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Programming

+ - Beyond Ajax: Software Development, 2 Years Hence

Submitted by Esther Schindler
Esther Schindler (16185) writes "Ajax has dramatically changed the lives of Web developers during the past two years, but the next two may be even more interesting. Developers—spurred by user expectations, rapidly evolving business models and ever-changing development processes—will need to do things they can't even imagine today. And how can a forward-thinking IT department or entrepreneur—who is so dependent on innovative software developers—prepare for that future?

In a set of five articles, beginning with Beyond Ajax, CIO.com interviewed the tool builders. Their vision of the computing future will shape the tools they build, which means those are the programming tools you'll use in a few years to build your own applications. But while CIO.com spoke with vendors, it was the techies, not the marketroids: folks like Tim Bray, Scott Guthrie, David Intersimone. Input was solicited from both vendors of proprietary software (such as Microsoft and Adobe) and open source projects (such as the Dojo Toolkit, and Open Laszlo).

Their predictions address the next round of developer opportunities, problems—and consequences. The articles cover a range of subjects, from The Convergence of Desktop, Web and Mobile Clients to UI changes (the immersive, cinematic interface) to evolving development tools which should make software development easier (what Dojo's Alex Russell called "Interceding with the Browser gods").

But Are Web Browsers Ready for the Next Generation of Internet Applications? Probably not, according to Tim Bray, who said, "The people who make a living building Web apps and tools for them live on a different planet than the people who build browsers." All those problems... er, challenges were packaged up and handed to the folks who run Mozilla and IE, and the browser dudes responded about making the Internet trustworthy, standards-compatible and innovative. ("All three at once? That's the tough part.")"
Privacy

+ - Woman Denied Teaching Degree Over MySpace Photo

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A woman was denied a teaching degree by Pennsylvania based Millersville University at the last minute, due to a "Drunken Pirate" photo of her on her own MySpace page. According to the story, even though Ms. Snyder received "competent" or "superior" ratings in her final student-teacher evaluation, she was ultimately denied the teaching degree. Conestoga Valley High School threatened to no longer accept student-teachers from Millersville University if Ms. Snyder went unpunished for her "Drunken Pirate" photo."
Sony

+ - Sony Decapitates a Goat in PR Stunt

Submitted by AbsoluteXyro
AbsoluteXyro (1048620) writes "PETA is going to be pissed. London Entertainment Guide (Slightly NSFW) breaks the news that electronics giant Sony, in another stroke of marketing brilliance, decided to decapitate a goat and invite guests to "reach inside the goat's still-warm carcass to eat offal from its stomach" as a PR stunt to promote God of War II at a recent party in Athens. Images from the party, including at least one showing the freshly decapitated goat's head hanging by it's corpse by a thread of tissue, have been published in a two page spread in the latest edition of Playstation Magazine. Interestingly, Sony UK has refused to say how the goat was killed, but judging by the pictures, we can guess."
Software

+ - Tackling The Astroturfing Problem

Submitted by Dalton Georgia
Dalton Georgia (321706) writes "After a reporter at Forbes.com wrote a negative review of Iolo System Mechanic 7, someone pretending to be a random user posted numerous comments on the blog post. They said they had just tried the software, loved it, and accused the reporter of being paid off by Iolo's competitors. But a little digging revealed that the comments actually came from an IP address at Iolo headquarters. This practice of faking grassroots support has its own term, astroturfing, and is increasingly common in the tech business. Can we ever trust user reviews again?"
Role Playing (Games)

+ - WoW Gold paid for real sex

Submitted by
Shohat
Shohat writes "A woman posted an ad on Craigslist, offering a certain something for some quick cash in her game of choice, WoW.The offer was very specific, and And she got what she wanted — enough money an epic flying mount - Screenshots of the postings prior to removal .
First of all, is this prostitution? Sure seems like it, although MMO money isn't entirely established as legally worth real money yet, even if people buy and sell it all the time on multiple online and offline markets."

OLPC: Fading or stronger than ever?->

From feed by nffeed
Recent events -- $3 Windows for the developing world, competition from Intel, and a $175.00 pricetag for OLPC's $100.00 laptop -- have some reporters and analysts suggesting the project may be in trouble. But are those dire forecasts credible or are they simply wishful thinking by the Wintel faithful?
Link to Original Source
User Journal

SPAM: New World Translation 2

Journal by mercedo

I obtained a tiny Bible called 'New World Translation' from a friend of mine who belongs to Watchtower Bible and Tract Society, who is an assistant professor in some college. I tried browsing it a little but I didn't realise it is particular as some slashdotter pointed out in my previous JE. This Bible is translated from the viewpoint of unity of God as opposed to trinity, but for me this is not so important. They use 'God's active force' instead of using 'The Spirit of God' and 'obeisance' i

Networking

+ - The Internet as WorldBeam

Submitted by
GaryOlson
GaryOlson writes "Forbes Special Report focuses on The Power of Networks. Included with articles by Networking Pioneers and a new media Internet billionaire, an academic intruduces us to a new metaphor for the Internet as a WorldBeam". The basic architecural design is summarized "The Worldbeam and another design construct, the Empty Computer, go hand in hand." and "Many sorts of information are blended together in the Worldbeam, just as many colors are combined into a beam of white light."

I am just wondering if that beam will be coherent enough to be useful.
"

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