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+ - SPAM: How did JFK get it wrong?

Submitted by ffreeloader
ffreeloader (1105115) writes "JFK, in his inaugural address, made some very important assertions:

1. "The world is very different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe — the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state, but from the hand of God.

We dare not forget today that we are the heirs of that first revolution. Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans — born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage — and unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of those human rights to which this Nation has always been committed, and to which we are committed today at home and around the world."

2. "Finally, to those nations who would make themselves our adversary, we offer not a pledge but a request: that both sides begin anew the quest for peace, before the dark powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction.

We dare not tempt them with weakness. For only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed. "

3. "So let us begin anew — remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof."

4. "In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than in mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again — not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are — but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself.

Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shank from this responsibility — I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavour will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country."

Our current President governs from what is almost a completely opposite point of view. His mantra is not to ask what you can do for your country, but how much you can ask for from your country. He pushes a sense of entitlement, as does the entire political left, which is exactly the opposite of JFK's theme. So, how and why was JFK wrong about so many things? To the Democratic party today his inaugural speech would have been heresy. The rights of man coming from God and not the government? Asking people to serve rather than to be served by their government? Understanding that we dare not tempt our enemies by showing weakness, political or military, and understanding that the cost of freedom requires both economic and personal sacrifice? How do these concepts fit into the liberal philosophy today? I can't see these concepts being put forward anywhere by the left."
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