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Comment: Re:What about *MY* drones? (Score 1) 107

by felisconcolori (#41346177) Attached to: Report Hints At Privacy Problem of Drones That Can Recognize Faces

Just as soon as the NSA willingly hands over any of that data, or solicits the input of another federal agency (let alone local or state police departments) without a written order from someone of authority, your argument may have merit.

I do not see this happening any time soon.

(Note: I have some familiarity with the cultural and procedural difficulties inherent in cooperation, even within a single organization.)

Comment: What about *MY* drones? (Score 5, Insightful) 107

by felisconcolori (#41345477) Attached to: Report Hints At Privacy Problem of Drones That Can Recognize Faces

I often see this targeted specifically towards law enforcement drones. But what about MY drones? Facial recognition software isn't limited to them, and camera-toting low flying drones (or just cameras) are increasingly lower in price. (Example, the AR.Drone.)

If laws are needed to protect privacy, they need to be expanded beyond just law enforcement. I'm certain that Facebook, Amazon, Target, Google, etc, all have far more extensive databases that can (in conjunction with facial recognition software and a camera) not only track where you are (and verify with cell phone data) but what stores are between your destinations, in your vicinity, and target advertisements very specifically.

The government is not efficient enough, nor do they have the technical savvy, to use the vast majority of the data they collect. Even assuming that department A talks to agency C, or that they have remotely compatable databases/protocols.

Comment: How about the extra traffic? (Score 1) 194

by felisconcolori (#24741035) Attached to: Browser Extension Defeats Internet Eavesdropping
Assuming that the add-on becomes a very popular item, and that many people begin using it... how long before we see the following: 1) Poisoned Notaries - hackers setting up their own notaries and somehow inserting them into the system? 2) ISPs getting annoyed with the extra traffic and throttling back? Or ISP-level security appliances becoming suspicious that one GET begets many more connections? (Granted, I think this would have to be a very very well liked add-on, with huge user numbers and very large amounts of certificate checking.) 3) "Transparent" MitM attacks... The man in the middle being transparent to the flow of the certificate, but intercepting other portions of the document? (IANAC, so I have no idea how difficult or complex that may be to implement; I imagine a bit more than normal, as it's not the current topic.)

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