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Submission + - Wikileaks, JP Morgan and the Insider-Trading Howto ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: Wikileaks hits the locusts again! In an internal JPM document published today, Wikileaks exposes JP Morgan's efforts to circumvent insider trading regulations, enabling the really wealthy clients to profit even when others are losing. The document reads like a how-to and explains such maneuvers under the hood of SEC Rule 10b5-1, which had been considered subject to abuse for some time already. Now this abuse is publically documented and shall not pass unnoticed!

Submission + - Antivirus Inventor: Security pros are wasting time ( 1

talkinsecurity writes: "Peter Tippett, chief scientist at the ICSA and the inventor of the progam that became Norton Antivirus, had some interesting things to say Monday about the state of the security industry. In a nutshell, Tippett warned that about a third of the work that security departments do today is a waste of time. Tippett goes on to systematically blow holes in a lot of security's current best practices, including vulnerability research/patching, strong passwords, and the product evaluation process. Some of his arguments are definitely debatable, but there is a lot of truth to what he's saying as well. It definitely makes you think."
Media (Apple)

Submission + - Old Braun Products Hold Secrets to Apple's Future (

An anonymous reader writes: 'The year 2008 marks the 10th Anniversary of the iMac, the computer that changed everything at Apple, hailing a new design era spearheaded by design genius Jonathan Ive. What most people don't know is that there's another man whose products are at the heart of Ive's design philosophy, an influence that permeates every single product at Apple, from hardware to user-interface design. That man is Dieter Rams, and his old designs for Braun during the '50s and '60s hold all the clues not only for past and present Apple products, but their future as well.' The comparisons in the article are striking, as well as the thoughts on the matter. However, it's even more interesting to see so many old amazing products and trying to figure out what elements the Next Big Thing from Apple may take.
The Internet

Submission + - 'When the patient is a Googler'

netbuzz writes: "A New York orthopedist's essay carrying that headline sets out to make the point that patients who rely more on their Web browsers than the expertise of their doctors are likely to be ill served by both. It's a valid enough point, but the doctor in this case so savages the patient he puts forth as Exhibit A — a 40-something Mom with an unruly 3-year-old — that he's likely to send even more skeptics of modern medicine scurrying for the Internet."

Submission + - Pen testing and unintended consequences. 2

shdo writes: Over at Craig Goranson submitted a thought provoking question about unintended consequences of pen testing.

A nagging feeling is telling me that this is just the tip of the iceberg and one which is not only something we will need to take in to account but the possibility of abuse is staggering.

Submission + - Brain Differences In Democrats and Republicans

i_like_spam writes: Scientists from NYU and UCLA report in Nature Neuroscience that the brains of Democrats and Republicans process information differently. This new study finds that the differences are apparent even when the brain processes common information, not just political topics. From the study, liberals were more likely to be accurate and showed more brain activity in the region associated with analyzing conflicts. A researcher not affiliated with the study stated, liberals 'could be expected to more readily accept new social, scientific or religious ideas.' Moreover, 'the results could explain why President Bush demonstrated a single-minded commitment to the Iraq war and why some people perceived Sen. John F. Kerry ... as a flip-flopper.

Submission + - GPL Violations On Windows Go Unnoticed?

Scott_F writes: I recently reviewed several commercial, closed-source slideshow authoring packages for Windows and came across an alarming trend. Several of the packages I installed included GPL and LGPL software without any mention of the GPL, much less source code. For example, DVD Photo Slideshow ( included mkisofs, cdrdao, dvdauthor, spumux, id3lib, lame, mpeg2enc and mplex (all of which are GPL or LGPL). What's worse is that the company tried to hide this by wrapping them all in DLL's! There are other violations in other packages as well. It seems that use of GPL software in commercial Windows applications is on the rise based on my testing of other software. My question is how much are GPL violations in the Windows world being pursued? Does the FSF or EFF follow-up on these if the platform is not GPL? How aware is the community of this trend?

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