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Submission + - To Pay Off Loans, Grads Put Off Marriage, Children 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The WSJ reports that with total US. student-loan debt topping $1 trillion, Moody's Investors Service says borrowers with private student loans are defaulting or falling behind on payments at twice prerecession rates handcuffing grads at all levels of the work force and having a sharp effect on people's lifestyles causing grads to delay marriage and the decision to have children. Most students get little help from colleges in choosing loans or calculating payments. Most pre-loan counseling for government loans is done online, and many students pay only fleeting attention to documents from private lenders. Many borrowers "are very confused, and don't have a good sense of what they've taken on," says Deanne Loonin. The implications last a lifetime. A recent survey by the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys says members are seeing a big increase in people whose student loans are forcing them to delay major purchases or starting families. "The federal student loan system has become predatory due to the Congressional removal of standard consumer protections and congressionally sanctioned collection powers that are stronger than those for all other loan instruments in our nation's history," says Alan Collinge, founder of, an advocacy group. When borrowers default, collection agencies can hound them for life, because unlike other kinds of debt, there is no statute of limitations on collections and while other kinds of debt can be discharged in bankruptcy, student loans must still be paid barring "undue hardship," a legal test that most courts have interpreted very narrowly. According to estimates by the White House Office of Management and Budget, the government is expected to collect roughly $111 on every $100 of defaulted direct loans and $122 on every $100 of defaulted guaranteed loans in 2011. "The Department of Education makes a lot of money off of defaulted loans," says Collinge when asked why the department masks the true default-rate picture."

Submission + - Paid Developers Power the Linux Kernel

Hugh Pickens writes: "Believe it or not, there is still this illusion that Linux and open-source software is written by counter-culture, C++ programming cultists living in their parent basements or huddled together in Cambridge, Mass. group-houses. Now Cnet reports that the Linux Foundation has found that "over 70% of all [Linux] kernel development is demonstrably done by developers who are being paid for their work." That Linux is primarily developed by paid developers should come as no surprise considering that Linux enables many companies--hardware, software, and online services--to be more competitive in their markets and to find new ways to generate revenue. "What’s important about how Linux and open-source software is created isn’t the side issues of politics or how its developers are perceived; it’s that its fundamental methodology produces better software," writes Stephen Vaughan-Nichols. "That’s why businesses invest in Linux’s development. Linux works. If it didn’t, big business wouldn’t bother with it.""

Submission + - No more sublets through craigslist in New York

yurik writes: No more craigslist. No more AirBnB. Soon if you visit New York, hotel may be your only lodging option. NY state bills A10008 / S6873 sponsored by hotel lobby seek to outlaw individuals renting out our apartments for less than a month.

From — "New York state senators vote on a bill that would make it illegal for any homeowner or renter to sublet for less than a month. The new law would be a blanket ban on short-term rentals no matter how ethical the renter is."

Another ref

Submission + - Are anti virus programs just as bad as a virus? ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: I purchased a new laptop. It's not infected with viruses. But it is infected with all sorts of anti virus trials and other automated things running installed by the laptop vendor to keep the computer "healthy" In my opinion these things are just as annoying as a virus. Every time I turn on my system the virus scan has to check the whole system. Then I get pop ups every 10 minutes telling me the trial is about to expire.. hurry hurry and give us your credit card number. Then pop ups saying hit has expired. There is never an option to say "stop bugging me I don't care".
Isn't this behavior the same as some virus programs. Annoying pop ups, check. Asking for your credit card, check. Not easy to remove, check.

  I have serious doubts as to the effectiveness of these anti virus programs. So the question to Slashdot is. "Are Anti virus and similar programs just as annoying as an actual virus itself"


Airport Scanners Can Store and Transmit Images 350

CNN is reporting on findings from a Freedom of Information request initiated by the Electronic Privacy Information Center that has revealed that, contrary to public statements by the Transportation Security Agency, full-body scanners can store and transmit images. "In the [FOIA] documents, obtained by the privacy group and provided to CNN, the TSA specifies that the body scanners it purchases must have the ability to store and send images when in 'test mode.' ... 'There is no way for someone in the airport environment to put the machine into the test mode,' [an anonymous] official said, adding that test mode can be enabled only in TSA test facilities. But the official declined to say whether activating test mode requires additional hardware, software or simply additional knowledge of how the machines operate."

Facebook's Zuckerberg Says Forget Privacy 415

judgecorp writes "Privacy is no longer a social norm, according to the founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg. Speaking at the Crunchie awards in San Francisco, the entrepreneur said that expectations had changed, and people now default to sharing online, not privacy. It's all right for him, but does he mean it's ok for bodies like the UK government to monitor all citizens' Internet use?"

One picture is worth 128K words.