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Comment: Acronyms of acronyms (Score 1) 101

by falckon (#35616174) Attached to: Internet Abbreviations Added To Oxford Dictionary

I think the next step forward is to start adopting acronyms of acronyms, as we often do in technology names (AJAX). Clearly it takes far too many keystrokes to express such emotions. And as a bonus we can build up fun chains of searches in the dictionary.

OL = OMG LOL = Oh my god, laugh out loud.
IW = IMHO WTH/F = In my humble opinion, what the hell.

Comment: Re:Windows is the only place left for Linux to exp (Score 2, Interesting) 645

by falckon (#34169598) Attached to: Should Being Competitive With Windows Matter For Linux?
I half agree. Linux does not have to be "like Windows" to be suitable as a Desktop OS. It does however help people make the transition, and it could certainly use the market share in order to influence driver developers and video game developers to think of Linux. There is something to be said for keeping the things that make Linux lovers love it, but this is the beauty of having hundreds of distributions.

Comment: Re:Some Helpful Advise (Score 1) 528

by falckon (#32447284) Attached to: Microsoft Talks Back To Google's Security Claims
I could run a script to count the number of SSH login attempts I get daily but I can guarantee you it's in the 1000s. Windows is not the only system that gets targeted. In this case I assume they're trying to get in with weak passwords, but if there was some security vulnerability I bet they would use that instead.

Comment: Re:Oh god.. (Score 1) 659

by falckon (#32402172) Attached to: Students Show a Dramatic Drop In Empathy

Personally I think people are just as self centered now as always and we've just gotten better (supposedly) at measuring it.

Considering each of the questions is on a scale perhaps a more accurate conclusion is that we've become more honest about our own lack of empathy; maybe because such tests have become more anonymous and we are far less accountable for our answers than we used to be. Although that would mean that we've gotten better at measuring it...

Comment: Abusive men are easy to spot (Score 1) 43

by falckon (#32402096) Attached to: Design Contest Highlights Video Games With a Purpose
The moral of the second game seems to be that if you (and this is an encouraged practice) dig through a potential date's belongings while they are busy preparing dinner for you, you will find all the necessary evidence to pass judgment upon them in a couple minutes. In fact, you really don't need to dig much further than the first piece of evidence because if they are a bad person, everything in their house will point to it! The situation is completely black and white, and hence the logical extension is that if you find yourself in such a relationship you aren't very smart because the signs were everywhere.

Comment: Better training (Score 1) 314

by falckon (#30165836) Attached to: Intel Says Brain Implants Could Control Computers By 2020
I don't think training it to react to what you are thinking about is the best idea. It should be the combination of the words you're thinking about and the intent to write it down on the computer. This way you can still have mental tangents without having to worry about constantly turning off the device.

Comment: Re:Backwards? (Score 1) 507

by falckon (#29979724) Attached to: Murderer With "Aggression Genes" Gets Reduced Sentence

Seems to me, those that are _not_ predisposed to violence have a better chance of rehabilitating than those that aren't. Shouldn't they need less time in the slammer to rehabilitate?

Assuming that time in jail does rehabilitate, someone who is not predisposed to violence and has in spite of that committed a violent act is probably in need of more rehabilitation than someone who let slip their violent nature. Nevertheless, I believe all sentences should be equal, and exceptions like these allow for a corrupt system.

Comment: Re:Idiocracy (Score 1) 494

by falckon (#29769951) Attached to: Texas Teen Arrested Under New Online Harassment Law

Obviously Texas lawmakers are unfamiliar with the legal principle "Sticks and stones make break my bones, but words will never hurt me!" If I post online that Cmdr Taco is a goat fucker, have I really "harmed" him or his reputation in any way? It's not slander unless a reasonable person would believe it to be true, and no rational person believes Taco actually dates outside his own species (unlike Captain Kirk).

We all saw it, time to put out an affidavit for the arrest of Coward, first name Anonymous.

Comment: Wireless devices with Master Mode Support (Score 1) 152

by falckon (#29760081) Attached to: Wi-Fi Direct Overlaps Bluetooth Territory For Connecting Devices

Correct me if I'm wrong but the technological "leap" here seems to be that any node can be the server of a wireless communication.

Wi-Fi Direct devices can connect in pairs or in groups. With Wi-Fi Direct only one of the devices needs to be compliant with Wi-Fi Direct to establish the peer-to-peer connection. So, for example, a Wi-Fi Direct-enabled mobile phone could establish a connection with a non-Wi-Fi Direct notebook computer to transfer files between the two.

Seems to be suggesting that a Wi-Fi Direct device will host an access point for the notebook computer to connect to. Otherwise how could such communication with a non Wi-Fi Direct node be possible? There are already certain wireless cards that allow running your device in master mode (appearing as an access point) so that others can connect to you. Combined with a repeater configuration and wireless N speeds and you have the equivalent connectivity of Wi-Fi Direct. So is the leap here that it will be made easy and standard?

Comment: Re:Somehow I see a danger in this . . . (Score 4, Interesting) 229

by falckon (#29680491) Attached to: How Dangerous Could a Hacked Robot Possibly Be?

That said, it has always been the case with computers (and robots are just computers with moving appendages) that if a hacker has physical access to the device, you're basically screwed anyways.

Yes but the vulnerabilities they studied were all over the network vulnerabilities which could be exploited without physical access.

They speak of "compromising" these robots as if user programmable devices are inherently bad. I don't want to see devices locked down into black box "no touch" state because of some fear mongering.

All these robots need is a lightweight linux installation running an ssh daemon to communicate through. Then nobody has anything to worry about.

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