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Comment: Re:Well I guess it's a good thing... (Score 2) 201

It's an arm's race.

FYI, a great way to "defend" your computer is to not intentionally put it on the front-line.

by "not putting it on the front line", do you mean not going to websites? like, at all?

i mean, the article specifically notes adult websites here, but these sorts of drive-by installs and sideloading exploits occur on more mainstream sites, too. are you saying to simply not use the web?

Comment: Re:Well I guess it's a good thing... (Score 5, Insightful) 201

I'm curious... At this point do we just expect everything to be 100% free? Or do we think money fairies give companies the capital to pay for bandwidth and processing power?

i'm curious...at this point should we accept malware as just a regular part of going to websites?

the question's rhetorical of course - until websites prevent malware from being distributed through their ad networks, i will block ALL ads to defend my computer.

Comment: Re:No way! (Score 1) 512

You realize that this hypothetical other employer has exactly the same incentives and goals as the first one, right?

you realize that this still does not make H-1B employment "indentured servitude," right?

let's debate the pros and cons of policy, but let's debate them using actual facts, not just what people believe. too many people argue about US immigration without knowing even remotely how the immigration laws actually work.

Comment: Re:Que calls for net neutrality... (Score 5, Informative) 70

So Verizon inject encrypted cookies that identify the user, then sell the decryption key to add companies, so they can track users. I'd be reviewing the terms and conditions of the internet service. Surely they don't allow tampering? People should shame Verizon publicly and leave them, but calls for net neutrality laws are misguided. Verizon makes money from this, so they should end up cheaper than competitors who don't do this. Customers are free to choose to have less privacy for a cheaper service. Regulation isn't needed.

the "market" does not correct for corrupt practices like these, despite every libertarian fantasy to the contrary.

Comment: Re:It's a badly written article/summary (Score 1) 484

by fightinfilipino (#48816957) Attached to: IEEE: New H-1B Bill Will "Help Destroy" US Tech Workforce

you're...you're claiming that employers are laying out large sums of money to set up diploma mills to intentionally hire foreign nationals?

Actually, no, that's not what I was claiming--sorry about being too brief. What happens, currently, is that the Indian body shops send them here for a degree, then bring them back to India, and then tell prospective clients that "x% of our programmers hold master's degrees from US colleges." So it's not US employers spending large sums of money in order to hire foreign nationals, it's foreign companies spending middling sums of money to find yet one more way to deceive clients about their capabilities and competence. Anyway, my point was that the mills are already here.

you're going to have to cite some sources, because this is a claim that beggars belief.

the Dept. of Homeland Security has a pretty high standard on what they deem a valid higher ed institution. they rely on AACRAO standards [aacrao.org] in their determinations. that weeds out a lot of the diploma mills.

And, if this no-cap on advanced degrees passes, just watch the next logical step unfold--legislation removing the accreditation standards. Bet on it :-(

highly doubtful. this same removal of the cap on advanced degrees has been before Congress in various forms. the point of that legislation is to attract and keep highly educated foreign nationals in the U.S.

Comment: Re:It's a badly written article/summary (Score 4, Informative) 484

by fightinfilipino (#48816033) Attached to: IEEE: New H-1B Bill Will "Help Destroy" US Tech Workforce

...except that's not what the law says. it's an advanced STEM degree from a U.S. institution. to qualify for the H-1B cap exemption...

The Indian body shops already have set up diploma mills in the US to rubber-stamp master's degrees.

you're...you're claiming that employers are laying out large sums of money to set up diploma mills to intentionally hire foreign nationals?

the Dept. of Homeland Security has a pretty high standard on what they deem a valid higher ed institution. they rely on AACRAO standards in their determinations. that weeds out a lot of the diploma mills.

Comment: Re:It's a badly written article/summary (Score 5, Informative) 484

by fightinfilipino (#48815853) Attached to: IEEE: New H-1B Bill Will "Help Destroy" US Tech Workforce

It's using the phrase "offshoring" to mean Americans losing jobs to cheaper foreign workers in general. Probably because by now everyone understands that "offshoring" == "bad". It doesn't change the fact that the basic point (the death of American IT) is correct. If you can bring anyone in with an "Advanced STEM" degree then India will just open more schools to rubber stamp 'em. Race to the bottom.

except that's not what the law says. it's an advanced STEM degree from a U.S. institution. to qualify for the H-1B cap exemption, you have to have been awarded a degree from a U.S. higher ed institute. this drives immigrants to come to the U.S. for schooling and become invested in the U.S.

the law also requires H-1B employers to meet prevailing wage levels set by the DOL, so that U.S. workers are not undercut. enforcement has been admittedly shoddy, but has gotten much better in recent years. (the fines against Tata and Infosys being two of the better known examples).

Comment: Re:Environmentalists is why we still pump carbon (Score 1) 652

by fightinfilipino (#48459085) Attached to: Two Google Engineers Say Renewables Can't Cure Climate Change

Ironically, environmentalists and their 'spooky nuclear' protests is why we are still so reliant on fossil fuels and still pumping carbon into atmosphere. Nuclear technology, especially breeder reactors that produce minimal waste, is how you eliminate emissions. Wind and solar are unsuitable for base load due to variability, and require often non-renewable backups.

while i agree in part, anti-nuclear proponents have a point: nuclear energy is dangerous if not carefully managed and handled. Fukushima and Chernobyl are deadly enough reminders.

Comment: Re:Just tell me (Score 4, Interesting) 463

by fightinfilipino (#48150417) Attached to: Positive Ebola Test In Second Texas Health Worker

simple. because those persons can go to a third country and then travel from there. it creates an impetus for persons from West Africa to simply try to evade such controls. this would of course worsen the situation, not improve it.

the world as a whole needs to be sending more resources to West Africa to fight the epidemic *there*. that is the only thing that will help stop this from becoming an actual pandemic.

"Stupidity, like virtue, is its own reward" -- William E. Davidsen

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