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Comment: Wrong Channel (Score 1) 191

by fibonacci8 (#47907553) Attached to: New Details About NSA's Exhaustive Search of Edward Snowden's Emails
Knowing what both the NSA and Snowden claim to have known during the discourse, why would Snowden use such an insecure channel of communication as email to voice objections? Other countries' government agents would likely have taken notice if he'd used something as insecure even as "internal" email.

Comment: Re:Doom by boredom (Score 1) 170

It was hard and required some skill. Thats what made it enjoyable.

It was easy and required less skill than its precursors like Everquest, Ultima Online, and Anarchy Online. That's what made it enjoyable to players under the age of 8. About the only thing at the time requiring less skill and with less difficulty was Asheron's Call.

Privacy

Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos 336

Posted by samzenpus
from the gates-are-open dept.
swinferno writes with news about the leak of hundreds of private celebrity photos over the weekend. Hundreds of revealing pictures of female celebrities were leaked overnight after being stolen from their private collections. Hunger Games actress Jennifer Lawrence, Kirsten Dunst, and pop star Ariana Grande were among the celebrities apparently shown in the pictures, which were posted on infamous web forum 4chan. It's unclear how the images were obtained, but anonymous 4chan users said that they were taken from celebrities' iCloud accounts. The accounts are designed to allow iPhone, iPad, and Mac users to synchronize images, settings, calendar information, and other data between devices, but the service has been criticized for being unreliable and confusing. Earlier this year, Jennifer Lawrence herself complained about the service in an interview with MTV.
Facebook

Facebook Cleans Up News Feed By Reducing Click-Bait Headlines 61

Posted by samzenpus
from the 20-shocking-reasons-this-won't-work dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Facebook today announced further plans to clean up the News Feed by reducing stories with click-bait headlines as well as stories that have links shared in the captions of photos or within status updates. The move comes just four months after the social network reduced Like-baiting posts, repeated content, and spammy links."
Censorship

Put A Red Cross PSA In Front Of the ISIS Beheading Video 300

Posted by samzenpus
from the for-the-greater-good dept.
Bennett Haselton writes After footage of James Foley's beheading by ISIS terrorists was posted online on Tuesday, Twitter and Youtube elected to remove any footage or links to the footage posted by users. Obviously this reduces the incentive for terrorist groups to post such content, by shrinking their audience, but it also reduces the public's access to information. Would it be ethical to make the content available, if it was preceded by an advertisement for a cause that runs counter to everything ISIS stands for? Read below to see what Bennett has to say.
The Internet

Ask Slashdot: Would You Pay For Websites Without Trolls? 382

Posted by samzenpus
from the play-nice dept.
First time accepted submitter carbon_tet writes I read two articles this week that made me wonder: "Would anyone actually pay for a website without trolls?" The first, was about web trolls and civility on the internet, and the second about the ad-based internet. It seems that public comments unavoidably have trolls, or they degrade very quickly until someone makes a reference to Hitler. So, is it impossible to have a substantive discussion online without trolls? Would you put your money where your mouth is to have a serious online conversation without them? Are there any topics that you would talk about (or prefer to see talked about) on a website where trolls were paywalled out?
Advertising

Bezos-Owned Washington Post Embeds Amazon Buy-It-Now Buttons Mid-sentence 136

Posted by Soulskill
from the wait-till-they-start-delivering-papers-with-drones dept.
McGruber writes: While reading a story in the Jeff Bezos-owned Washington Post, I saw that the paper had begun embedding Amazon Buy-It-Now links in the middle of story sentences. For example, in this article, a sentence about the sales figures for differing covers of The Great Gatsby read: At Politics and Prose, the traditional [BUY IT NOW] version — featuring the iconic eyes floating on a blue background — sold better than the DiCaprio [BUY IT NOW] cover. This change follows the July news of much larger than expected losses at Amazon and a 10-percent decline in the Amazon's stock value. In related news, the Post reports that the literary executor of George Orwell's estate has accused Amazon.com of doublespeak after they cited one of Orwell's essays in their ebook pricing debate with Hachette and other publishers.

Comment: Re:Also human (Score 1) 277

by fibonacci8 (#47475363) Attached to: Sony Forgets To Pay For Domain, Hilarity Ensues
However when you forget once for several thousand customers all at once, each one is likely to take it as a seperate occasion. It's also perfectly normal to treat a mistake that affects orders of magnitude more people as orders of magnitude more irritating. Also it wasn't amusing for anyone affected that I've talked to, it was a combination or irritating and annoying.

Sincerely,
Someone who worked around the issue himself, but then got to spend hours via ventrilo and skype helping other players adjust their DNS settings so they could play the game they'd paid for.

P.S. Dear Sony: I would gladly maintain correspondence with your name / hosting providers in exchange for continued all-access membership during such periods.

Comment: Necessity (Score 1) 280

by fibonacci8 (#47466935) Attached to: Selectively Reusing Bad Passwords Is Not a Bad Idea, Researchers Say
Using weak passwords for cases when a password at all is unnecessary should be the norm as a defense against phishing, even by a company you presently trust. Mandatory complexity increases are probably being used already to undermine password variety. When a password has to be one thing different each time (another capital letter, another numeral, another punctuation mark) a service of dubious character could very quickly spot patterns that could be used improperly.

1 + 1 = 3, for large values of 1.

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