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Comment: Re:Pick your units of radiation... (Score -1, Flamebait) 189

by fnj (#47528391) Attached to: One Trillion Bq Released By Nuclear Debris Removal At Fukushima So Far

For crying out loud, one becquerel is a single ATOM popping its top off. Imagine if we measured visible light this way instead of via lumens. Much bigger numbers.

For god's sake if the simple quantity bothers you for some reason, just call it one terabequerel. I'm sure you'll feel much better about one of something than a trillion of something else. Just like 100 kg is perfectly all right, but my god 100,000 grams? Time for a diet!

Myself, I kinda like calling it a trillion bequerels, because a thousand thousand thousand thousand atoms "popping their tops" is pretty much a fucking disaster, and it's less likely that moronic assholes will just shrug it off.

Comment: Re:Here we go... (Score 1) 454

by fnj (#47505535) Attached to: MIT's Ted Postol Presents More Evidence On Iron Dome Failures

Will Israel promise that if Hamas puts all its rocket launchers, military command and control, and military supplies neatly organised in easily identifiable military bases, Israel won't simply send a missile to figuratively cook all those eggs being put in one basket?

Are you so high you don't realize how stupid that sounds? Why would they do such an illogical thing?

Comment: Re:headed in the wrong direction (Score 4, Interesting) 230

by fnj (#47494069) Attached to: EPA Mulling Relaxed Radiation Protections For Nuclear Power

So long as people ... live in areas with above-average background radiation

Which is to say, forever. By definition precisely one half of the population live with background radiation above the median level. That can be stated without any knowledge whatsoever of what that median level is or what the distribution is. It is a truism. I'm not aware of the precise statisic for percentage living with above average background radiation, but for example we do know that the natural background radiation in Finland is about three times that in the UK.

Comment: Re:meanwhile overnight... (Score 1) 503

by fnj (#47486619) Attached to: Russia Prepares For Internet War Over Malaysian Jet

Ukraine had some in their possession from their days as a Soviet satellite state

Ukraine was never a "Soviet satellite state". It was an integral republic of the Soviet Union, and the second most important one, from the first year of the Soviet Union.

List of the republics of the Soviet Union:
Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (member since 1922) (population in 1989 147 million)
Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (1922) (52M)
Unbek Soviet Socialist Republic (1924) (20M)
Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic (1936) (17M)
Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic (1922) (10M)
Azerbaijan Soviet Socialist Republic (1922) (7M)
Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic (1922) (5M)
Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic (1929) 5M
Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic (1940) (4M)
Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic (1936) (4M)
Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic (1940) (4M)
Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic (1924) (4M)
Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic (1922) (3M)
Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic (1940) (3M)
Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic (1940) (2M)

The three Baltic republics (Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) was disputed as an illegal occupation, but none of the others were.

The states referred to in some quarters as satellite states were such as Poland, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, etc. Most of them were People's Republics or Socialist Republics or Democratic Republics, but none had "Soviet" in their name. They were formally independent but heavily influenced by the Soviet Union.

Comment: Curious OS design shortcoming (Score 1) 151

by fnj (#47470927) Attached to: LibreSSL PRNG Vulnerability Patched

Not an expert in OS design details, but I'm quite surprised there exists an OS which newly hands out the same PID a very recent process had. Do not PIDs monotonically increase until they wrap around? If not, why not? And why are they not based on adequately large integers? 32 bits for a minimum; why not 64? Yeah, it will uglify a ps display, but eyes on the security ball here. My 64-bit Arch linux on kernel 3.15 is saying 15 bits (cat /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max = 32768).

For that matter, Is there any reason not to make sure all PIDs issued on a given system for a given power cycle are unique? Yeah, it would be a tradeoff against performance.

Comment: Re:"unwarranted invasion of personal privacy" (Score 1) 231

by fnj (#47447203) Attached to: NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

could you quote the section of the US Constitution that establishes the right to privacy?

OK, this ring a bell? The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

That's the fourth amendment, in case you are at a loss.

It's kinda hard to have any privacy when jackbooted thugs can just bust in and rifle through your effects on a whim, no?

"Just think of a computer as hardware you can program." -- Nigel de la Tierre

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