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Comment: Re:Hi speed chase, hum? (Score 1) 37

by maroberts (#47433541) Attached to: The First Person Ever To Die In a Tesla Is a Guy Who Stole One

Having had the experience of having my own performance car stolen temporarily, and damaging it to the extent of needing a new engine and reupholstering, at the time I felt capital punishment is not enough.

You may think this is a little severe, but people who are into cars feel they have had part of their soul ripped out of them if it is stolen and trashed, especially if it is their personal hobby and they are doing it at the limits of their budget.

Comment: Re:Good. Let's go. (Score 1) 140

I'll believe that when I see a process for refining the raw materials in orbit and producing something usable out of them. As is, asteroid mining endeavors are nothing short of magical thinking.

So nothing is real or possible before you see it? Why not kill yourself now, then? After all, tomorrow may never come.

People smarter than you (or I) believe that mining asteroids is not only possible but even feasibly. That doesn't mean that it is, of course. It only means that I have no reason to give a shit what you think about asteroid mining.

Comment: Re:Only one answer, to the Brits (Score 1) 91

by Teun (#47430725) Attached to: Single European Copyright Title On the Horizon

Sorry but I'm pissed off with bankrolling the EU.

Hahaha!

Maggie made sure you guy's contribute less than the others and you are still moaning.
There is ample evidence the EU as an economic partnership is hugely advantageous to all members, yes including the UK.
B.t.w, have you ever thought about why British icons like the Mini, Bentley and Rolls Royce cars are now owned by the losers of WWII?
Indeed, because the Brits have a deficiency in recognising their own shortcomings.

Comment: Whats the problem? (Score 1) 111

by jonwil (#47430705) Attached to: Aereo Embraces Ruling, Tries To Re-Classify Itself As Cable Company

If Aereo is now considered a cable company then presumably it will be paying the same fees to, say, WABC7 in New York as any other cable company operating in New York. So why would WABC7 (or any other station) be unhappy with that?

They get more eyeballs watching their ads and they get the same money from Aereo as they do from cable companies.

Comment: Re:Clear Cut Collusion (Score 1) 70

by drinkypoo (#47430527) Attached to: Google, Dropbox, and Others Forge Patent "Arms Control Pact"

It's a cartel. Put together to ensure the companies in that cartel are safe from patents from one another, while they will continue to use them against companies not in their cartel.
[...]
If this isn't illegal, it bloody well should be.

OK. Tell that to MPEG-LA. By your definition it's a cartel plus extortion. Have fun with that.

Comment: Re:Wish I could say I was surprised (Score 1) 148

by TheRaven64 (#47430255) Attached to: Peer Review Ring Broken - 60 Articles Retracted
In the UK, university research departments are assessed base on the Research Excellence Framework (REF, formerly the Research Assessment Exercise [RAE]). Each faculty member is required to submit 4 things demonstrating impact. These are typically top-tier conference or journal papers, but can also be artefacts or examples of successful technology transfer. The exercise happens every four years, so to get the top ranking you need to write one good paper a year. The only incentive for publishing in second-tier venues is meeting other people who might lead to interesting collaborations.

Comment: Re:Wish I could say I was surprised (Score 1) 148

by TheRaven64 (#47430227) Attached to: Peer Review Ring Broken - 60 Articles Retracted
Reproducing work is often a good thing to set for first-year PhD students to do. If they reproduce something successfully, then they've learned about the state of the art and are in a good position to start original research. If they can't reproduce it, then they've got a paper for one of the debunking workshops that are increasingly attached to major conferences and that's their first publication done...

Comment: Re:I found this article to be more informative (Score 1) 197

by ultranova (#47429977) Attached to: After NSA Spying Flap, Germany Asks CIA Station Chief to Depart

The Gestapo actually wasn't that good at spying. The German people were, however, quite good at turning their neighbors in to the Gestapo.

Which means Gestapo was good at spying. The indicator is whether you get results, after all, not whether you get them because you're smart or scary.

