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+ - New Mexico driver's license soon will not be valid for air travel ->

Submitted by fintler
fintler (140604) writes "Due to the expected enforcement of the REAL ID Act on Jan. 15, 2013, New Mexico travelers will need to be prepared to have TSA approved identification to be allowed to board a commercial aircraft. New Mexico driver's licenses are not valid valid identification after the law is in effect."
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IOS

+ - TorChat client for iOS approved by Apple->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "I know that there are a lot of people waiting for TorChat on their iPhone, so i just wanted to let you know that there is a client which was approved by Apple on the App Store called "iTorChat"."
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+ - The White Noise of Smell->

Submitted by Frosty Piss
Frosty Piss (770223) writes "Scientists have discovered a new smell, but you may have to go to a laboratory to experience it yourself. The smell is dubbed "olfactory white," because it is the nasal equivalent of white noise, researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Just as white noise is a mixture of many different sound frequencies and white light is a mixture of many different wavelengths, olfactory white is a mixture of many different smells. In a series of experiments, they exposed participants to hundreds of equally mixed smells, and what they discovered is that our brains treat smells as a single unit, not as a mixture of compounds to break down, analyze and put back together again.. The web site LiveScience talks about it here."
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+ - Nexus 4 includes support for LTE->

Submitted by slashchuck
slashchuck (617840) writes "One of the drawbacks of Google's Nexus $ was its lack of support for 4G LTE. Now comes a report from Anand Tech that is supported on on the Nexus 4.

It seems that a simple software update can allow the Nexus 4 smartphone to run on LTE Band 4. All users have to do is dial *#*#4636#*#* (INFO) or launch the Phone Info app. After that, choosing to connect to AWS networks should allow the Nexus 4 to run on LTE networks on Band 4.

The AnandTech report states explicitly that the LG Nexus 4 only works on LTE Band 4, on 1700/2100MHz frequencies, and supports bandwidths of 5,10, and 20MHz."

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AI

+ - Scientists See Advances in Deep Learning, a Part of Artificial Intelligence - NY->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Advances in an artificial intelligence technology that can recognize patterns offer the possibility of machines that perform human activities like seeing, listening and thinking. ... But what is new in recent months is the growing speed and accuracy of deep-learning programs, often called artificial neural networks or just 'neural nets' for their resemblance to the neural connections in the brain. 'There has been a number of stunning new results with deep-learning methods,' said Yann LeCun, a computer scientist at New York University who did pioneering research in handwriting recognition at Bell Laboratories. 'The kind of jump we are seeing in the accuracy of these systems is very rare indeed.' Artificial intelligence researchers are acutely aware of the dangers of being overly optimistic. ... But recent achievements have impressed a wide spectrum of computer experts. In October, for example, a team of graduate students studying with the University of Toronto computer scientist Geoffrey E. Hinton won the top prize in a contest sponsored by Merck to design software to help find molecules that might lead to new drugs. From a data set describing the chemical structure of 15 different molecules, they used deep-learning software to determine which molecule was most likely to be an effective drug agent."
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Games

+ - What Nobody Tells You About Being a Game Dev->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Alex Norton is the man behind Malevolence: The Sword of Ahkranox, an upcoming indie action-RPG. What makes Malevolence interesting is that it's infinite. It uses procedural generation to create a world that's actually endless. Norton jumped into this project without having worked any big gaming studios, and in this article he shares what he's learned as an independent game developer. Quoting: "A large, loud portion of the public will openly hate you regardless of what you do. Learn to live with it. No-one will ever take your project as seriously as you, or fully realise what you’re going through. ... The odds of you making money out of it are slim. If you want to succeed, you’ll likely have to sell out. Just how MUCH you sell out is up to you.' He also suggests new game devs avoid RPGs for their first titles, having a thorough plan before you begin (i.e. game concepts explained well enough that a non-gamer could understand), and to consider carefully whether the game will benefit from a public development process."
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Comment: Re:ummm, no. (Score 3) 112

by fintler (#42062183) Attached to: Supercomputers' Growing Resilience Problems

Google is having the same problems that this article describes -- they haven't fixed it either.

