameras have been available for decades, but this microchip version should be cheap enough for almost any application--including law enforcement.

Some programming languages manage to absorb change, but withstand progress. -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982