There's a lot of myth concerning the Nazi police force. It's unfortunate that even today people repeat it without thinking.

"He who thus domineers over you has only two eyes, only two hands, only one body, no more than is possessed by the least man among the infinite numbers dwelling in your cities; he has indeed nothing more than the power that you confer upon him to destroy you."

Tyrants stay in power, not because they're stronger than their very source of power, but because they're good at building myths. A nation, company or any other organization is nothing more than a myth shared by its members. And the myth of the Third Reich is so strong it still persists, long after its embodiment is gone, as a kind of ghost nation. Time will tell whether Hitler will take up permanent residence in our collective pantheon along the Caesar's and Napoleon.

Comment: Double edge sword. (Score 4, Interesting) 70

by TapeCutter (#47429957) Attached to: Google, Dropbox, and Others Forge Patent "Arms Control Pact"
A patent cartel is a double edged sword that can smite trolls, competitors, or both. All depends of who's holding the blunt end.

Software patents are absurd and a form of double dipping since software is already protected by copyright they should indeed be scrapped. However just because patents are currently too powerful and have spread into areas where they don't belong does not mean the concept is fundamentally flawed.

The fundamental flaw is greed, the fact that 1000 individuals have obtained an income that is more than 3X that of 1,000,000,000 individuals combined is simply too much of a temptation to all but the strongest moral compass. OTOH, if everyone gets the same income who in their right mind would not just sit back and let "somebody else" worry about silly things such as a job?

The sweet spot lays somewhere in between, most economists put the ideal income ratio between richest and poorest at 10:1 and point to Norway's position at the top of almost every economic and social metric known to man as prima-facie evidence. Norway was smart enough to realise the North Sea oil boom would come to an end one day so they taxed the hell out of oil companies during the boom and invested it in both industrial and social infrastructure. Many economists now argue it is the social infrastructure that has seen the highest ROI.

Here in Australia we have done the opposite with our mining boom, there were some good reforms and we built lots of roads and railways that lead to giant holes in the middle of nowhere but mostly we squandered it on tax cuts and corporate welfare. In the meantime China has been buying our coal and iron ore and for quite some time has been building up their infrastructure at a phenomenal rate. Ironically they now have one of the highest inequity ratings of any nation. This is because of the discrepancy between the rural areas and the "economic zones". China is now in the process of building up the infrastructure in these rural areas but the pace has slowed because of the financial mess in the US and EU. They are now officially in deflation meaning production has overshot demand. Consequently our 25yr mining boom has come to a sudden halt and we have two fifths of fuck all to show for it. Sure our economy is still in much better shape than the EU and US, but I'm old enough to remember when life was good in both Norway and Argentina.

Disclaimer: I plead guilty to OT ranting, but I put it to the reader that a spliff and an end of the working week rant is far more humane than kicking the cat.

Comment: Re:Wish I could say I was surprised (Score 1, Insightful) 148

by TapeCutter (#47429443) Attached to: Peer Review Ring Broken - 60 Articles Retracted

we could increase the penalties for those caught cheating

No thanks, keep the lawyers out of it unless a genuine crime has been commited, the last thing we want is politicians regulating peer-review. There is no system that is totally incorruptable, the fact that these frauds were exposed means the system is working in this case. The fact that the scientific and academic communities will ostrasize the fauds for the rest of their lives is natural justice, anything more crosses the line between natural justice and revenge

Comment: Re:Scoped certificates (Score 1) 107

by jonwil (#47428937) Attached to: India's National Informatics Centre Forged Google SSL Certificates

There are any number of proposals out there to replace or augment CA certificates for SSL purposes (the EFF has Sovereign Keys, there is the DANE proposal to store certificates in DNS with DNSSEC security and there are other proposals out there designed to make it much harder for these kinds of "bogus certificate" type attacks)

Why aren't any of these proposals actually gaining any traction?

An optimist believes we live in the best world possible; a pessimist fears this is true.

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