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Comment: Re:I read this and immediately thought (Score 1) 55

by fahrbot-bot (#49189353) Attached to: A Critical Look At CSI: Cyber

"What the fuck did I just read?"

Having only cringed at the previews and not actually seen CSI: Cyber, I can only say that what you just read is the the first /. Summary that perfectly described my initial reaction to, and feelings about, something I'm never going to watch. "Perfectly focus-grouped cast," indeed.

Comment: Re:weird numbers on certs (Score 1) 87

by fahrbot-bot (#49183249) Attached to: Demand For Linux Skills Rising This Year

Agreed, but rather than M$ systems, I was thinking other Unix systems, and not necessarily Internet facing. I've worked several places, admittedly a while ago, that still rely on big-iron systems running Solaris, HP-UX, etc... That kind of hardware can have advantages over a lot of hardware usually used to run Linux (VMs or bare-metal), but you also pay for it.

Comment: Re:The idea was a good one, the execution poor (Score 1) 201

by fahrbot-bot (#49166633) Attached to: That U2 Apple Stunt Wasn't the Disaster You Might Think It Was

Does the iTunes Terms of Service, to which users presumably agreed, specify that Apple may add (or remove) things to (from) your device that you did not request and/or w/o your specific consent? If so, then your analogy holds (at least technically) else it doesn't.

I suspect that people got bent out of shape because either Apple wasn't really allowed to do this sort of thing, or people didn't realize Apple actually was allowed to.

Comment: Re:The idea was a good one, the execution poor (Score 1) 201

by fahrbot-bot (#49165891) Attached to: That U2 Apple Stunt Wasn't the Disaster You Might Think It Was

Not asking permission is theft.

I'm a fan of U2 and I can see how some people might consider what they did rude or presumptuous, but theft? - No, ...

Not theft, but how about "breaking and entering"? Apple entered (violated) people's personal space w/o permission.

Comment: Re:The idea was a good one, the execution poor (Score 1) 201

by fahrbot-bot (#49165879) Attached to: That U2 Apple Stunt Wasn't the Disaster You Might Think It Was

Honestly, I'm still baffled so many people were upset about getting a few album from a popular, well respected, rock band, simply because it found its way directly onto people's devices. It's not as if it woke you up at 3am and started playing it!

Image, instead, that Apple broke into people's houses and left a physical copy of the U2 album on dining room table. How do you think you / everyone would feel about that? While you might argue that digitally pushing the album out isn't really the same thing, it kind of is. Apple entered (violated) people's personal space w/o permission.

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