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Comment: Re:Best takeaway from Star Wars and Star Trek? (Score 1) 126

by fibonacci8 (#49324427) Attached to: Boeing Patents <em>Star Wars</em> Style Force Field Technology
Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the galaxy lies a small, unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this at a distance of roughly 92 million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue-green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea. -- The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams
Star Wars Prequels

Boeing Patents Star Wars Style Force Field Technology 126

Posted by samzenpus
from the power-up-the-deflector-shield dept.
An anonymous reader was one of many to point out that Boeing doesn't want to rely on a sad devotion to an ancient religion to protect aircraft and conjure up the stolen data tapes, but plans on using force fields instead. "Boeing's new patent may let the force be with you even in real life. The aircraft and defense company has taken a cue from science fiction with its plan to develop a Star Wars style force field that would use energy to deflect any potential damage. Just liking the luminescent shields seen in the film, Boeing's "Method and system for shock wave attenuation via electromagnetic arc" could provide a real-life layer of protection from nearby impacts to targets. The downside: It won't protect from direct hits."
Google

Craig Brittain (Revenge Porn King) Sues For Use of Image 122

Posted by samzenpus
from the what's-good-for-the-goose-is-good-for-the-disgusting-gander dept.
retroworks writes "Washington Post reporter Caitlin Dewey leads with, "Revenge-porn impresario Craig Brittain is learning the hard way that karma is a real witch." The report states that the Federal Trade Commission has settled a complaint against Brittain, whose defunct site, "Is Anybody Down" was accused of unfair business practices. From the article: "The site paid its bills by soliciting women's nude photos on Craigslist and/or from their exes, publishing the photos without the women's permission (and often with their names and phone numbers attached), and then charging fees of $200 to $500 to take the photos down." Brittain agreed to destroy the image and never operate a revenge porn site again. However, On Feb. 9, "Brittain filed a takedown request to Google, demanding that the search engine stop linking to nearly two dozen URLs — including a number of news articles, and files on the case from the FTC — because they used photos of him and information about him without his permission." Ars Technica explains. "In this instance, fair use and general First Amendment principles are on Google's and the media's side."

Comment: Re:Stomp Feet (Score 1) 391

by fibonacci8 (#49153359) Attached to: Verizon Posts Message In Morse Code To Mock FCC's Net Neutrality Ruling
Unfortunately, using Verizon's logic, Verizon should be paying the postal service extra to deliver their snark to the FCC rather than arriving in a timely fashion like say, transmission at a speed agreed upon in a contract between a service provider and customers at each end. And the postal service should be permitted to raise the price for certain customers based on increased quantity of mail sent over some arbitrary amount that can only be interpreted as "too much / we want more money / your speech isn't as free as the other customers'. "

Comment: Re:Huh? (Score 1) 220

by fibonacci8 (#49078447) Attached to: Obama Says He's 'A Strong Believer In Strong Encryption'
You can want to keep something that someone else can make non-existant. Neither the affordable care act, nor an insurance company dropping policies in anticipation of it or as the result of it, prevents a person from wanting to keep a plan that he or she likes. It's the same kind of weasel words that you'll find in almost any given commercial, promises nothing useful, and can be mistaken for meaning almost anything at all from the listener's angle.
The Almighty Buck

Microsoft Trademarks "Windows 365" 191

Posted by samzenpus
from the one-easy-payment dept.
jones_supa writes The talks about a subscription-based Windows have begun again. With Windows 10 those ideas did not materialize in the way that many had speculated. Even though Microsoft has not fully detailed its Windows 10 pricing strategy, it is not believed that Microsoft is targeting an annual subscription charge for Windows at this time. However, it turns out that Microsoft has recently filed for a trademark for Windows 365, which adds a bit of fuel to the subscription based version of Windows. As of right now, Microsoft has only claimed this branding right, but as for what they will do with it, only time will tell. Deep inside the company, the idea is clearly still bubbling there.

Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it.

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