If your problem domain can always be broken down into map-reduce, you can easily solve it with a hadoop-like environment to get fault tolerance. If your application falls outside of map-reduce (the applications this article is referring to), you need to start duplicating state (very expensive on systems of this scale) to recover from failures.

Comment: Re:"and they halt operations when they do so" (Score 1) 112

by fintler (#42062125) Attached to: Supercomputers' Growing Resilience Problems

Checkpoints will probably stick around for quite some time, but the model will need to change. Rather than serializing everything all the way down to a parallel filesystem, the data could potentially be checkpointed to a burst buffer (assuming a per-node design) or a nearby node (experimental SCR design). Of course, it's correct that even this won't scale to larger systems.

I think we'll probably have problems with getting data out to the nodes of the cluster before we start running into problems with checkpointing. The typical NFS home directory isn't going to scale. We'll need to switch over to something like udsl projections or another IO forwarding layer in the near future.

+ - Keccak is the winner of NIST's SHA-3 competition->

Submitted by
fintler
fintler writes "The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is pleased to announce the selection of Keccak as the winner of the SHA-3 Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition and the new SHA-3 hash algorithm. Keccak was designed by a team of cryptographers from Belgium and Italy, they are:

* Guido Bertoni (Italy) of STMicroelectronics,
* Joan Daemen (Belgium) of STMicroelectronics,
* Michaël Peeters (Belgium) of NXP Semiconductors, and
* Gilles Van Assche (Belgium) of STMicroelectronics.

NIST formally announced the SHA-3 competition in 2007 with an open call for the submission of candidate hash algorithms, and received 64 submissions from cryptographers around the world. In an ongoing review process, including two open conferences, the cryptographic community provided an enormous amount of expert feedback, andNIST winnowed the original 64 candidates down to the five finalist candidates – BLAKE, Grøstl, JH, Keccak and Skein. These finalists were further reviewed in a third public conference in March 2012.

NIST chose Keccak over the four other excellent finalists for its elegant design, large security margin, good general performance, excellent efficiency in hardware implementations, and for its flexibility. Keccak uses a new “sponge construction” chaining mode, based on a fixed permutation, that can readily be adjusted to trade generic security strength for throughput, and can generate larger or smaller hash outputs as required. The Keccak designers have also defined a modified chaining mode for Keccak that provides authenticated encryption. Additionally, Keccak complements the existing SHA-2 family of hash algorithms well. NIST remains confident in the security of SHA-2 which is now widely implemented, and the SHA-2 hash algorithms will continue to be used for the foreseeable future, as indicated in the NIST hash policy statement. One benefit that Keccak offers as the SHA-3 winner is its difference in design and implementation properties from that of SHA-2. It seems very unlikely that a single new cryptanalytic attack or approach could threaten both algorithms. Similarly, the very different implementation properties of the two algorithms will allow future application and protocol designers greater flexibility infinding one of the two hash algorithms that fits well with their requirements. NIST thanks the many people in companies, universities, laboratories and organizations around the world that participated in and contributed to the SHA-3 competition, especially the submitters of all the candidate algorithms, and the many others who contributed expert cryptanalysis, and performance studies. NIST could not have done the competition without them.

A detailed report of the final round of the competition will be published in the near future. Information about the SHA-3 competition is available at: http://www.nist.gov/hash-competition"

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The Media

+ - Radio Station Prank to Datamine Email Addresses->

Submitted by
fintler
fintler writes "A Philadelphia radio station, The Beat (100.3), ran a contest on April fools day and managed to increase their e-mail database by around 2000 people. At the end of the day, the contest turned out to be a fake. According to FCC regulations, "[It is required] that a licensee that broadcasts or advertises information about a contest that it conducts shall fully and accurately disclose the material terms of the contest, and shall conduct the contest substantially as announced or advertised. No contest description shall be false, misleading or deceptive with respect to any material term". So, what should happen now?"
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